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How can I get my coffee the way I like it in italy?

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Aug 26th, 2003, 11:56 AM
  #21
 
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One of the joys of going to Europe is not having to drink that murky brown water they call coffee here in the states!
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Aug 26th, 2003, 12:03 PM
  #22
 
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I too love dark Frech roast coffe that I make in my press every morning. I don't mind an espresso during that afternoon slump, but only have it when traveling. I did find that asking for a cafe latte gave me pretty much what I was looking for and was used to. We have recently purchased a Bialetti Moka pot which is a classic italian tradition of making espresso on the stovetop. So hopefully I'll develop a better appreciation of espresso before we return to Italy next year.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 12:05 PM
  #23
 
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dln

Some good suggerstions here. My hubby and I always laugh when we go to a Starbucks here in CA and hear requests like - a double decaf cap, in a mug with nonfat steamed milk, shot of sugar free vanilla, extra foam, no lid, with unsweetend coco sprinkled on top.

We love to imagine what a Florentine Barista would do or say if that request was made there. We wanted to try it out on our last trip, but neither one of us could keep a straight face.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 12:05 PM
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so a cafetiere is just an espresso machine?
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Aug 26th, 2003, 12:16 PM
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Hi MizzEve!
Yes, the small metal kind that you place on the stove.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 12:58 PM
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Calamari, My daughter who manages a Starbucks calls those a "what's the point". Usually it's a decaf triple espresso with a.....
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Aug 26th, 2003, 01:09 PM
  #27
dln
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Thank you everyone! A big cup of coffee in the morning is important. I know of course that I could get the caffeine equivalent in a little shot of expresso, but I need quantity in the morning. I like to nurse my cup of coffee slowly and with every sip I become less like and more like myself, which you know is ...

And to Patrick, now that you know why a bitty little cup of coffee wouldn't work the same magic, you will also guess that no, I don't need to have my pasta and pizza taste the exact same as it does back home! By lunchtime I have rejoined the human race and I'll eat anything an Italian chef can toss my way, any way it's made!
 
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Aug 26th, 2003, 01:41 PM
  #28
 
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Calimari ~ the link that Scarlett posted Message: http://www.showroom2001.com/produits/P19406.htm is not a kettle on a stove. It's an espresso machine. That said, what exactly is a cafetiera and please someone (I've asked this question so many times without receiving an answer) how in the world is it used?
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Aug 26th, 2003, 01:56 PM
  #29
 
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I think what we in England call a cafetiere is what is called a coffee press (or French coffee press) in the US. It's a glass coffee pot with a filter that you press down when the coffee is brewed.

I think, however, that in France a cafetiere is an espresso machine, with pressurised steam. Another example of a change of meaning as one crosses the channel.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 02:30 PM
  #30
dln
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Eve, Ruth is correct. Go to Yahoo and type in "cafetiere" and the first thing that comes up will be a hit from EBAY. Take a look. There's one with an opening bid of $6.99. All it is, is a french press. Although if you look at the other sites that come up under Yahoo, you'll see that the French consider it more of a coffee maker, the kind you plug in.

But I'll tell you what I'm doing because you, like me, know what the "ritual" bit of having a big cup of coffee is! My friend brought over her coffee press and immersion heater to me this afternoon. I think she had ESP that I was undergoing coffee anxiety, because she rescued me! If you visit the website Magellens (the travel catalog people) you will find a coffee making kit with the heater, scoop, and french press. All you need to do is either bring your own coffee if you're picky, or buy it in Italy. I'm going to buy mine at the Standa store in Trastavere. BTW, we arrive in Roma on the 5th for four nights, and then we're back on the 17th, departing on Thursday 18th, early.
 
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Aug 26th, 2003, 02:50 PM
  #31
 
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When I was in Italy, all of the hotels I stayed in did have a breakfast included. It was always a choice of coffee and a basket of breakfast-type breads and rolls. The great part is that they would deliver it to your room if you asked at no charge. I would have a lot of trouble even making it out of my room in the morning if I didn't have my coffee so I understand dln's dilema.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 03:20 PM
  #32
 
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One of the things I like to buy when I'm overseas is coffee from the grocery store to bring back. I can't drink Folder's or Maxwell House -- it's too gross. But I can buy decent coffee in Europe (England, Germany, or France and I'm betting in the places I haven't been yet as well).

And being able to get a cup of cafe latte or cappucino any where is really wonderful. I was so disappointed on my first trip to England when I ordered a coffee with my desert at dinner and got served AMERICAN style coffee instead of the wonderful stuff they had been serving us for breakfast.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 03:56 PM
  #33
 
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I always bring my "kettle" with me even if there is a coffee maker in the room. Ever had it broken and had to wait till they replace it when somebody who's responsible comes to work at noon?
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Aug 26th, 2003, 04:11 PM
  #34
 
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My wife screamed with delight when she read NYCfoodsnob's coffee thread to MissEve. One of her favorite things to do in Europe is to try new brands of beans and compare. You should see our freezer. I don't drink coffee but my wife doesn't go anywhere without her Bialetti that she picked up in Rome 4 years ago. When NYC suggested Morganti beans, my wife screamed because she hadn't heard of it and had to try it. It's the most expensive coffee I've ever purchased (shipping) but nothing's too expensive for my girl.The beans are on their way. I'll let you all know what she thinks after she's tasted a brew.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 04:16 PM
  #35
 
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dln, that's just about what I have, except with half-and-half instead of milk, along with 2-3 cubes of sugar (I became a cubist after my visit to France.)

In Italy, I've found that two cappucini is a great way to kick off my day. It's not like I need the extra caffeine; they're just so delicious I can't have only one.
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Aug 26th, 2003, 04:29 PM
  #36
 
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I now ask for 2-3 shots of espresso in a large cup (normal size cup by American standards~it's usually filled about 1/2 way or so), and a side of steamed milk. They always give sugar on the side (and sometimes little squares of chocolate). Then I add the steaming milk and sugar to just the right ratio for my taste. It's a hot, good, strong, rich cup of joe. Now, I even order my coffee this way in the States since I get so much variation on a simple latte depending where I go and who makes it. Actually if I go to traditional european cafes, they always make good lattes and cappucinos, but when I go to places with more American patrons I think they often try to make coffee the way they THINK we like it. There lies the problem......
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Aug 26th, 2003, 04:41 PM
  #37
 
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Dln,
An espresso contains much less caffeine than a standard "continental" coffee, this probably explains why Scarlet can still fall asleep at night.
I also think that a Caffelatte cannot fulfil your morning needs as it's just an espresso sunk in a large amount of milk.
I am not able to accomplish my coffee expectations abroad as well.
Why not a cup of tea, instead ?
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Aug 26th, 2003, 05:09 PM
  #38
 
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Dln -- Your hotel breakfasts will provide no problem as they are geared to travelers from other nations. Just ask for either "cafe americano" with extra "latet caldo" or get a double capuccino.

In the street the baristas will do so grudgingly, because as was mentioned it takes the average Italian about 30 seconds to drink his espresso and gobble down his broche or sfogliatellini.

We know you leave shortly so _ buon viaggio!!!!!!
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Aug 26th, 2003, 05:10 PM
  #39
dln
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Ducky dear, you've got to be kidding!!! As do the Italians with no cappucino after 11 am, so does dln: no tea before 11 am!
 
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Aug 26th, 2003, 05:28 PM
  #40
 
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Mmmm choosey, indeed.
I'm afraid McD is your last chance.
(disposable big cups ... brrr )
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