e-mail jargon - translation needed

Apr 5th, 2001, 10:36 PM
  #41  
Al Smith
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No matter how thin you slice it, it's still baloney!
 
Jun 15th, 2003, 02:29 PM
  #42  
 
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Of the people who understand it, who LIKES this internet jargon, and who doesn't?

I hate the acronym jargon, like DH, IMHO, LOL, ROTFL, etc., but I think some of the little pictures made up of letters and marks are ingenious.
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Jun 15th, 2003, 02:39 PM
  #43  
 
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This thread died 2 years ago....
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Jun 15th, 2003, 03:58 PM
  #44  
cmt
 
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There is some slang that is peculiar to THIS internet forum, that I've not seen elsewhere, or I have seen elsewhere but used only by people I met on Fodors, or I've seen often on Fodors but rarely anywhere else. Examples:

faboo
resto
piccie

Do you think this forum has its own slang?
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Jun 15th, 2003, 04:48 PM
  #45  
dln
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Not sure if it does, but will someone tell me what DH stands for? It's the only one I haven't figured out, and my two teenagers were of no use. Darling Husband, maybe?
 
Jun 15th, 2003, 05:06 PM
  #46  
 
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Close: dear husband.

Hormel invented SPAM during the 30s (depression), but I gather it was eaten a lot during WWII also due to shortages. My dad used to eat it every once in a while (memories, I guess).
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Jun 15th, 2003, 05:07 PM
  #47  
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It's "darling husband." I used to think it was "divorced husband." Tee hee. So much for communicating!
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Jun 15th, 2003, 05:13 PM
  #48  
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Is "piccie" used by non-Fodors people, or does that qualify as a slang word that originated on Fodors? I'm also not sure whether I ever heard "resto" anywhere but there.

I never heard "faboo" used before I saw it here, but I did a search for it on Google. Here's what I found:


http://www.slangsite.com/slang/F.html

http://www.angelfire.com/ok2/stephj/sunnydaleslang.html

http://www.geocities.com/WestHollywood/Stonewall/4219/

http://www.panikon.com/phurba/alteng/f.html

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Mar 28th, 2005, 02:36 PM
  #49  
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topping for barbara33
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Mar 28th, 2005, 03:40 PM
  #50  
 
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Thanks Cmt!
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Mar 29th, 2005, 03:28 AM
  #51  
 
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'piccie' (or piccy) is well-established in British and I think Australian English from well before internet days. I would think of the 'internet American' term as 'pix'; likewise 'addy' I've only ever seen from US posters here.
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Mar 30th, 2005, 05:35 PM
  #52  
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How is "piccie" pronounced?
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Mar 30th, 2005, 05:36 PM
  #53  
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And what about "faboo"? I detest that word! Where have you heard/seen it used besides on Fodors?
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Mar 30th, 2005, 05:41 PM
  #54  
 
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Carol, I think I may be one of the few that uses the common Provençal Resto.
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Mar 30th, 2005, 05:49 PM
  #55  
 
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In the 60s, resto was French slang for restaurant; student restaurant = resto-U.
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Mar 30th, 2005, 05:55 PM
  #56  
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Is "piccie" pronounced like "pixie" or "picky" or "pitchy"?
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Mar 30th, 2005, 08:49 PM
  #58  
 
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cmt, I would guess that it's pronounced "picky". Despite Australians' habit of abbreviating words I can't recall hearing it, but I guess it's in use. Maybe in the state of Queensland, where the heat makes polysyllabic words just too exhausting to deal with - once in Brisbane a friend announced his intention of setting up the barbie (outside his new four-beddie overlooking South Straddie) and grilling a few muddies, washed down with a tinny or two. By the time I'd interpreted this to mean that he planned a barbecue outside his four-bedroom home overlooking South Stradbrooke Island, complete with mud crabs and cans of beer I was exhausted too.

I don't much like the acronyms, but many times I've found to my cost that tongue-in-cheek humour doesn't always communicate itself in this medium. I got sick of being flamed, LOL,
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Mar 31st, 2005, 09:39 AM
  #59  
cmt
 
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NeilOz: I always find it harder to understand someone's writing when there are acronyms. (I thought it was supposed to make things easier!) Maybe I'm just not enough of a follower/conformer to cheerfully adopt the various trendy lingos of every group that I belong to, Internet or otherwise.
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Apr 23rd, 2005, 03:41 AM
  #60  
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I just saw another one here yesterday: S/O. Someone said it means "significant other."
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