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Malpensa Express Train & Eurail Pass / Trenitalia

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Apr 29th, 2010, 07:36 AM
  #1
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Malpensa Express Train & Eurail Pass / Trenitalia

Hello,
Since our hotel is closer to Cadorna, we plan to take the train. Will our Eurail pass work on the train? Since we are in Milan 3 days, would be better off purchasing this ticket and opting for fewer days on our Eurail Pass? What is the difference between Rail Europe and Trentitalia?
Many thanks,
jane
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Apr 29th, 2010, 07:56 AM
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Have you already purchased the rail pass? If not, you might want to compare the cost of the pass to the total cost of the point-to-point tickets you'll need. The pass may not be cheaper.

The Malpensa Express train is operated by a different company than Trenitalia. I don't know whether a rail pass could be used on this train but I doubt it.

RailEurope is a company that sells tickets and passes for a profit. Trenitalia is the name of the Italian rail company.

You can check timetables and most ticket prices on the Trenitalia website. You can't search dates far into the future, but the timetables don't change that much. If you want to see trains for Rome-Florence on a Wednesday, just search Wednesday next week.

http://www.ferroviedellostato.it/homepage_en.html
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Apr 29th, 2010, 09:34 AM
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Railpasses - either Eurail or Italy Railpasses, etc are not valid on the Malpensa Express since it is not part of the Trenitalia = state-run Italian railways but part of a commuter rail network - but the fare is dirt-cheap - just a few euros.

RailEurope is owned by the French and Swiss Railways and sells passes and tickets for all of Europe directly and thru many agents who it supplies (some of these have lower mailing costs than RailEurope for the same ticket or pass, prices being set by RailEurope) - if you are only going to travel in Italy that a Eurailpass is of dubious value - and you would only consider the Italy Railpass and even then you have to be doing more than a few rail trips to make it worthwhile. For loads of info on passes and European trains i always spotlight these fab sites - www.budgeteuropetravel.com; www.ricksteves.com; www.seat61.com - www.trenitalia.com is the Italian Railways web portal and shows fares in euros bought locally.

What are you overall rail plans? This would better help others judge the efficacy of a pass. And though i am a HUGE booster of railpasses, having used literally 100s over decades some people automatically just think of a Eurailpass no matter what their travel plans because that is what they have heard of - whether a pass passes for your plans or not depends on how much you are taking trains and in what countries.
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Apr 29th, 2010, 02:33 PM
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A rail pass is rarely cost effective for Italy. It's almost always cheaper to buy point-to-point tickets in Italy from Trenitalia which includes your seat reservations (mandatory on most trains in Italy). Rail passes do not include the mandatory seat reservation which you must purchase in addition to the cost of the pass. Rail passes are usually not good for traveling to and from airports (some 1st class passes will include some airport trains)nor for commuter trains such as the train between Naples and Sorrento.
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Apr 30th, 2010, 09:28 AM
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Let's look at what kybourbon claims - railpasses rarely cost-effective in Italy alone

A common itinerary seems to be
Rome-Naples-Florence-Venice

fares from trenitalia.com

Rome-Naples 57 e/ 44 e (1st and 2nd class)
Naples-Florence 101 e/ 71e
Florence-Venice 59e/42e

Total 1st class 217 e/ 161e
or about $303/ $225 +3% if your c card as typical charges 3% for foreign purchases
$312/$232

A 3-day Italy Flexipass (Saver p.p.)
1st cl = $218 p.p. 2nd cl = $179 p.p.

Add on a 10 e surcharge for each of the 3 EuroStar Italia trains = 30 e or about $45

3-day Italy Flexipass (Saver p.p.)
1st cl = $248 p.p. 2nd cl = $209 p.p.

vs $312/$232 if just buying tickets as kybourbon claims is almost always cheaper

Actually the 3-day Italy Pass would seem to save you, in 1st cl $64 p.p. and in 2nd class $23

Kybourbon what am i missing or have you not compared pass prices to point-point tickets

And if folks are landing in Milan the Milan-Rome fare is 114 euro/ 89 e in 2nd cl

A 4th day on an Italy Pass is only $24 for the 4th day (and subsequent days up to max 10 and only $20 in 2nd cl

So if you get above the 3-day minimum on the pass the pass becomes incredibly cheaper per day

anyway to say that a railpass for Italy is rarely cost effective seems to be not true at all - unless i am missing something?

