How to Spot an American in Europe

Old May 13th, 2015, 02:51 AM
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Our daughter is bilingual French/English and attends public school in Paris. It´s interesting but when I ask her French friends if they are surprised to hear her speak English, which they rarely do, the answer is always yes, ¨it does seem a bit odd¨ they say. Her friends also uniformly point out that her voice strangely changes when she speaks English, it´s louder.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 03:14 AM
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I'm sorry Cold. My problem is that I am currently learning Spanish, and my teacher is from Colombia. She has made me aware that the United States has no word for the citizens of its country, since "Americans" is also used for all those living on the continent, north, south and central. This is apparently a matter of some grievance, since Colombians are just as much "American" as the people from the U.S. (or Canada).

In the Spanish language, the word "estadounidense" refers exclusively to citizens of the United States. Unfortunately, there is no similar word in English.

Canadians may not be as loud as people from the U.S., but they do tend to be as big. I guess the real Canadians are those without maple leaves on their backpacks.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 03:30 AM
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She has made me aware that the United States has no word for the citizens of its country, since "Americans" is also used for all those living on the continent, north, south and central.

Yankee works.

It should be noted that German, French, Russian, and a few other languages refer to folks from the United States as "American".
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Old May 13th, 2015, 03:53 AM
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Thanks Chartley. Indeed I often use "North Americans" for the same reason.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 04:19 AM
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Well
USA citizens (since Americans doesn't mean a lot) are imho just like us : some are nice, some aren't.
Just as well the ones we see on forums are like us : they are usually 'more' whatever than 'normal' people, who don't spend on internet as I and you do.
So judgments and sterotypes are even worse among us albeit we've been traveling.
But - when I'm in US I'm easily spotted as European because I look fit and well dressed, whilst in Europe they all think I'm obese and badly dressed (ehehe, I hope it sounds condescending).
I didn't find much truth in the article but ok it was fun.
Something I don't get is about NL : as Belgians, we consider Dutch people to be obsessed with money so obvisouly they will accept any kind of payment - I was in Amsterdam lately and didn't pay anything in cash (except one beer).
So it makes me wonder if 'hetismij2' you are Dutch, if I can ask ? I would write 'Ikbenhet2' to start with - something I'm missing ? in any case, het is mij gelijk maar ik vind het raar. but we say 'raar maar waar'...
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Old May 13th, 2015, 04:37 AM
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The article is only about the % of Americans the author was able to recognize. He/she missed the other 80%.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 05:13 AM
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You can complain to anyone who speaks Spanish that they impose the influence of the Spanish Church on everyone as to the way death is used, it is not a permanent state.

The word Americas includes North and South America. People in Spanish speaking countries also use norteamericano.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 05:15 AM
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She has made me aware that the United States has no word for the citizens of its country, since "Americans" is also used for all those living on the continent, north, south and central.

Look up the word American in the dictionary. I think that you will indeed find that the US does have a word for its citizens. While you´re at it, look up the in a French dictionary and you´ll find the same result. Take a look in a Spanish dictionary and I think you´ll find it there as well but it probably has the mandatory letter ¨o¨ at the end as does so many Spanish words.

America is part of the official name of the United States of America. When Columbia changes its name to Columbia of America, your Spanish teach may have a point but she would still be a Columbian. And all of those living in the USA will still be Americans.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 05:49 AM
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Excess pedantry in this thread.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 05:59 AM
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To pariswat
Outside the tourist places credit cards are in general not accepted even in Amsterdam. Everybody has a pinpas or retrieves cash from the ATM. In my non touristy Amsterdam shopping centre no one accepts creditcards, but we have 6 ATMs
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Old May 13th, 2015, 06:05 AM
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Thanks FRiet.
Really didn't know - sounds strange to me, I'm accustomed to paying everything in CC in Brussels or Paris - just paid 5 € yesterday at a Monoprix with Visa because I had no cash on me, as always...
I only went to touristy places in Amsterdam, of course...
Mc Do, one museum, one superb library, boat on the canal and ??
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Old May 13th, 2015, 06:31 AM
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For those who visit Europe and never carry cash, how do you make a donation when you visit a church? Those donations are for the upkeep of am historic building, not for the practice of religion.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 06:31 AM
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The official French term for the nationality is états-unien/états-unienne but it is almost never used except in documents that also mention 'other' Americans from those continents.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 06:49 AM
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Those donations are for the upkeep of am historic building, not for the practice of religion.

Has there ever been a more literal and appropriate application of the cliche to "Take from Peter to pay Paul."
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Old May 13th, 2015, 07:22 AM
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I'm not sue what you mean, IMDonehere, but certainly in Britain, churches and cathedrals have a historic and cultural significance that is now probably greater than their use for worship. In fact, many congregations would probably prefer somewhere more modern and cheaper to run.

Since churches seldom charge for admission, most visitors like to make a donation towards their upkeep.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 07:37 AM
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confused, I thought all Belgians were focused on money that is why all the Dutch millionaires I know live in Belgium
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Old May 13th, 2015, 07:39 AM
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If visitors pay for the upkeep, then the Church can divert funds for religious purposes since they need not pay for it. Thus the reference to the cliche which uses significant religious names.

Last year we went to St Paul's in London and to see the more popular attractions there was a fee of 18 quid. And that must be among the highest amounts for admission of any church for any denomination including 5's, 10's, and 20's.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 07:46 AM
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Egads...

It's circle time, kids. Gather around and I'll read you a story as soon as everyone's quiet.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 09:17 AM
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"As a Floridian with many tourist restaurant and bar staff hate you"

Well then isn't it about time they vented their anger at their employers who fail to pay them an adequate wages?
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Old May 13th, 2015, 01:05 PM
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I pay for belgian churches and priests whether I go there or not. It comes from my taxes.
As well as for paying the Imans, Rabbis etc.
When you organize a funeral you also have to pay to enter the Church. Don't remember how much - 100 €, 200 € or 500 € ? Forgot.
So I lost the habbit of making a donation when in a Church.
But I don't think it is the same in France.
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