Honeymoon in Czech Republic/Germany

Aug 30th, 1999, 11:40 AM
  #1  
DC
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Honeymoon in Czech Republic/Germany

My fiance and I would like to take a 2 week trip on our honeymoon to the Czech Republic and Germany in June, 2000. Neither of us has been to Europe before. We do not want to travel on a typical tour bus, but would need some limited guidance during our stay. Any suggestions on tours/accommodations/cities to visit?

Thanks!
 
Aug 30th, 1999, 12:09 PM
  #2  
Ben Haines
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Sorry: I'm feeling a bit dim this evening. Can you tell us what you have in mind as to "some limited guidance" ? Every old city in your two countries offers two-hour guided tours on foot or by bus or both most mornings or all. Again, each of them has an information office with English-speaking staff who are glad to say what's in the area and how to get there.

In general, Germany has more people who speak English, and costs more, than the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic has plenty of old cities and towns that were never bombed. Both countries have hotels from two star to five star. If you'll be in the hotel a lot you may want three star at least, 150 dollars a night for a double in Germany and Prague, and 50 in the Czech Republic outside Prague. But if you'll go out a lot then two star is fine, at bout 100 in Germany and 35 in the Republic outside Prague.

While we await your guidance may I mention that Cesky Budejovice in southern Bohemia has a fine central square itself, and is an hour by bus or train from beautiful woods, villages, castles, a monastery, and a carp lake. And Olomouc in Moravia is a little visited Baroque city, with not a lot to do, but excellent to stroll in.

Welcome to Europe.

Ben Haines, London

 
Aug 30th, 1999, 12:09 PM
  #3  
Ben Haines
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Sorry: I'm feeling a bit dim this evening. Can you tell us what you have in mind as to "some limited guidance" ? Every old city in your two countries offers two-hour guided tours on foot or by bus or both most mornings or all. Again, each of them has an information office with English-speaking staff who are glad to say what's in the area and how to get there.

In general, Germany has more people who speak English, and costs more, than the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic has plenty of old cities and towns that were never bombed. Both countries have hotels from two star to five star. If you'll be in the hotel a lot you may want three star at least, 150 dollars a night for a double in Germany and Prague, and 50 in the Czech Republic outside Prague. But if you'll go out a lot then two star is fine, at bout 100 in Germany and 35 in the Republic outside Prague.

While we await your guidance may I mention that Cesky Budejovice in southern Bohemia has a fine central square itself, and is an hour by bus or train from beautiful woods, villages, castles, a monastery, and a carp lake. And Olomouc in Moravia is a little visited Baroque city, with not a lot to do, but excellent to stroll in.

Welcome to Europe.

Ben Haines, London

 
Aug 30th, 1999, 12:49 PM
  #4  
DC
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Thank you, Ben.

I guess what I mean is that we don't want to be stuck on a tour bus for the duration of our stay. We want to be able to explore on our own, and perhaps meet up with a tour group or guide for part of our trip. That way, we won't miss anything, we won't feel lost, and we wouldn't have to follow a "structured" trip. I know that some tour companies offer "self-guided tours." They give recommendations on sites to see, and book you in specific hotels or inns, and you don't have to follow a group for the entire trip. This is whatI mean by "limited guidance."



 
Aug 30th, 1999, 01:54 PM
  #5  
Ben Haines
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Many thanks for this swift and useful reply. I'm afraid I can't answer you: I don't know the companies that do this. Would it be any good to buy the Lonely Planet guide to Central Europe, read over the chapters for Germany and the Czech Republic, and book yourselves a week in each of two cities ? Then you could take quite a lot of the two hour tours that I mention, or one day bus tours into the countryside, and talk to those follow passengers who have English.

But it does seem likely that a North American reader of this forum will know a firm of the kind you want.

Ben Haines

 
Aug 31st, 1999, 02:20 PM
  #6  
peb
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DC,
I'm a strong believer in not going on structured tours. My wife and I just came back from our first European trip . . . three weeks in Berlin, Krakow, Austria, and Czech Republic. There is no question, after seeing the throngs of tour groups in Prague and going on one half-day structured bus excursion in Salzburg (the Sound of Music of course) that we would not go in a tour group for an extended period -- nevermind for a honeymoon!