The Fodor's mantra is railpasses are always a waste of money and point-point is better - say something enough and folks will believe it.
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Apr 30th, 2010, 12:30 PM
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Rail passes are usually not good for traveling to and from airports (some 1st class passes will include some airport trains)nor for commuter trains such as the train between Naples and Sorrento.>

In Italy you can reach both Rome airports by train and thus railpasses in either class

You can reach Pisa's large international airport by train

Now Milan's Malpensa Express, as noted above, does not accept railpasses but costs just a few euros

Venice is reached cheapest by bus - a few euros or boat - many more euros.

as for the Naples to Sorrento train they cost all of 3 euros.
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Apr 30th, 2010, 02:20 PM
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It really just depends on how you cook the travel.

Here is another trip

1st class only since I'm too lazy to do both.

Rome - Florence 62 euro
Florence - Milan 70 euro
Milan Venice
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Apr 30th, 2010, 02:24 PM
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Geez I should learn to not hit keys ;-)

It really just depends on how you cook the travel.

Here is another trip

1st class only since I'm too lazy to do both.

Rome - Florence 62 euro
Florence - Milan 70 euro
Milan Venice 43 euro

175 euro

BTW, only European residents can travel on Interrail passes for most others it's Eurail which is slightly more expensive.

1st Class 3 day in 2 months Eurail pass

182 euro
30 euro for reservations

212 euro or 37 euro more
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Apr 30th, 2010, 04:14 PM
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PQ - Without knowing the OP's schedule, there is no way of knowing 100% if a pass is cost effective. The reduction in the cost of seat reservations from 20€AV and 15€ES this year does help, but you still have to crunch the numbers.

>>>A 3-day Italy Flexipass (Saver p.p.)
1st cl = $218 p.p. 2nd cl = $179 p.p.
Add on a 10 e surcharge for each of the 3 EuroStar Italia trains = 30 e or about $45
3-day Italy Flexipass (Saver p.p.)
1st cl = $248 p.p. 2nd cl = $209 p.p.<<<

Is this "new math"? Adding € to dollars? $218+$45=$263, not $248, etc.

You are ignoring the trains you always tout (the ones you say you always ride) which are a bit slower. You can train from Rome to Naples on a slower train for only 10-20€ (the 20€ train only adds 60 minutes to the trip) or better yet, take the bus all the way from Rome to Amalfi (where most people are headed anyway) for only 17€. You are also tacking on fees many of us don't even have. I never pay 3% as I use cards that don't tack on such charges. You have selected some of the longer routes to try to make your numbers crunch, but it's of no use if that is not where the person is traveling. If you travel long distances on the faster trains (which don't go to or stop at small cities)then a pass can pay off, but most people are traveling Rome/Florence/Venice with perhaps a side trip to Pisa, Orvieto or some small town daytrip where the numbers just won't crunch in favor or a pass. It is usually cheaper to buy p-t-p in Italy or take a bus unless traveling long distances.

>>In Italy you can reach both Rome airports by train and thus railpasses in either class<<<

Um, no. It's true you can reach one airport by train (FCO)from Rome, but not the other (CIA requires multi styles of transport as there is no train station at CIA or you can take a shuttle bus). The trains to the FCO airport are NOT COVERED by a pass unless you buy a 1st class pass (not sure if that includes the 1st cl saver pass) and that short 30 minute ride uses a full day off your pass. So if you take the train from FCO to Termini that is one day off your pass gone. If you were to travel on to Florence or Naples that day, that would be two days off your pass in one day. It doesn't make sense to use a day off of a 1st cl pass for a 14€ ticket to the airport (only 8€ by shuttle bus). Using a day off the 3 day 1st cl flexi pass would cost you $85 for that airport train or 3 day saver pass 1st cl would cost $72.
http://www.sitbusshuttle.it/

From the RailEurope website:
Trains
* Free transfer is available on the Leonardo Express between Fiumicino Airport and Roma Termini train station for 1st class passholders only. This transfer requires use of one day of travel on the pass.

