Fanny pack - yes or no?

Feb 12th, 2006, 11:54 AM
  #21  
 
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Don't get me wrong when I call it a purse. That's just our joking name for it. This is the type of thing he has. Buy it in black and he'll blend right in with everone else on the street.

http://www.eaglecreek.com/40242.html

Just go out and buy one and bring it home. My husband also had apprehensions at first about carrying an accessory that he thought only a woman would carry. Perhaps it is a generational thing in the US (we're in our 50s). Now on trips he can't live without it. Also, these do look more like a camera bag than a real purse.

As far as the fanny pack, I used one on our bike trip in the Loire and it was perfect for that.
julies is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 11:59 AM
  #22  
 
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Julies: The man purse is a MURSE!
ekscrunchy is online now  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:19 PM
  #23  
 
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Purse, murse, messenger bag, Kelly bag -- whatever ---

A long as I don't have to carry his stuff!
Worktowander is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:35 PM
  #24  
 
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It would have to be a NO for a guy to carry a fanny pack. But I think it's totally ok for a woman to carry one. I've been getting compliments and being stopped on the streets of NY about my fanny pack. The trick is to get a very stylish one like LV or Gucci then no one will like it's tacky but quite fashionable. You can have your wallet stolen at home just the same as on vacation. Just be more aware of your surrounding and belongings.
Raineydae is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:42 PM
  #25  
 
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If you don't wear a fanny pack or carry a messenger bag, no one will ever suspect you're a tourist - and therefore you won't be a crime target.

Right.

By the way, I think "Fanny" has been the title of enough novels, plays, movies, and musicals over the past three or four hundred years that it's high time the Brits get done with the giggling and go back to using "bum" - or the more colloquial "arse" - for "rump" (is this similar to Eskimos having dozens of words for "snow"?)
Robespierre is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:46 PM
  #26  
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a murse! who knew?

I told DH that votes were pretty overwhelmingly against on this forum, so he shrugged and said OK.

And, I do not carry his stuff, I have enough of my own . I found a pretty nice messenger bag at ebags, http://www.ebags.com/, although zappos, http://www.zappos.com would have nice ones as well.
Momliz is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:50 PM
  #27  
 
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The British love toilet humour. Fanny is a euphamism for a vagina so no wonder it gets a chuckle every time.
henneth is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 12:52 PM
  #28  
 
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My husband has started wearing one when we take the dog for long walks, usually in Brussels or somewhere in Germany. I don't like it, but I'm not going to bug him about it. If a thief snatches it, all he'll get is a small water bottled (with tap water), a mini plastic Ikea water bowl (4 for 1 euro), a couple of poop cleanup bags, and some paper towels. A rather disappointing haul, and not worth p*ssing off a 6'2" 200 pound half-German for, IMHO.
BTilke is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 01:53 PM
  #29  
 
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No they may not look great but they're very utilitarian.

After using a shoulder bag to carry things like wallets, water bottle, book, maps, my shoulder started to hurt.

Plus for things like your money clip and keys, the pack worn on the front made for easy access.

Now imagine carrying around camera and iPod as well as the usual tourist stuff.

I used a messenger bag along with camera clipped to belt. Then I could keep keys and wallet in my coat for easy access. That combo works in winter but in summer, you need something else.

I can see using it again in the summer for long excursions where I'm on my feet all day.

And Europeans absolutely use them, but some of them are nice leather things, with muted colors and design.

