flying with food

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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:24 AM
  #1
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flying with food

Hi know from flying in and out of the Carribean and Hawaii that there are strict rules on what food, fruit, etc. that you cannot bring into the country.

We're flying to London from the US - is it any problem to pack stuff like peanut butter, crackers, granola bars, etc. in our checked luggage? No fruit or vegetables (obviously...would hate to see what they'd look like after flying so long in my suitcase).
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:29 AM
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Why even consider it? You can buy such things in the UK.
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:32 AM
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ira
 
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Hi K,

>is it any problem to pack stuff like peanut butter, crackers, granola bars, etc. in our checked luggage?<

Are you talking about enough to last for several weeks? If so, you can buy these goods in Europe.

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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:36 AM
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OK - you want to use valuable luggage space for -- peanut butter and granoal bars??

Now if you wanted peanut butter/crackers to nibble on the flight - that might make sense. But there are supermarkets in the UK afterall . . . . .
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:38 AM
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there are also lots of rules about bringing food into the US, too, and not just Hawaii.

Padraig,

what brand of peanut butter would you recommend BTW????
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:39 AM
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Janis, please...not everybody stuffs their luggage with designer handbags like you do LOL.
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:59 AM
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Peanut butter, granola bars, crackers are indeed readily available in regular London supermarkets, unless you want Wheat Thins. It's one thing I miss from US and while I found them at a specialty grocery with other "American" foods such as pancake mix and box mac and cheese, they were 5 pounds for a box (US$10!).
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Jun 28th, 2007, 08:59 AM
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Dukey, I have no recommendations on brands of peanut butter. I don't eat the stuff.

I don't know if the brands available in Britain are the same as in the US, but I think some of them are.
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Jun 28th, 2007, 09:06 AM
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Your post reminded me of this you tube thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlGnaHWVLDA

(I know it is mean that they put Stupid in the title, but I still think it's funny.)
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Jun 28th, 2007, 09:06 AM
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Dukey: I don't "stuff" my bags w/ anything, don't check bags at all, and don't take designer bags on most trips - my faithful old le Sport Sac goes on most trips . . . .

(I leave the good stuff at home)
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Jun 28th, 2007, 11:20 AM
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Wow, I didn't know such a question would result in such responses. I wonder if some of you know how nasty you can sound? I know the written word is hard to interpret and it's very possible there was no nastiness intended.

We usually pack a box of granola bars, crackers and peanut butter so we at least have something for the boys to eat once we arrive.

I hope you know that I know there are supermarkets in Britain. But after being jetlagged and finding our way about, this way it won't be one of the first things we have to do.

And no, not enought to last several weeks. One box of granola bars, one box of crackers, one small jar of pb and a few ziploc bags and napkins is what we bring. Hardly "valuable luggage space".

Sigh.

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Jun 28th, 2007, 11:27 AM
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Karens,

Maybe the key is to be more specific. Packing food could mean everything from enough for the airport to enough for a month. Lots of people discuss bringing tons of food with them on vacation, so people need a little more specificity.
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Jun 28th, 2007, 11:30 AM
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as I clearly meant - a small amount for the flight/arrival makes some sense.

But you made it sound like you wanted to bring a lot and put it in your checked bags.

I'd never bring so much, it needed to be checked . . . . .
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Jun 28th, 2007, 11:34 AM
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Karens - I was getting the same impression. Then again, it's the same group that jumps all over anyone asking a question they consider "gauche" or "bourgeois
". There is a pervasive snob faction on this board and it would really be nice if they had their own seperate little board to belittle those that aren't the jetsetters they seem to believe they are.

I would like tyo know the answer too. That "valuable" luggage space that food might occupy on the trip over can be filled with similar or nicer souvenirs on the return. If you were flying into any other airport in Europe I know you could bring in food in your checked bags as long as it isn't fruits or veggies and as long as the container isn't open. But the UK is much stricter. I would do a Google search - I'm betting that you can bring in your own snacks in your checked stuff. Most of the time Customs doesn't even look unless you act suspiciously. Besides, what could they object to? Someone bringing actual good food into England should be commended.
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Jun 28th, 2007, 11:51 AM
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karens wrote: "I wonder if some of you know how nasty you can sound? I know the written word is hard to interpret and it's very possible there was no nastiness intended."

Was I nasty? It certainly was not my intention.

You have to bear in mind that people who ask questions here range from the very knowledgeable to the amazingly ill-informed, and that we who live in Europe are invited to deal with questions that reveal jaw-dropping ignorance of what things are like here.

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Jun 28th, 2007, 12:03 PM
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Karens -

I have packed both my carry-on and checked baggage with items that you have mentioned, with no problem. I agree, its nice to have a healthy snack in your room upon arrival so that you don't have to venture out upon arrival AND don't have to pay the outrageous hotel fees for snacks that is only compounded by the ever-sinking dollar.

Enjoy your snacks and ignore the nasty remarks. It seems that some of these folks have nothing better to do than sit and criticize others for a "non" living. In my opinion, you come into this blog looking for positive advice and no question is too ignorant. I wonder what these folks are like in person?!
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Jun 28th, 2007, 12:05 PM
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Hi Karens,

I don't think you'll have a problem with the food you want to pack. I have a friend who likes to bring snacks like, chips, granola bars, and even a bag of popcorn on board, so I doubt you'll have any trouble checking those items in. Also, I have friends who pack some of those microwavable Indian meals that come in a small sealed box when they return so if they don't have problems with those I doubt you'll have trouble with peanut butter and crackers.

Have a great trip!
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Jun 28th, 2007, 12:10 PM
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I have a friend who lives in London who brings an empty suitcase with her to the states to fill with peanut butter (Jif), wheat thins, grits, Kraft mac and cheese, balance bars, and other such delicacies that she either can't get or can't afford in London.

I travel with protein bars to keep my husband happy between meals -- much easier and cheaper than having to stop and eat every time he gets hungry

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Jun 28th, 2007, 12:24 PM
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It's funny...I was just at the supermarket a few hours ago buying a few things for our trip to London next week. While of course there are lots of very nice supermarkets in London, I too like to bring a few items, esp for the kids. For one thing, I don't want to rush to a supermarket on arrival plus some brands are not available in London, esp the kinds of cereal my kids like. And to be honest, it's much cheaper here! Everything I take will stay in the apartment we are renting for the next tenant and thus I do not feel like I'm wasting any speace at all. After all, luggage space is premium only on the return journey!

To answer the main question, I believe if you want to be absolutely certain, a Google search is in order, as another poster suggested. Anecdotally, I have taken into London (not all at once!) the following items without incident: cereal, snack bars, tea (my fave brand), instant coffee, Nesquick (kind of instant cocoa drink), milk boxes (when kids were younger these were essential), and dried pasta/rice.

Enjoy your trip
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Jun 28th, 2007, 12:28 PM
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I bring Oreo's back to me from the US to Switzerland. I am dying to try the limited edition strawberry milkshake ones. Also almond M&Ms for a coworker who discovered them on vacation a few years ago.
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