The same is true for lots of other train lines in Italy as there are quite a few private lines that you need to take (or bus which is often better and almost always cheaper).

I can bus from Rome to Siena for only 5€ and the bus drops me in the historic center of Siena while the train would drop me at the edge of town, require train changes (Chuisi, Grosseto, Florence?) and I would still have to get other transport to the center. Travel time for train or bus is about 3 hours. No brainer to me. Even using the cheapest pass, that train ride would cost you $59. Trains are not always the best solution in Italy.
http://www.sena.it/index_e.htm?CID=A...YFKCCV05810248

The same is true for Siena/Florence. Bus is 6€ to historic center in Siena, is faster than the train and you aren't left at the edge of town needing a bus to the center.
http://www.sitabus.it/sita-toscana/Firenze-Siena08.pdf

>>>The Fodor's mantra is railpasses are always a waste of money and point-point is better - say something enough and folks will believe it.<<<

That is usually said for Italy, not other countries where you can hop many trains without seat reservations.

PQ's mantra is always "get a pass" even when it's better/cheaper/faster to bus, buy p-to-p or use a budget airline.
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May 1st, 2010, 12:24 PM
  #10
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Thank you all for your answers. I have been on the Trenitalia site and am totally confused. It seems only Italians/Europeans can purhase the pass.

Palenque suggested my itinerary would help in answering the question.

We are 5, arriving in Milan on a Monday.
Wednesday, depart to Bologna for 3 nights where we will do side trips to Modena, Parma and possibly Verona.
Sunday: train to Sacile because our nephew is stationed at Aviano. From there day off, side trip to Padua, Venice and ?
Friday Return home.

It really seems like a scattered agenda but in my mind makes some geographical sense.

Hotel reservations have been made. Hoping the stay in Bologna offers a point for easy train connections. We tried to arrange the trip with few overnights allowing for side trips from each.

The railpass seemd to offer convenience as we could just arrive at the station. From reading earlier posts, reservations need to be made for each trip? am I correct?

Thank you all for the time to answer,
jane
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May 1st, 2010, 01:55 PM
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P-to-p prices:

Milan/Bologna 41€
Bologna/Parma 5.80€
Bologna/Modena 3.10€
Bologna/Verona 7€-21€
Bologna/Sacile 32€
Sacile/Padova 5.25€
Sacile/Venice 4.60€

It's easy to see a pass is not cost effective for your itinerary as some days you will only be spending a few euro. If you haven't already purchased a pass, just buy p-to-p.

>>>The railpass seemd to offer convenience as we could just arrive at the station. From reading earlier posts, reservations need to be made for each trip? am I correct?<<

For many trains in Italy you must have a seat to ride which you have to purchase in addition to the pass. Since several of your trips are very short, cheap hops to smaller towns you will not need seats on some of them as they are only serviced by the slow R trains that don't have seat reservations for anyone. All other trains in Italy have a mandatory seat requirement (AV/ES/ICPlus/IC). The ticket prices you see on Trenitalia for the AV/ES/ICPlus/IC trains include the seat. Rail passes do not include seats and you have to purchase them for trains that require it (if they aren't sold out). When you buy for any of those trains, you are buying an assigned seat on a specific train at a specific time.

>>>Thank you all for your answers. I have been on the Trenitalia site and am totally confused. It seems only Italians/Europeans can purhase the pass.<<<

Yes, I think you are confused. There are rail passes for sale outside of Europe marketed to US and other countries by RailEurope. These need to be purchased before leaving for Europe (you don't need one so don't buy one). There are rail passes from Trenitalia for citizens of Italy or Europe that US citizens can't buy. I think that might be what's confusing you.
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May 3rd, 2010, 10:05 AM
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PQ's mantra is always "get a pass" even when it's better/cheaper/faster to bus, buy p-to-p or use a budget airline.>

It may seemso to you because you have obviously not read my many posts where i tell someone a pass for their plans would be a waste of money - like i certainly would have told Calvados for his short trains - i understand you feel on the defensive for your statement



and after chosing a very typical train itinerary for tourists i showed that that statement just was not true - but misinformation

Now kybourbon is one poster who i believe does try to give the best advice and info - to wit her tieless responses to Italian travel questions and especially questions about trenitalia.com - but i believe she just never checked the facts when repeating the Fodor's mantra that "railpasses are rarely cost-effective" - and perhaps not realizing how much Trenitalia has raised the cost of its fastest EuroStar (ES) trains and simply did not check pass prices. Hopefully in the future she can temper those remarks so as to not give out misinformation

And if i add a few more days to my calculations - say for someone going into or out of Milan or going to the Cinque Terre then the pass becomes a no-brainer as extra days p.p. above the base are a ridiculous $20 or even less per day.

