Jet Lag products???

Old May 8th, 2005, 04:34 PM
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Jet Lag products???

I posted this under another topic as well, but need an answer quickly so here it goes again.

Has anyone ever used a product called No-Jet-Lag? It is made up of homeopathic ingredients and would be a get help, I would hope, for our trip next week from California to Sicily.

Thanking you in advance!!
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Old May 8th, 2005, 04:38 PM
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http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34587107
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Old May 8th, 2005, 04:40 PM
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http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34540916

LOL, ignore the first thread I have provided the link to..if you type jet lag or no jet lag into the search box, you can research that way..good luck!
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Old May 8th, 2005, 05:00 PM
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There have been no well planned, carefully controlled studies of these products that I know of. Whether or not they are more effective than a placebo, I don't know.

I sometimes think that if people think they will not have jet lag, they don't have the symptoms.

There is scientific evidence that getting out in the sunlight as soon after arrival as possible helps to reset the body's internal clock.

That hypothosis was tested at Cornell U, and there seems to be some validity to the assertion.

Anything else is simply a series of anecdotal descriptions, which may or may not indicate actual results.

The placebo effect is strong, and remains one of the mysteries of life.



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Old May 8th, 2005, 05:07 PM
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I ditto Bob's point on the placebo effect. Homeopathic remedies make no sense in that they are based on the idea that the remedy is more potent the futher it is diluted. Most of them are so diluted there is one molecule of active ingredient in the equivalent volume of a swimming pool. More importantly, they haven't been shown to be effective in clinical studies. But if by some fluke it works for you, then use it.
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Old May 8th, 2005, 05:33 PM
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My opinion is that when flying from west to east, the problem is sleep deprivation more than anything else more mysterious.
Many of us end up doing the equivalent of an all-nighter, getting at most 2-3 hours of sleep if any at all, and then we arrive in Europe in the morning or mid-day and wonder why we are exhausted.

On the other hand, I do feel jet lag when returning home from Europe. For a day or two afterwards I am truly exhausted, regardless of how much sleep I get, and I think it is my body clock just readjusting itself. That, and my European vacations are usually pretty busy.
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Old May 8th, 2005, 05:41 PM
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I an glad to know that I am not the only one who has the same fatigue problems as described by Elaine.

I know one year we emptied the dividend miles bank and upgraded to business class. I arrived much more rested.

The year we were forced to land in Shannon rather than Dublin was most fatiguing. I think it was the 4 hour bus trip from Shannon to Dublin that really put me in a surly mood. We got underway after we had sat around Shannon for 4 hours wondering what would happen next. Finally buses were assembled and off we went.

To cap it off, we were 4 hours late getting out of Philly.
So we got to our hotel 13 hours behind schedule.
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Old May 8th, 2005, 07:34 PM
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Jet lag hits me when we are in Europe, I have such a hard time waking up early enough.
But once we are home, I am awake every day at 5 am , (that is when I sleep late and I am ready to zoom through the day til bedtime, which is around 6:00pm LOL
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Old May 8th, 2005, 08:04 PM
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Hi Pam,
Yes, I have used No-Jet-Lag. And for whatever the reason, being medical or placebo, yes it works for me. I use it frequently when flying coast to coast, and also for overseas travel. Just follow the directions.
Good luck and Happy Travels.
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Old May 8th, 2005, 09:49 PM
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We have had two separate trips to Rome from Australia (about a 24 hr flight) and used No-Jetlag tablets on the second trip. They really seemed to make a difference, on arrival we were brighter, more alert, less disoriented, less tired etc. I don't care why they work, as long as they make a difference! We are going to try them again.
Kay
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Old May 8th, 2005, 10:37 PM
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For the past 7 years, I have traveled to Europe every 4-6 weeks, for 4-10 days. I am permanently in a state of jet-lag and sleep deprivation. I have gone straight from trans-Atlantic flights into all day meetings and on to dinner.

I have used “No-Jet-Lag” recently on three trips and can tell you that I felt MUCH better with the stuff than I have without the stuff. I genuinely believe that it made a difference

Given the fact that I travel more in one year than most people travel in a lifetime, I really don’t thing my body would be fooled by the “placebo effect”.

Try it. What do you have to lose

Regards Ger
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Old May 9th, 2005, 04:00 AM
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great recommendation ger, thanks.
I just bought some Airborne too (supposedly to ward off viruses and such on planes) so with those, and my wrapped hand wipes, I will have quite a pharmaceutical supply for my next flight.
I'm starting to think, I wouldn't want to sit next to me.
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Old May 9th, 2005, 05:50 AM
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For some reason, I don't "believe" in the various cold preventatives, but am a die-hard fan of "No Jet Lag". The cheapest I've found is on Amazon.com, just bought two packages...

Placebo effect might be the answer - the mind is a wonderful thing!
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Old May 9th, 2005, 06:30 AM
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I am not saying the stuff is ineffective. I am saying I would like to see the results of a controlled study of its effects.

For example, glucosamine sulfate is effective against arthritis. For years doctors told me it's value was dubious.
Now, controlled studies are showing that it is indeed effective in some cases in helping people with arthritis.