With some background research, such as Ben's suggestions of reading Lonely Planet, reading this board, etc. the scares are really removed from trip planning.

In general, the inter-city train systems are very easy to use. Take advantage of the German rail timetable at http://www.bahn.de/home_e/f-engl.htm which includes destinations in all of Europe. Let it help you plan your itinerary. To help you when you are in Europe, print off some of the intinerary pages before you leave and keep them so when you are at, say, the Munich train station, you can jot down your destination, time and date of trip to the clerk and he can easily prepare your ticket.

Don't let the language barrier intimidate you from going alone. Although, if you know a few words (please, thank you, excuse me, sorry, hello, etc.) of Czech or German it will help things. Believe it or not, we noticed that menus were printed in English in even the smallest Czech towns, but not one menu we saw in Berlin had more than German.

That's some "guidance", if you want more email me and I will try and help.
 
Aug 31st, 1999, 03:26 PM
  #7  
alan
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Hi! I just read your posting. My wife and I have been traveling in Europe since 1986 and always by car, except when we went to Prague and London. I would strongly suggest buying a couple of good guide books such as lonely planet, fodors or rough guides. I also like to use Michelin green guides. Traveling by car enhances the travel, a good map of the countries you are visiting is important also. The above postings are good and accurate, you have to decide what you prefer to see. Germany is one of our favorite places and the prices outside of the major cities are more inexpensive. We are visiting the Chzech Rep for the first time in about 3 weeks. We plan to spend 10 days exploring by car.One of the things that we do is that when we go to a major city, we take a city tour that gives you a flavor of the city. These may only take 1-2 hours. We also don't stay in American Hotels, both because of price and I can get bacon and eggs at home. I prefer the local owned hotels and restaurants. In most of our traveling in Eastern Europe, we have found speaking a few words in German more helpful than English. The communists taught students German or Russian rather than English. The younger people will speak some English and the older people usually none. After you visit eastern europe it become infectious and we have been going there since 1992. We have traveled to Slovenia, Hungary 2x, Slovakia, southern Poland and Prague. The hotel prices are reasonable as are the restaurants, except for Prague and Ljubijana where hotels were western priced. Germany is a large country and you have to decide where you will be visiting. In 10 days it may be best to visit Bavaria and go to the Czech Rep from. Otherwise Congratulations and enjoy alan
 
Aug 31st, 1999, 06:07 PM
  #8  
Don
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My wife and I spent a week in this year.
It was our first time there so we hired a guide. It was well worth it. If you are intereseted, e-mail me and I will give you some information.
 
Sep 1st, 1999, 08:29 PM
  #9  
cherie
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We have been to Prague, Budejejovice, and all around Moravia with friends who live there. In fact, they were recently visiting us here in the US. Prague is easy to navigate- they have excellent subway system, buses, etc. Many people speak English; restaurants are becoming more tourist-friendly since the Communists left. Be sure and go to the industrial museum in Prague---there are fine examples of everything imaginable: 2Bugattis, a Mercedes Racer fromn the 30s; the Bleriot XI, railcars, even mundane items like a jar of contact lenses! Shop for crystal at Moser; go see the old Jewish Section and its museum; the clock tower and the famous Charles Bridge, the Alchemist's Alley and the Castle, etc. And be sure do try the beer....U Flecu is a good choice. The Czechs have the best beers!
 
Sep 2nd, 1999, 03:12 PM
  #10  
turnip
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DC, I tried your e-mail address only to have it returned. If you'd like some other opinions drop me a line.
 
Sep 5th, 1999, 08:11 AM
  #11  
Lyn
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Dear DC,
I couldn't help you with the guided tours part, but I just got back from an extensive amount of time in Northern/Central Germany and I would recommend seeing Berlin, if possible. It is a truly chaotic, but wonderful city. While there, catch Unter den Linden, Brandenburger Tuer, and the Berliner Dom. Also, if you feel like taking a small detour just out of Berlin to Potsdam, see Schloss Sans Souci. But don't get burned: tix for tours of inside Sans Souci sell out FAST. Get there in ther morning and do Sans Souci itself first. Then look around the grounds.
Anyway, I hope that sort of helps.
Best Wishes, Lyn
 

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