They also wear backpacks on the front to prevent theft.
wco81 is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 08:26 PM
  #30  
 
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Suze: Actually the liner is for "moisture". Now, I don't intend on sweating in my money belt in 40 and 50 degree weather. And it can definitely get wet from rain under your clothes. Imagine being stuck in a downpour unexpectedly. If your shirt gets drenched, so will the belt. Or, maybe you get in a water fight why doing the utmost touristy thing like pedal boating in Amsterdam. Or, maybe you stand under the Manekin Pis haha, actually, he is so small, it would just be a trickle.
TamaraEden is offline  
Feb 12th, 2006, 08:43 PM
  #31  
 
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Oh my.. I wouldnt caught dead in one...usually.. but have finally found an appropriate place...Biking in the country or hiking in the high alps!!!..it's a great way to carry your poncho,medicine bandaids socks,snack,water,map,camera,sun and field glasses..it goes with my double bottom lined stretch knee pants....and knee socks...and felt hat with a feather..i love to go a wandering..
hypatia is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 06:00 AM
  #32  
 
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Packs or fannypacks or murses or...Not needed in cities for us--I mean, how far are you from a water source just about anywhere in Paris or Rome?

I wear clothing with pockets--they hold everything I need (and everything Mrs. Fly needs when her outfit does not have enough pockets) for an urban outing--including our camera. One less item to worry about losing, dropping, lugging around.
RufusTFirefly is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 06:08 AM
  #33  
 
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Robespierre said:
"By the way, I think "Fanny" has been the title of enough novels, plays, movies, and musicals over the past three or four hundred years that it's high time the Brits get done with the giggling and go back to using "bum" - or the more colloquial "arse" - for "rump" (is this similar to Eskimos having dozens of words for "snow"?)"

Actually, 'bumbag' is indeed our name for your 'fanny pack'. And as someone else pointed out, Fanny, whilst being a rather old fashioned name (Victorian parlour maids spring to mind), is also most certainly NOT another word for 'arse'. Think 'front' bottom...
Kate is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 07:18 AM
  #34  
 
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I see that the first (and usually only) definition in dictionaries is "buttocks." A small number of dictionaries give "vulva" (and only as a second definition). So it certainly IS another word for "arse" (besides being my aunt's given name).
Robespierre is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 07:20 AM
  #35  
 
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What on earth is a fanny pack? A daypack à la Eastpack?
A stylish and safe alternative is to use a small size messenger bag (20 x 30 cm). Manhattan Portage has some. It's enough to accommodate all you need, ie map and guide, possibly a small camera. And you have control on its access all the time, it's not in your back.
Art_Vandelay is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 11:14 AM
  #36  
 
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It's just a small sport sack that is attached to a belt around your waist. It's really for sports, such as skiing or cycling. I think they were sometimes referred to as fanny packs by some people in the US because of their use while running or skiing (the pouch is put in the small of your back, rather than in front). A lot of people wear them just walking around while touring, hiking, etc., to carry small stuff. Even in the US, I don't think you see these called fanny packs in the store. It's not the usual term for them nowadays. I think they are usually called waist packs. They are not day packs and are not on your back, so a messenger bag has nothing on them in that regard. Messenger bags are a lot bigger and bulkier.
Christina is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 11:18 AM
  #37  
 
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I agree-no fanny packs! That coupled with white sneakers will scream "American tourist!" Not that there's anything wrong with being a tourist, but calling unnecessary attention to oneself isn't always prudent. I personally carry a purse just like I would here in NYC, or a larger tote bag, or a smallish backpack...
Jenski is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 11:28 AM
  #38  
 
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My in-laws wore fanny packs in Russia and were pickpocketed, they didn't even realize what happened until later. Their passports/credit cards/$$$ were all taken.

kangamom is offline  
Feb 13th, 2006, 11:42 AM
  #39  
 
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Tamara- I guess it is POSSIBLE that a money belt worn under your clothing could become wet if you are caught in a downpour (but wouldn't you be wearing a jacket?)
suze is online now  
Feb 13th, 2006, 11:44 AM
  #40  
 
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Ah, une banane! In French, they are called a "banana". Woaw, last time I used it must be skiing as a teenager circa 1978...
Christina, you didn't read my post: I was mentioning measurements (OK, in metric, but you should know better... ). Actually, it's more a "DJ bag" than a "Messenger bag", check this URL:
http://www.manhattanportage.com/cata...products_id=95

I personally only swear by those when visiting
Art_Vandelay is offline  

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