First time in Paris, 3 days only

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Sep 7th, 1997, 08:30 AM
  #1
Diane
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First time in Paris, 3 days only

I have a weekend in Paris during a business trip. It's my first time ever, and is also a long awaited dream come true. I don't want to wreck it by trying to squeeze every single attraction into three days....what are the two or three things I MUST do? And then, where should I hang out, eat, walk-around, for the true Parisian experience (not the the true tourist one!) Many thanks.
 
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Sep 7th, 1997, 05:41 PM
  #2
JOAN DOYLE
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Dear Diane: You do pose a problem--Paris in THREE DAYS! You'll probably hear from lots of other travelers in this Lounge but, for my part, I'd stay on the Left Bank (where there are LOTS of good restaurants you can find by just wandering down an attractive street and reading the menu). I'd want to at least SEE Notre Dame, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, possibly Sacre Coeur. You'll find just BEING THERE exciting. Enjoy. Joan
 
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Sep 8th, 1997, 08:28 PM
  #3
Donna
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Three days only...we were in Paris last year for seven and are going back next year for ten to see SOME of the things we missed! Highly recommend that you get yourself at least two or three tour guides and peruse them in depth to determine what most appeals to you. Upon arrival, I personally recommend that you head straight for PARISTORIC, a multimedia presentation in a modern theater located at 11bis rue Scribe (around the corner from Opera Garnier). Presented on the hour 9-9 seven days a week. Having seen this, you'll know what you will not want to miss. Our favorite experiences were: the top level of the Eiffel Tower (try to go before dusk, when the daylight is best, and stay till after dark and all the lights have been turned on), the view from the rooftop cafe at La Samaritaine Department store, Musee d'Orsay, Sainte Chappelle, boat cruise along the Seine just before dusk, the Champs Elysee (ignore the tour guides, it's fabulous) and the Arc de Triomphe, Jardin de Tuileries, rue Rivoli (again ignore the tour guides) and Opera Garnier. Be SURE to find a terrific sidewalk cafe and spend a couple of hours enjoying your favorite beverage and watching the passing parade (our favorites: Chez Francis near Pont de l'Alma and Deux Magots). A nighttime stroll along the Pont Alexandre III. You will want to have fabulous meals, of course. No matter where you happen to be, wander a block or two off the beaten path and have a look at the posted menus and interiors - and enter if you find it appealing! Even if you only wander around for three days, you'll have the experience of a lifetime!
 
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Sep 10th, 1997, 05:19 PM
  #4
diane
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Joan and Donna, thanks so much for your kind messages. I'll be going in a week and have printed out your emails to take with me. Merci beaucoup! D.
 
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Sep 10th, 1997, 05:33 PM
  #5
Steve
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Only one thing to add -- the Musee d'Orsay, which holds many wonderful impressionist works, is just across the Seine from the Louvre. If you want a relaxing view from the Eiffel Tower, the Jules Verne restaurant is quite good (if a bit pricey).
 
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Sep 11th, 1997, 05:48 PM
  #6
Diane
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Thank you, Steve. I will be sure to get to the Museum. D.
 
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Sep 12th, 1997, 04:48 AM
  #7
Neal Sanders
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Who wouldn't want to give advice to a first-time Paris visitor? I expected your question to draw a gaggle of comments from readers; it didn't so here is my two cents worth. First, invest $7.95 or whatever the current price is, for a Falk's Plan de Paris. It gives you every street in the city -- legibly -- and will last you through the many trips you will take there. Second, the above advice is, with minor nit-picking, excellent. I would skip Sacre Coeur (nice view, but an ugly 1920's-era church and a pain in the rear to get to). I would add a stop at Galeries Lafayette. This is Paris' biggest department store; it is a grand 19th century structure with a beautiful rotunda and stained-glass ceiling. They are sufficiently tourist-oriented that you can do VAT refunds on the spot. GF is about two blocks from the old Opera house with it's Chagall murals. The Louvre is a mammoth structure, but there is a highlights map available at the entrance that will steer you to the principal attractions like the Mona Lisa and Nike of Samothrace. At the Musee de Orsay (don't even think about going to Paris without going there!) head straight for the top floor, which houses the heart of the Impressionists works. The Tuilleries may be at their best in September: the gardens get replanted and the Parisians have all returned. Enjoy the trip; may it be the first of many.
 
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Sep 12th, 1997, 10:30 PM
  #8
Julian
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I agree with others. Just being there - magnifique! Passing advice - definitley, must be our absolute love of the place. You're going to have a fabulous time. Be prepared to walk - great way to see the real Paris. Eiffel Tower - definite at dusk as mentioned. Louvre - an experience, but tiring so be specific about what area you may want to see. Jardine du Luxembourg, or other gardens are an experience worth soaking in, weather permitting. Arc de Triomphe in the evening - that traffica around the circle is something else! Champs de Elyesse - agree. Laft Bank cafes. Enjoy. Green with envy.
 
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Sep 13th, 1997, 11:09 AM
  #9
Julian
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Forgot a few favourites. Try the Rue Moufetard in the Jardin des Plantes Quarter, a street market mainly food, but with some good restaurants in the area for dinner. Walk around the Marais district - charming, old and quaint with good shops. St Severin Church in the Latin Quarter is close to the Notre Dame, and far less crowded, but also very old. We enjoyed Musee Rodin - if you like sculpture, and the garden is great for a picninc - a must in one of the gardens in Paris. Bon voyage - and oh yes, do try and speak a little of the language. People really do appreciate it, and it "opens doors" when you make the effort.
 
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Sep 13th, 1997, 11:09 AM
  #10
Julian
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Forgot a few favourites. Try the Rue Moufetard in the Jardin des Plantes Quarter, a street market mainly food, but with some good restaurants in the area for dinner. Walk around the Marais district - charming, old and quaint with good shops. St Severin Church in the Latin Quarter is close to the Notre Dame, and far less crowded, but also very old. We enjoyed Musee Rodin - if you like sculpture, and the garden is great for a picninc - a must in one of the gardens in Paris. Bon voyage - and oh yes, do try and speak a little of the language. People really do appreciate it, and it "opens doors" when you make the effort.
 
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