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If You Were in France, How Would You Dial This Number?

If You Were in France, How Would You Dial This Number?

Old Aug 20th, 2009, 07:11 PM
  #1  
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If You Were in France, How Would You Dial This Number?

(33) 4/90809300

This is the number given for our hotel in Avignon. I know we wouldn't have to dial the country code (33), but I'm lost after that. What does the "/" mean in the number?

I thought I had the whole zero thing figured out -- you add it if you are calling from within France but not if you are dialing from elsewhere and using the country code. Now, I'm not so sure.

Thank you to anyone who can enlighten me.
Celiaanne is offline  
Old Aug 20th, 2009, 07:55 PM
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I think you need to add a zero in front of the 4, cf. this page:

http://www.francevacationvilla.com/a...hattobring.php

(Scroll down)

I think the area code for Avignon is actually 4 90, but I'm not certain. Maybe someone else can comment.
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Old Aug 20th, 2009, 07:56 PM
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Oh, never mind. I forget numbers in France are 8 digits. So 4/ probably just means 04 is the area code for Avignon. Anyway, the link I gave you makes it clear that you need to add a 0 if you are dialing in France.
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Old Aug 20th, 2009, 08:09 PM
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Yes you must add a zero ..

When are you going to Avignon Celianne?You are going to like that city..I spent many summers at my cousin home in Avignon and have a lots of good memories.
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Old Aug 20th, 2009, 08:18 PM
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Thank you. So, I'll add a 0 before the 4 and ignore the / ?

Kismet, We are leaving on September for 3.5 weeks in France. We will only have 2 nights in Avignon after some time in Paris. But, we have a week in St. Remy and a week in Uzes, so we will get to see the surrounding area. I was in Avignon once for one awful day -- driving round and round and round trying to find the TGV station, which I found out is not IN the city.

But, we are looking forward to actually seeing at least the Palace and the Bridge this time!

Your time there sounds absolutely wonderful. That is how to "see" a city.
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Old Aug 20th, 2009, 09:19 PM
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From outside France you dial:
+ 33 490809300
("+" designates your intl access code. From the US 011, from other European countries usually 00)

Within France you dial:
0490809300

Note: 04 only designates the geographical area for this landline number. But even for "local calls", e.g. calling your hotel from a public phone at Avignon station, you dial the full 10 digits (and not only the last 8 or 6).

If you plan to bring your own mobile phone:
Save any number with a leading "+" sign, followed by country code, e.g.
US number: +1 212 555 3344
French number: +33 4 90909300
The mobile phone will "translate" the "+" sign automatically into the intl access code that is necessary from whereever you are. So you never have to think about what you have to prefix for calling the US from France or v.v., or France from Switzerland or the UK, or for calls within France.
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Old Aug 20th, 2009, 10:14 PM
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When the numbers went to 10 digits in France, the rough geographic separation became:
01 - Paris metropolitan area
02 - northwest
03 - northeast
04 - southeast
05 - southwest

All numbers that start with 06 are mobile phones.
Numbers that begin with 09 are operated through the computer networks.
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 12:20 AM
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>

The "/" is a delimiter, separating the country and region code from the phone number.

In the US we use dashes as delimiters, i.e., 212-555-1212.
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 01:15 AM
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Normally you don't see that in a number. You might see parentheses like 33 (0) 4 90 90 93 00 or
(33) 04 90 90 93 00.
In France, people mostly just use spaces to make the numbers easier to read. The main problem is that when anybody writes down foreign telephone numbers, they often tend to use the same "style" as they use in their own country -- once you have run that through two people (give a number to an English person who in turn gives it to an American) and it soon becomes impossible to decipher.
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 02:03 AM
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In France, not only do we use spaces, we actually refer to the numbers as numbers, rather than figures - i.e., the above number would be 04, ninety, ninety, ninety three, etc.

I can never understand why, when I give my number to North Americans in two digit blocks, they then try to recite it back in 3 or 4 digit numbers, like a North American one. I really don't recognize it when they say 532 9399. In fact, just writing that took about 4 tries, as it's so different from 53 29 39, etc.

And I've never seen '/' in a phone number here.
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 02:23 AM
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I had a look to the Mercure site (I found it was Mercure through the "whose number it is ?" feature of Pages Blanches) and this strange writing appears for all their hotels (at least the few ones I checked)
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 06:10 AM
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Carlux - I'm guessing the US 3 digit and then 4 digit method of giving phone numbers came originally from the use of name/letter combinations for the first 3 digits, such as Butterfield 8 then the next 4 numbers. There was a natural vocal break after the first name/letter prefix (Butterfield 8). When our phone system began to use all numbers, rather than name/number prefixes, the same inflection remained. Therefore the phone number would be designated and recited as 288 (pause) xxxx.

When you've looked at phone numbers as a grouping of 3-4 or 3-3-4 (rather than a 10 digit sequence) your entire life it's difficult to change. The North American Numbering Plan (the area code system) fits into that same sequence and reinforces the 3-4 repetition of numbers.

In short...it's tough to teach old dogs new tricks! But keep working on us - we may get it one day!
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 06:16 AM
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Well, I do know it's difficult and different - I spent most of my former life in Canada. But if I say to you my phone number is 05 53 etc., why would you say back ' just to check is that 553-3920. I just have to stop them and say - sorry, I don't have any idea. I'll read it to you again!
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 07:17 AM
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"I'm guessing the US 3 digit and then 4 digit method of giving phone numbers came originally from the use of name/letter combinations for the first 3 digits, such as Butterfield 8 then the next 4 numbers."

It was the same in Paris way back in the 60's : you would call LIT (for Littré) or BAL (for Balzac) and then 4 numbers .... so it is not a valid reason !! -
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 07:23 AM
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Celianne, you are going to love the market in Uzes..My little sister lives 40 Kilometers from that city.

I will be in Europe almost at the same times but few days later..Will arrive in Paris the 8th, then will travel with the TGV to Avignon..

This times we will stay only few days because we are going to spend a week at Grau du Roi,a charming village in La Camarque.
We were there for a week few years ago and really enjoyed it.

Afterward we are going to CT,Pescara and Rome..

Have a safe trip and enjoy La Provence..
Ciao,
AnnaMaria
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 07:34 AM
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Carlux, here in the Netherlands they say phone numbers in the same way. It still gets me if I am not thinking in Dutch though as the numbers here are given as say four and thirty not thirty-four, and I have to remember to write them down the right way round!
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 01:00 PM
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Thanks to all for the great (and interesting) information. It gets very confusing, especially as my sister will have a US mobile phone, and I will have a UK, so the accessing will be different. Wouldn't it be nice if the whole world could go on one system!

AnnaMarie, How great to have a close relative to visit. We arrive Paris on the 7th (from Pittsburgh), but we stay there for 5 nights before taking the TGV on the 12th. Your trips sounds great. Enjoy!
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 01:11 PM
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I believe your sister and you will dial the same way, whether or not one phone is from the US and one from the UK. It is where you are calling from that determines the access, not the telephone's country of origin.
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Old Aug 21st, 2009, 01:32 PM
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Nevertheless if you save the number as +33 490809300 it will work just fine too.
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Old Aug 22nd, 2009, 05:24 AM
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Nikki, I thought that the way you dialed depended on what telephone number was associated with the mobile and not where the phone was physically located. No?

In our case, one mobile has a US number and the other has a UK number.

hetismij, my sister (US phone), then does NOT have to dial 011 33 490809300 as she would from a landline phone in the US ?
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