And of course you would not use the pass on $5 trips - this is a flexpass - use your 100% travel days whenever you want over a two-month period.

anyway to say that i always say a railpass is the best deal is more misinformation in light of my many many advices on Fodors to people to not even consider a pass for their plans
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May 3rd, 2010, 11:13 AM
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The same is true for lots of other train lines in Italy as there are quite a few private lines that you need to take (or bus which is often better and almost always cheaper)>

well there are not that many - ones i think most would use would be Naples to Sorrento - all of 3 euro and the Nord de Milano (sp?) lines like the Malpensa Express - again a few euro

and of course you would not use a flexipass on any day when the train trip is so cheap - so that is really a Red Herring IMO

we are talking about ever more expensive high-speed lines that most tourists do end up taking and that was what I used as an example - yup i'd just as soon take a few hours longer going between Florence and Rome on IC or Regional trains but most tourist do not.
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May 3rd, 2010, 05:51 PM
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PQ - You argue this all the time and post random long itineraries that suggest a pass is cost effective, not to mention adding euro to dollars. For the regular tourists routes, it simply isn't, as notbob and I both pointed out. It's of no benefit to the OP to argue about random routes he is not taking. It is not cost effective for the OP to get a pass.

>>>Hopefully in the future she can temper those remarks so as to not give out misinformation<<<
>>>and of course you would not use a flexipass on any day when the train trip is so cheap - so that is really a Red Herring IMO<<<

You were the one that threw out the red herring when you said the airport train was included with a pass. You had no clue you could only use the airport train with a 1st class pass and that it used a full day off the pass . You were the one giving misinformation. A pass is not cost effective for the OP.
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May 4th, 2010, 08:01 AM
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The trains to the FCO airport are NOT COVERED by a pass unless you buy a 1st class pass (not sure if that includes the 1st cl saver pass) and that short 30 minute ride uses a full day off your pass.>

Not true - do your research - railpasses are valid on regional trains - 2nd class only - running between Rome's airport and several stations in Rome - i have used it to go to Trastevere station - it goes via Ostiense to Tiburtina, which if getting a taxi is simpler than the much more hectic Rome Termini station IME - and by changing once you can get to Termini itself with a 2nd class railpass.

Of course you would only use a railpass on these trains if you were going on from Rome elsewhere or coming back to Rome and going straight away to the airport - otherwise it would not be worth it to use a day but just pay out of pocket.

And if going from the airport elsewhere taking the regional train could take you directly to places like Orvieto, without going into Rome Termini and changing (not sure about Orvieto but these trains keep going out of Rome.
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May 4th, 2010, 12:58 PM
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PQ - Without knowing the OP's schedule, there is no way of knowing 100% if a pass is cost effective.>

so tell me then how is it you can say a railpass is rarely effective as a response?
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May 5th, 2010, 01:20 PM
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The reduction in the cost of seat reservations from 20€AV and 15€ES this year does help, but you still have to crunch the numbers.>

Actually it is 10 euros on many Eurostar trains not 15 euros.
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May 5th, 2010, 01:44 PM
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PQ - You misread again. The fees until mid-Dec 2009 were 20€AV and 15€ES just as I typed. Did you miss the word from?
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May 6th, 2010, 02:10 PM
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bourbon - yes i misread and read 20 to 15. My apologies for sloppy reading.

Cheers
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Dec 16th, 2010, 12:56 AM
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Hello,

Can anyone help me, I going to Milan on Christmas day. Does anyone know that the Malpensa Express Train its working on Christmas day?

How can I get myself to Wegner merto station from Malpensa Airport? I am going to stay in Milan Marriott Hotel
Milan Marriott Hotel Via Washington, 66 · Milan, 20146 Italy.

many thanks xxxxx
tim
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