flu shot in the UK?

Sep 11th, 2006, 09:09 PM
  #1  
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flu shot in the UK?

I'm studying in England for a year ... I've always gotten the flu shot in the US, but I can't now as it isn't ready. Will I be able to get the flu shot in the UK? I'm registered in NHS with my GP in college ... can I get it there? Would I be charged? Will I not be able to get it since I'm not a baby or over 65?
JoeTro is offline  
Sep 11th, 2006, 11:03 PM
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Ask your GP.

Some GPs have very low thresholds for non-elderly priority groups: people with high blood pressure, or allergies for example.

If yours hasn't, either he'll do it privately (£20-£40) or he or his receptionist will have a list of local private clinics who'll do it for the same price.
flanneruk is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 05:23 AM
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It's unlikely you'll get a free flu shot as they are reserved for at-risk people, not healthy adults.
nona1 is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 05:24 AM
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By the way it is not a normal thing for healthy adults to have a flu shot here, that is why you would have to pay. I don't know anyone who has one bar my parents who are nearing 80.
nona1 is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 07:21 AM
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Thanks. I was thinking that maybe they were reserved for older people. In America, it's recommended that everyone gets one, and I'd definitely want to have one. I don't mind paying if need be.
JoeTro is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 07:33 AM
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Actually in the States, depending on where you live, flu shots are also often limited to those w/ health issues, babies, and the elderly. It is "suggested" that everyone get them but in fact only those at risk are guaranteed to have them.
janisj is online now  
Sep 12th, 2006, 07:53 AM
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Actually in the States, the Center for Disease Control recommends the following categories of people (and those who live and/or care for them) get a yearly flu shot:

Children aged 659 months,
Pregnant women,
People 50 years of age and older, and
People of any age with certain chronic medical conditions;
People who live in nursing homes and other long term care facilities.

If the vaccine is in short supply, there's no guarantee that anyone will get it.

And 50 isn't elderly.
obxgirl is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 08:06 AM
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I used to think that 50 was really really old. I don't anymore.

I'm self employed some of the time, and when I am I get the shot privately. I usually pay around £40 for it from my GP- which is a reasonable insurance premium against the potential loss of two weeks wages or a contract.

I get mine done either by my GP privately or at the big private walk in medical centre at Waterloo. There are similar clinics all over London - these charge about £100 at most.

When I am on the payroll I just take the chance.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 08:09 AM
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It might be different in England but I'd ask your doctor.
Yes, EVERYONE should have the shot, and THIS year, unlike the past couple of years, there is apparently plenty of the vaccine and it is out early. (this from a friend who is "high up" in this issue and should know).
The restrictions may not apply to certain ages as previously...but then I'm certainly not sure)
This doesn't answer your question for England..."sorry"...but I would think the private doctors there would do it for a price (just like in the U.S.)
mari5 is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 09:28 AM
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As a student I'd recommend getting a jab against meningitis.

Every year when the new folk arrive there are several hundred cases throughout the country.

And it isn't very pleasant though it does get you out of classes
alanRow is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 09:57 AM
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"Yes, EVERYONE should have the shot". Why?

But of course if you want it, go ahead. I'm not saying don't, but I also don't agree that it is a neccessity for most people.
nona1 is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 10:13 AM
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JoeTro -

don;t know where you're from but in the US it is not reco'd that everyone get flu shots. They are recommended for seniors, very young children and adults with underlying chronic diseases.

It is not recommended that healthy adults get them -

#1 because they're not really necessary and are only partially useful (depending on which strain of flu turns ups)

#2 there is usually a shortage of vaccine - with even senior clincs often not able to get enough

Last year it was being rationed among even the elderly - can;t imagine where/how you found an MD willing or able to give it to you.

(My parents - in their 80's - had to register for a lottery at their seniot citizen center - since there simply wasn;t enough vaccine for everyone.
nytraveler is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 10:30 AM
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>>It is not recommended that healthy adults get them -

#1 because they're not really necessary and are only partially useful (depending on which strain of flu turns ups)

#2 there is usually a shortage of vaccine - with even senior clincs often not able to get enough <<

Would you quote your source on this please?

Here's mine from the CDC:

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm
obxgirl is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 10:39 AM
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Re flu jabs, they are recommended for places like colleges & universities because of the sheer number of people living at close quarters and because the student's immune systems are already having to cope with new varients of existing bugs from the new-comers
alanRow is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:11 AM
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alanRow, that's a good recommendation about the meningitis shot. These are now recommended here in the US, but don't get much publicity and so a lot of people don't know about them.
Barbara is online now  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:18 AM
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Yes, when I was in college my date for the Psi Upsilon SnowBall came down with meningitis. Dozens of us had to go to the emergency room and have nasal swabs (the kind where they go WAY up there) and those of us who were in closest proximity to MM (Meningitis Man, as he was known thereafter) had to take some very expensive drugs for several days. One other person did develop it. Fortunately both of them recovered, but it is extremely dangerous.
BTilke is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:24 AM
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Here in Spain everybody gets it for free at the GP. Of course, it is specially advisable for elders, but there's no age limit (under or above) to get it. You just can't get it whenever you want, just in the months indicated by them.
kenderina is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:33 AM
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From the CDC site:
-------
June 30, 2006
How much influenza vaccine is projected to be available for the 2006-07 influenza season?
At the current time, influenza vaccine manufacturers are projecting that approximately 100 million doses of influenza vaccine will be available in the U.S. for use during the 2006-07 influenza season. This amount represents approximately 16% more doses than were available for the 2005-06 season. An additional 15 million to 20 million doses may be available if a new vaccine is licensed in 2006.
------------------

There will be flu vaccine for about one third of the population in the US. Obviously, it is not expected that everyone will be vaccinated and the same rules will be in effect as prior years.

In early November two years ago a friend in her late 60s and a breast cancer survivor got her flu shot in London because not enough was available in Massachusetts before her trip. She had to pay in excess of $50.
jsmith is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:43 AM
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My understanding in the UK is that the over 60's, and people with chronic conditions are given first priority. After that it is first come first served and no charge if registered with an NHS GP.

I would go to the college and ask the nurse there about availability. I would imagine that a large university with halls of residence would be keen to dispense this if it is available. BTW last year it was in very short supply but the year before there was lots.
cambe is offline  
Sep 12th, 2006, 11:57 AM
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Where I live in the UK a free flu vac is also offered to those with asthma.

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