I took it for years, but in the end I had to have my hip replaced anyhow.
I probably should not have postponed it because the longer I limped the weaker the muscles became and the longer the recovery.

But in this case, there may well be some effect. But until there is a controlled study we will not know for sure.

The situation that finally forced the medical profession to look closely at glucosamine sulfate was thousands of anecdotal stories that it worked.

Perhaps something like that is needed with these no lag remedies.

chamomile, arnica and bellis perennis are in the tablet. Lyvopidium is in it too, and is claimed to be an anti anxiety agent.

I know I was told by my ophthalmologist that I was in the early stages of macular degeneration. He strongly suggest ICAPS - Areds formulation.
Now, a scientific study indicates that the stuff helps.

If it doesn't hurt, try it. If it works for an individual for any reason, use it. Beats boozing it up before a long flight!

One thing I have often wondered, however, is the role of dehydration in the fatigue and whatnot symptoms.

My last flight I just about drank all their water. I arrived feeling better.
But there were too many other variables to mix in that destroyed the control.

As my wife said, the sun came up that morning. Perhaps that helped. Well, maybe it did. It was bright and beautiful and we were out in it early.

Or maybe it was that breakfast we had.
Or ...
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Old May 9th, 2005, 06:54 AM
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Kay F
Good to hear from another Australian who watches this board!!
I am about to do the 24 hour stretch to Rome from Melbourne and wonder where you bought NoJetlag?? Chemist or health shop?

Would like to try it. Anything has to be worth a try.
 
Old May 9th, 2005, 06:58 AM
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Thank you all so much for the info. I'm heading out today for the No-Jet-Lag and will definitely report back as to how we felt both coming and going. Traveling is rough no matter what, and now that you have to arrive at the airport so far in advance and stand in so many lines it all adds up.

Elaine, you sound like me. I take bags of vitamins and "just in case" pills, handiwipes, etc. Now I'm adding insect repellent as mosquitoes love me, and on another thread I was informed that I had better go prepared.

That's it, there is no more room in my suitcase. Many thanks, again!!!
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Old May 9th, 2005, 07:29 AM
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http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...s=hpc&n=507846

No Jet Lag - $7.39/pkg, qualifies for the 'free shipping' for orders over $25.
Most other websites sell it for $9.35 and up. I couldn't find it at any local stores or pharmacies.
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Old May 9th, 2005, 07:41 AM
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BTW Pam ...

I used to use Melatonin until it was pulled from the market here in Canada and the UK. It is back on the market again and I am thinking of trying it on my upcoming trip. Talk to your health food store about its benefits.

I sympathize with flying from the West coast. I moved to Victoria in December and have done three trips to Europe so far. They are SO much more difficult than flying from the East coast – that 8-9 hour time difference is killing me Heaven knows how our friends from down under cope!

Regards Ger

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Old May 9th, 2005, 08:07 AM
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I haven't tried No-Jet-Lag. I did look at their website, and, as someone who spends a lot of time reading legitimate medical literature, I will certify that the pseudoscientific claims that they offer are junk, and deceptive junk at that. There's a so-called "scientific study" on there which was made up to look like a real scientific study, but it wasn't actually published anywhere. At least, not in any journal that's in the medline database. There are no legitimate scientific data to suggest that the stuff works. Furthermore, it would have been easy for them to do a real study, and publish a paper about it, as alternative medical therapies like herbs are pretty well accepted these days, and there are peer-reviewed journals that would have accepted a real study. But they apparently chose not to submit themselves to any sort of scientific peer review.

They list the herbal ingredients in No-Jet-Lag, but they don't seem to list the amounts of each. There's no way to know if there are even any detectable amounts of any of the ingredients in the product at all. Of course, they describe their product as a "homeopathic" one. Homeopathy refers to the theory that many human afflictions can be alleviated by administering extremely minute quantities of toxic substances that, in larger doses, would actually exacerbate the problem. Sometimes just a molecule or two. Sometimes there are claims that water is somehow "imprinted" with some quantities of the substance, even though the substance isn't there any more. If you do an internet search on the subject, you'll find an incredible barrage of bizarre get-rich-quick quackery and illiterate misstatements of science that are clearly designed only to profit from people who are suffering.

To be clear, there are plenty of examples of alternative therapies that have been shown to work, including herbal medicines. Not everything that helps people comes from a pharmaceutical factory, and many effective pills got their start as herbal remedies that initially had no clear scientific explanation for their benefits. However, I'd be very skeptical about purchasing a product that has no data to support its efficacy, no rational explanation for how it might work, and whose marketing material contains a bunch of misleading pseudoscience.

Maybe it will work for you. But if I were you, I'd start by preparing my own little untested remedy, using some wheatgrass or vitamins or something, so as to save money and avoid subsidizing the people who make this stuff.
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Old May 9th, 2005, 09:54 AM
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bob_brown,
I'm a convert to the merits of glucosamine myself, for joint pain.
I've had arthritis in both knees coming on since I was in my 20s. A physical therapist who was I was seeing for an unrelated problem last year recommended glucosamine to me,and I started it as a skeptic. It took months for there to be any difference, I almost gave it up, but my knee pain has now much improved.
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