Do women drink pints in Irish pubs ?

Old Sep 5th, 2005, 11:53 AM
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Do women drink pints in Irish pubs ?

Yet another pub question: We're a week and a half from leaving for our trip to Ireland and I was wondering if women in Ireland drink pints of Guiness in the pubs? I remember in England that the women mostly ordered half-pints. How about pints of types of beer other than Guiness (e.g. not a stout)? Does it matter?
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 11:59 AM
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Women order exactly what they want (as they do in England). If someone orders a 1/2 pint it's because they don't want a full pint . . . . .
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 12:01 PM
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It's not unusual in a pub in England or Ireland to see Women drinking pints.

The only place people may look twice is in snooty / posh bars - here they might not even serve pints!
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 12:35 PM
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Excellent!

As you may have guessed, I am a beer drinker and I can't wait to taste the difference between the American Guiness and the Irish Guiness. I figured I'll "taste test" my way around Ireland. (And yes, we are staying at B&Bs that are in the middle of whatever town we are in.)

What are some of the other interesting local beers to try?
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 01:10 PM
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Well, funny you ask, because two of my good friends are Brits who moved here to Naples, Florida some 15 or so years ago and opened the "English Pub". I've never seen Viv there without a pint in her hand. So when we spend a week together in London, I was shocked to see her order a half. She explained it's how she was raised. In London, her mother would have killed her if she ever ordered a pint -- real ladies don't do such a thing! So it sticks with her today. In the US, it's a pint every time, but never in a London pub.
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 01:37 PM
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Try Smithwick's (pronounced 'Smiddick's) and Murphy's. But, it's hard to beat that dark, creamy Guinness, in my opinion.
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 02:53 PM
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For a nice change from beer - order a pint of Bulmers!
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 03:16 PM
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Definitely go for the Pint. We are now in the process of planning our 4th trip to Ireland and can't wait. And, there is definitely a difference between Guiness in the US and in Ireland, well worth the trip.
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 08:07 PM
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Well, If I order a lager or beer here in the US I order 24oz but then I was never shy to order a pint in the UK.

But then I'm hardly a shrinking violet and since I hung around with a bunch of 'Punks' in the late 70's I suppose old habits die hard!
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 08:18 PM
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Smithwick's is really smooth, and though of course we had our share of Guinness, by the end of our three week trip, we had grown most fond of "Smit-ick's" (the Irish don't pronounce the "h," hence the change in sound).

Someone in a pub suggested this excellent alternative -- and yes, in most cases, I (female) did order a pint.

Slainte!
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 11:31 PM
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Hmmm...I'd say the correct pronunciation of Smithwicks is neither Smiddicks nor Smiticks, but Smithicks. But maybe that's because I'm a Dub.

Kilkenny beer is also worth trying.
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 11:38 PM
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FannyMc

That's how we say it "Smith..icks"

works in the UK, Ireland and the US - especially Boston
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Old Sep 5th, 2005, 11:58 PM
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I can remember a barman refusing to serve me a pint when I was younger because 'we don't let women drink pints in here!' but I don't think it has been an issue for donkeys years. Drink what you like.
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 12:01 AM
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When I worked in a bar 20 years ago, the only women ordering pints would be students.

For non-students, the popular drinks would be 1/2 a lager and black, or a 1/2 lager and lime, and they would knock them back so quick, they'd be at the bar constantly, I used to think buy a pint for gods sake.

Thinking back, it seems the tastes have changed as the other popular drinks were things like Pernod & Black, Cinzano & Lemonade, vodka & orange(orange cordial).

Nowadays, even the Soaps such as Coronation Street are showing the women drinking pints although it hasn't caught on in Eastenders as the women always seem to drink wine or spirits.

As other people have said, if you want a pint order a pint, especially Guinness, as it takes forever to pour

Geordie
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 12:05 AM
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Patrick, times change. I think your friend has been away from the UK for too long. A pint for a lady in a London pub is no way the shocker it may have been to my mother's generation.

I wouldn't dream of ordering halves here in the UK or in Ireland - you have to make too many trips to the bar.
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 12:57 AM
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I have been known to have the few pints and still order them as a fall back from my poorer days. It was cheaper to get pinmts than halves .

By no means is it shocking anymore. even in the snooty bars of Dublin men and women order oints. Not a big deal.

Also Celtic is right try bulmers if you are not a big beer drinker! Its Irish cider and sweeter. Its called Magners outside of Ireland.
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 01:13 AM
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Yes its true, many women are ordering pints these days, it seems to be the under 30's generally as Mrs Muck (43 but looks under 30) ;-) would not dream of ordering a pint. Not least because her little hands would have difficulty holding the glass for any length of time. Although I am sure she is capable of drinking one.
Half pint is more the norm in many pubs although no one will care too much.

Enjoy

Muck
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 04:43 AM
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Mucky, it's not that common in pubs down my neck of the woods any more. Perhaps for the over 50s.
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 04:54 AM
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Nor anywhere I've lived - and I've been drinking pints for 35 years ! (Obviously I started as an infant )

One funny thing that did happen to me, though, in Sheffield about 22 years ago, was that the very elderly landlady in an old men's pub fearfully asked me if I'd like my pint in 2 half pint glasses
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Old Sep 6th, 2005, 06:31 AM
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"Authentic" Irish pubs in the US have taught their bar staff to pronounce it Smiddick's. This makes them sound "more Irish". That comes from the idea that many Irish pronounce "th" as "d" or "t". Only once did I pronounce it Smiddicks in Ireland and the bartender sternly corrected me. I'm guessing he may have thought I was poking at Irish pronunciation. Pronounce it Smithicks.

If you are in Co. Clare, try some beer from Biddy Early from the little village of Inagh. There is now a Kinsale microbrewery and in Dublin try the Porterhouse and McGuires. I didn't have a chance to try the D'arcy Stout from the brewery in Smithfield. They make a number of other beers too.

Bill
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