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European Trivial Trivia!

Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:15 AM
  #21  
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5 - bingo for Cowboy! Yes that's what they told me when I visited Cabo de Roca - not far from Sintra and Cascais in Portugal near Lisbon.

6- Yes Paris but actually in a suburb of Paris.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:16 AM
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Replicas of Statue of Liberty in Paris, PalenQ. I know of three. There were twelve miniature casts made when she was built, so there must be nine more somewhere.

My question: Where are the three in Paris?
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:21 AM
  #23  
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nukesafe - good question - without looking it up of course I'd say one is on the same bridge a Princess Di Memorial was on for a while - by a plaque commenorating the Paris Herold-Tribune - the other two I do not know - American Embassy?

But I should have phrased my question in what city outside of Paris is there a replica of the Statue of Liberty - in the home town of the artists who executed the original statue in NY Harbor (though I believe actually in New Jersey!).
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:21 AM
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6... I don't think that the Ile aux Cygnes is already outside of 75.
Have seen another one at Arts et Metiers
No clue where #3 is.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:31 AM
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Number 3 : Luxembourg Garden
One of the 12 casts is in New York City on Madison Avenue
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:47 AM
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BTW, the one at Arts et Metiers is just by the entrance, but inside the museum you can find one of the most fascinating (at least to me) exhibits I have ever seen. It is a model in a glass case of the factory in which the Statue was made. It must have been made at the time the statue was being built. You can see, in incredible detail, tiny workmen and their tools beating the enormous copper sheets into the shapes that will be sent to New York to be assembled. Really a neat thing!
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:59 AM
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Arts-et-Metiers is one of my very favorite museums anywhere - in an old church and one of Focault's pendulums (maybe a replica?) swimngs in the chapel if I recall correctly. Lots of old scientific instruments like Lavoisier's chemistry stuff - anyone into old scientific stuff will love it. I love the old rail of a model railway that I guess used to run around the museum - rails still in the creaking wooden floors. Or maybe it was to move stuff around?
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:09 PM
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7- The small town gave its name to Meringue, the famous candy. It also has a Sherlock Holmes Museum in a tiny old chapel.

8- This Spanish city's name was corrupted by Brits who controlled its famous wine trade - the wine - xxxxx - is name after this city but changed its spelling when Brits used it - a favorite of old ladies all over Britain at one time.

9 - The Karl Marx House where he lived as a kid is in this ancient city, one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in Europe - with a famous Roman gate and Roman temple converted to a Christian Basilica about two centuries ago!
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:22 PM
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8 Aporto, Porto and Port
9 Trier
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:25 PM
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8 - xeres - sherry
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:30 PM
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I'm confused by the numbering system. What happened to 1 to 100?


>

Jerez
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:44 PM
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I was thinking of Jerez (de la Frontera) and sherry but I guess Aporto and Port would make sense too!
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 12:56 PM
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Oporto / Porto
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 01:06 PM
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Except Oporto is in Portugal, not Spain.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 01:14 PM
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rubicund - now why did I not realize that? So stoooooopid! Porto would make sense if it were in Spain.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 01:16 PM
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Trier?
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 01:49 PM
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7. Meiringen near Bern in Switzerland.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 02:06 PM
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Yes to both Trier and Meiringen (on Lake Brienz near Interlaken and Bern to as the crow flies.
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 10:51 PM
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I realised "Portugal" just after I clicked Submit, we so need an edit function

No ideas yet about, unless I've missed it

3) What is the "hood event" and why is it a problem?
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Old Nov 17th, 2014, 11:09 PM
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"with a famous Roman gate and Roman temple converted to a Christian Basilica about two centuries ago!"

Back on the Homebase Extra Gloss, are we? There's a Buy 2 get 1 free on Wickes Trade Matt 5 litre tubs right now. Well worth stocking up on to stave off those awful periods of sober lucidity.

I assume you're talking about the Aula Palatina. Built as a basilica (from the Greek for "king", and the common word throughout the Empire for a long, tall, thin building used to house a monarch's court) for Constantine 1 around 310 AD - 17 centuries ago. As far as I'm aware it was never used as a temple for traditional, pre-Christian, Roman rites.

It remained either abandoned or used as part of monarchs' or bishops' palaces for the following 16 centuries. It was converted into a church for Protestants (who've never used the term 'basilica' to describe any of their churches) in the mid-19th century.

In between its building and its handing over to the local Lutherans, people began to use "basilica" to describe first those long, tall buildings that came to be used by Christians as churches. By early modern times, Catholics - but never Protestants - later annexed the word as an honorific for certain exceptionally important churches.

Trier's Kirche zum Erlöser has never been a "Christian basilica"
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