Driving in Germany

Apr 12th, 2007, 01:23 PM
  #1  
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Driving in Germany

Do I need an international driver's license to drive in Germany? Or is my I Canadian driver's license sufficient? I'm renting a car in Munich to drive out to the castles and this issue just occured to me...
Erin464 is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 01:24 PM
  #2  
 
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you do not need one in Germany. It doesn't hurt to have, but it isn't required in that country.
nycgirl1 is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 01:29 PM
  #3  
ira
 
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Hi E,

If you go into Austria, you will need and IDP and a road tax sticker.

ira is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 01:39 PM
  #4  
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Ira: I am going to drive to Neuschwanstein and then Linderhof. I believe that the trip in between those two castles will take me briefly through Austria (though I could be wrong on this - I'm going on what my friend told me)...does this mean that I need the International Drivers Permit for this very short portion of the trip? Also, what is this road tax sticker you mentioned? Is it necessary on a rental car, and if so, where can I get it?
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Apr 12th, 2007, 01:50 PM
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Erin,

No need to go through Austria, unless you take a wrong turn.

Ira -

Do you need a permit for driving on any road in Austria, or just the freeways?
Bird is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 01:52 PM
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I'm not Ira....but:

any road.

http://www.austria.org/motoring/
nycgirl1 is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 01:57 PM
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No, Autobahn only.
Alec is offline  
Apr 12th, 2007, 03:08 PM
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Yep - Autobahn only.

We went to that area last summer, staying just across the border in Austria from Fussen. We didn't drive on the toll road in Austria, so we didn't need the road tax sticker. There is a major highway just south of there that requires it though.
J_Correa is offline  
Apr 13th, 2007, 10:31 AM
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huh. AAA said it was any road - guess it doesn't matter since I have an IDP now, but that's good to know.
nycgirl1 is offline  
Apr 13th, 2007, 10:50 AM
  #10  
 
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No, not only on the Autobahn, but also certain highways. And you'll be fined anything between 15€ (the usual) and 5000€ for driving without the headlights on during daytime.
They like money...
logos999 is offline  
Apr 15th, 2007, 03:38 PM
  #11  
 
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Please check out this thread: http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34876475
IDL isn't required in Germany, but is in Austria. Here's the site for info on driving requirements in Austria: http://www.austria.info/xxl/_site/us...770/index.html
You will go through Austria to get from Schloss Neuschwanstein to Linderhof. Here are some maps here that will help: http://www.thirdmansystems.com/vacation/maps/maps.htm Click on "Munich to Fussen" and the "Garmisch Loop, Castles". I was once given the advice here to carry an IDL even if not needed, in case you get stopped you can turn that license over to the law enforcement officer instead of your regular license. The Austrian vignette sticker is about 8€ (for 10 days)and can be purchased at petrol stations. The fine for not having one is very high. 220€. I hope this is helpful.
norrisken is offline  
Apr 15th, 2007, 04:13 PM
  #12  
 
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Thanks for the heads up about the sticker in Austria - i was not aware of it. If not for this site how would I have learned about it? Is there anything special for Germany? I already have my IDL
bcirish is offline  
Apr 15th, 2007, 05:48 PM
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Thankfully no tolls in Germany for private cars. German drivers are correct but like to drive fast (and safely). Double-check your mirrors before pulling out on Autobahn - there may be a Porsche bearing down on you at 150mph, and pull in smartly after passing.
There are now many stretches of Autobahn with speed limit - clearly signposted in km/h. A sign with a black diagonal line indicates speed limit ends (freie Fahrt - no limit). But German highway law states if you have an accident driving at more than 130 km/h (around 80mph), you are bound to take the blame, even if another car travelling more slowly caused it, like cutting into your lane. The argument being, had you been driving more slowly, you'd probably have been able to take evasive action.
Alec is offline  
Apr 15th, 2007, 09:22 PM
  #14  
hsv
 
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>>But German highway law states if you have an accident driving at more than 130 km/h (around 80mph), you are bound to take the blame, even if another car travelling more slowly caused it, like cutting into your lane. The argument being, had you been driving more slowly, you'd probably have been able to take evasive action.

Only partly true. German law does not make any driver liable for damages incurred in accidents happening at speeds exceeding 130 km/h at all.

German jurisdiction has clarified, though, that speeds exceeding 130 km/h justify to assume that the driver has to bear part of the liability in an accident.
However, if such driver can prove that the accident would have happened at lower speeds, too, it is feasible to reduce any such potential liability.
hsv is offline  
Apr 16th, 2007, 03:17 AM
  #15  
 
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Driving in Europe 101.

In Europe, if one is passing another car, move back into the slower lane ASAP. You only drive in the faster
lane(s) to pass someone, not to live there.

If you are passing someone, leave your left turn signal on until you pass the car, and then immediately put on your right turn signal until you get back in the slower lane. It helps those who are faster than you know what you are doing.

The fastest I've gone is 240km on the Autobahn. Even at 170km I felt safer than driving 60mph in the U.S.

Europeans do drive faster, on the whole, but are far safer than Americans who tend to decide that they 'own' their own lane.
Rastaguytoday is offline  
Apr 16th, 2007, 04:19 AM
  #16  
 
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Though I haven't seen the latest statistics, in past years deaths and injuries per kilometers driven have been higher in Germany than in the USA. Partly due to the high speeds on the Autobahns, but also to accidents on secondary roads where people tend to drive too fast (I guess because they are used to the Autobahn speeds) and make dangerous passes.

Yes, you do need the IDP on any road in Austria (and Italy), and the vignette on the super highways. Not in Germany.
Jake1 is offline  

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