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Kids Want Afternoon Tea In London, Mom Freaks Out At Expense

Kids Want Afternoon Tea In London, Mom Freaks Out At Expense

Old Jul 31st, 2007, 04:21 AM
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Kids Want Afternoon Tea In London, Mom Freaks Out At Expense

My family of five is spending a week in London in August. My kids are adamant that they want to go to afternoon tea. I checked threads here, and it seems that afternoon tea costs 25-30 pounds, per person.

Let's see. That's, oh, 150 pounds for all of us. $305. For tea. And scones. And other stuff that might be yummy.

We're staying in Clerkenwell. Can anyone recommend a specific place for afternoon tea (there or anywhere) that won't break the bank?

Cindy -- half-wondering whether she could get away with taking it out of their college funds
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 04:30 AM
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We've enjoyed the teas at Fortnum and Mason and Richoux. Both cost less than the teas at a hotel.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:25 AM
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When they say afternoon tea, what is it they're hoping for? If it's fancy service with a flourish, then it's likely to be a bit on the pricey side, especially in the posh hotels.

If it's tea with some sort of confectionery, there are plenty of places. Many are cafeteria style, but there are plenty with waiter service.

You could try
http://www.teaandcoffeemuseum.co.uk/tea_room/index.htm.

Way out on a limb, the scones at Mudchute City Farm are fresh made deliciously crumbly (when I had them last week); and the jam was home-made. But it really only makes sense as part of a trip out to Greenwich; and you have to walk several hundred yards from the station through the parkland and past the animals:
http://www.mudchute.org/shop.htm
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:34 AM
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Unless you've changed flats since your earlier posts, you're not staying in Clerkenwell.

You're staying in Finsbury, or the Angel, or just plain Islington. And Islingtonians don't do afternoon tea, so I'm hardly an expert on this bizarre fetish but let's see if this provokes some other suggestions.

You can get a decent cup of tea at Brown's on Islington Green, or sometimes Afternoon Tease at Volupte down in Norwich St, EC4. But all that Stephen Fry butlery nonsense that's possibly what your children are looking for is deeply incompatible with the zeitgeist of the People's Republic of Islington. Anyway, who's got time to sit down for tea at just the time you've got to collect James and Caroline from school while charging yourself out at £1,000 an hour for due diligence on a PE buyout?

There are a couple of obsequiousness-free tea places reasonably nearby: the Great Court at the British Museum (for which you must reserve), or the Raj Tea Rooms at the top of Highgate High Street (<i>so </i>handy for Karl Marx's tomb).

But otherwise, you'll have to trek to the West End for Fortnum's, Richoux, Sotheby's Cafe or the Orangerie to get a bit ofthe white-glove treatment without forking out the Berkeley's silly prices.

Or try <i>le fif o'clock </i>at Paul (www.paul-uk.com) in Covent Garden or Marylebone High St
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:34 AM
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&pound;150? Have you thought of saying no to this colossal waste of money?
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:40 AM
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Tell your kids how expensive it is and suggest that the pay for it out of their spending oney
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:44 AM
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Have I thought of saying &quot;no?&quot;

Heck, yeah.

But this is our first-ever trip abroad. My eldest goes to college in 2 years. In 9 years, we will be empty-nesters. It seems a shame to spend $$$$$$$$$$$$ taking everyone to Europe and then refusing even to try to find a reasonably priced way to do something they want to do.

Man, how I would love to say no, though.

No, we haven't changed locations. You're right that we're on Percy Street, so Finsbury or Islington is the idea. Sorry, my recollection of the place names is a bit suspect at times.

How much are the teas in some of the places recommended? And can I get away with black pants, nice black shoes and a sleeveless drapy colorful top? What does my husband need?
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:54 AM
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You might try the Brahma Tea and Coffee Museum: they serve an ok tea, its full of historical ambiance and its near the Tate.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 05:58 AM
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&quot;can I get away with black pants&quot;

No-one's going to care what colour your underwear is. But they'd probably prefer you to wear trousers, jeans or a skirt as well.

Though the idea that any of the places I've suggested would have the cheek to tell a customer what to wear is absurd. This isn't New York.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:21 AM
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Many of the top hotels in London offer discounts at tea for people who have checked their luggage on the flight over . . . just a thought.
 
Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:24 AM
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Is it just me or would this post qualify as a potential sitcom!!??
LOL!!
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:27 AM
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cindy

They may change their minds once they're there. I know my kids had several &quot;musts&quot; on their first trip but often found more interesting stuff.

Just say &quot;Yes&quot; and you'll be a hero no matter what. If you go to tea - great. It's only money . If they find other interests, you're STILL the hero!

Have a great time. My kids' first exposure to Europe was England. Now they love it as much as I do.

(and make sure you take that cheesy photo at Abbey Road!)
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:30 AM
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a set afternoon tea at any of the &quot;name&quot; hotels will run &pound;20 and up - some waaay up.

And even the restaurant in the Br Museum Great court will cost about the same.

I'd suggest the Orangery in Kensington Gardens- it won't be cheap but will be a less then the Ritz, etc. A set tea will still run about &pound;15 pp.

A full afternoon tea will have enough food so you can really cut back at dinner. I often book a late tea on a day when I'm going to the theatre. Tea at 4:00 or 5:00 and then just a quick bite after the play.

If you do have a full tea you can skip either lunch or a big dinner, so the expense averages out and you really aren't spending much more than you would have that day.

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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:31 AM
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Why don't you just go to a regular caf&eacute;? Sod all the Jeeves and Wooster stuff. You can get tea and scones all over.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:36 AM
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Hi Cindy,

See http://tinyurl.com/3cnbvm


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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 06:54 AM
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Just checked the Ritz price for afternoon tea for a client and the price is 80&pounds; for two people.

As has been mentioned, there are more reasonably priced places. The Orangery would be my choice, but Richoux's is also good.At either place you could just order tea and scones for considerably less than for an 'afternoon tea'.

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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 07:01 AM
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yes - you can have tea and scones anywhere. But that is a snack and you'd still have to deal w/ lunch/dinner. A full set tea has sandwiches (small but surprisingly filling), pastries, scones and more. So if you are going to &quot;do tea&quot; I'd spring for the full spread.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 07:02 AM
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Cindy, are you going to any of the National Trust places? Most of them serve afternoon tea, and you might find one which serves tea in a beautiful garden next to a grand mansion. The price should be way less than 25 pounds. Of course there's the admission fee, but maybe you can find tea at a place you'd be going to anyway.
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 07:04 AM
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Bramah Tea Museum-7 pounds each and free history!
http://www.teaandcoffeemuseum.co.uk/tea_room/index.htm
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Old Jul 31st, 2007, 07:06 AM
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A Fodorite from London posted about having tea at a Church. It may have been near Hampstead Heath. The website was posted and it looked like a great place for tea(and at a decent price) and only available in summer which could work for you and your family. I think the tea was served out on the lawn.Perhaps that poster will chime in--it was posted summer 2006.
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