London to Belgium ...by boat?

Aug 31st, 2006, 08:47 AM
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London to Belgium ...by boat?

Is Eurostar the only option for traveling from London to Bruges? I took a boat a long while back and I am wonder if that is still an option. I am traveling Sat. Sept. 16 and was hoping to travel eariler than the eurostar trains allow.
AnnaLeonard is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 08:55 AM
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There was a ferry that connected Dover with Ostend, then on by connecting rail to Brussels. But I do not know if this ferry/rail service still runs.
USNR is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 08:56 AM
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Eurostar trains start around 6am - if speed is your criteria the boat would take about 4 hours if there were any to Belgium anymore - believe there are not. Quickest way to Bruges is to take Eurostar to Lille then train from there to Bruges. Cheapest way is to take Eurostar to Brussels (just a few dollars more than Lille) and then used the ABS (All Belgian Stations) fare that comes with all Eurostar tickets allowing you free transfer with 24 hours on any train to Bruges - saving perhaps $20 over Lille route but about an hour longer. If going one-way fares to Brussels/Bruges via ABS start at around $89 but to get these tickets you must usually book far in advance. RailEurope is the major supplier in the U.S. - i always recommend BETS (800-441-2387), a RE agent for their superb service in my experience and won't charge RE's $15 mailing fee for orders under $200. You can check fares in pounds at www.eurostar.co.uk or www.eurostar.com - sometimes can be cheaper than available ones in U.S. so always compare.
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Aug 31st, 2006, 09:17 AM
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You could take the ferry from Dover to Calais, then the train to Brugge. It would be a very long journey though! The boat trip takes about 1 hr 20 min., the train between 2 hrs 20 min. and 5 hrs.!
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Aug 31st, 2006, 09:51 AM
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Here's an interactive map showing all the ferry routes:

http://www.directferries.co.uk/routes.htm
Dukey is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 11:41 AM
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1. Wow!!!!! 2 posters - one of them certainly American - able to spell Bruges properly. Is this a record? Could it possibly mean people will start getting Cologne, Milan, Naples and Thessalonica right?

2. There is a ferry from Ramsgate to Ostend (www.transeuropaferries.co.uk)
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Aug 31st, 2006, 12:16 PM
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Transeuropa runs ferries from Ramsgate to Oostende, but they don't carry foot passengers. There are no other ferry services from southern England to Belgium. Even when there were ferries to Belgium, the journey took a lot longer than the journey by Eurostar.
GeoffHamer is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 12:24 PM
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Thanks to all for your replies. They are helpful. I looked at investigating going into Lille instead of Brussels.
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Aug 31st, 2006, 12:44 PM
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Author: MyriamC ([email protected])
Date: 08/31/2006, 12:17 pm
You could take the ferry from Dover to Calais, then the train to Brugge.

Flanneruk: Now do you fault Myriam for using Brugge? After all she's i believe a Flemish Belgian who has always used Brugge, the town name in local parlance or should she do like Rheims and use the English spelling? I think not.
That English language abitrators like yourself chose to use the French spelling for Bruges means little but a remnant of the time French culture ruled over Flemish Belgium and imposed their language on them - even mandating French be taught in schools i believe. Otherwise it would never have been called Bruges, perhaps.
Much ado about nuthing!
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Aug 31st, 2006, 12:50 PM
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Not to mention more than a tad hypocritical from someone who spells Basel as Basle.
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Aug 31st, 2006, 12:59 PM
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And flanneruk - in American English it's Reims - why should i use a Britism Rheims - and Edinburgh - here it's pronounced Edin-burg not Edinburl - should we say Edin-burl - me i do but i find it a bit presumptive to do so.
News Flash: The sun has long set on the British Empire - it now basically rises in Dover and sets in Blackpool. Personally i like using the local spelling or pronuciation - yes Koln over Cologne, Antwerpen over Antwerp and Brugge over Bruges -especially when in the local country.
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Aug 31st, 2006, 01:16 PM
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AnnaLeonard - I took the ferry from Dover to Ostende in September many years ago and it was a very rough ride in contrast to a crossing from Calais to Dover on a sunny Sunday in July.

BTilke - The British version for Basel is indeed "Basle". That spelling is perfectly correct. Basel is also spelled "Bâle" in French and "Basilea" in Italien

waggis is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 01:21 PM
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The official name the City of Bruges has has in English is Bruges. That's what it says on the city's web site: that's how Brugeois refer to their city when speaking English.

Europeans who speak English, speak English. Only racist stereotypes of Italians say "I a fromma Roma": only the crudest jokes about Germans have them saying "I komm from Koln, ja?"
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Aug 31st, 2006, 01:21 PM
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In Bale with the tent above the a of course means an s has been omitted so the French Basle corresponds with the British Basle - i'm picking up a trend here - Brits have taken French spellings for their own i guess.
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Aug 31st, 2006, 01:57 PM
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The one and only official name of the city of Brugge is BRUGGE. It's in the Flemish speaking part of Belgium.
MyriamC is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 02:02 PM
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Actually, Waggis, the English name for the airport that serves Basel is Basel-Mulhouse-Freiburg. It is NOT Basle Mulhouse Freiburg in English, as FlUK called it.
http://www.euroairport.com/EN/accueil.php
The official English language web site for Basel is
http://www.basel.ch/en/basel/home
The OLD British spelling of Basel was Basle, but the move is now to use Basel following the city's successful petition to have the official English spelling changed to the German one for purposes of standardization (pushed by bankers, who do carry some influence in Switzerland):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basel
http://odge.info/english-german/Basl...ial+form).html
BTilke is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 02:04 PM
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If you're going to do German spellings, you must master the umlaut. Either

Köln

or

Koeln

is acceptable; Koln is not.
Robespierre is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 02:05 PM
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perhaps this link will work better:
http://odge.info/index.php?ebene=Search&kw=basle
BTilke is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 02:23 PM
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Place names are proper nouns like the names of people which are not translated. Nobody refers to the Italian composer Mr Green (Verdi) or the former German chancellor Mr Cabbage (Kohl). In the days when most people only read about foreign places in books, Anglicised versions of place names were common, but, travellers to foreign places need to know the names which will appear on road signs, railway timetables, etc. Visitors to Italy, for example, need to know that to get to "Florence", they need to catch a train to Firenze.
GeoffHamer is offline  
Aug 31st, 2006, 02:46 PM
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...except Victor Borge. "Joe Green" was one of his favorite composers of opera.
Robespierre is offline  

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