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Denied entry to UK; could this give me problems going to Estonia?

Denied entry to UK; could this give me problems going to Estonia?

Old Oct 1st, 2013, 10:59 AM
  #21  
 
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"And I fear the government office are already shutting down."

If nytraveler bothered to read other people's posts, s/he would have learned that is NOT the case.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 11:20 AM
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I thought that someone wrote the UK doesn't share the rejection information and stuff with Schengen countries? Hmm. Also, I had an idea. I realize as an American that I don't actually need a visa for trips that are below 90 days but is there some kind of visa I could still get in advance from the Estonian consulate anyway? As a kind of extra pre-caution in addition to getting a new passport and whatnot...because I really don't want to be turned away again after saving up the money for this.

And I just didnt have the return ticket printed out yet last time when in the UK, because I figured I would do that when I was actually leaving at the end of the month...I should have at least had the itinerary (I was actually out of ink at home) but I know I made a mistake, I've known that since it happened. I guess I just didn't expect to be pegged as a lying, would-be illegal immigrant intent on staying in the UK, since, well, I'm American. I don't plan on ever going back there anyway, since my bf no longer resides there. I just don't want that ordeal to impede travelling to Estonia because I didn't do anything wrong or intend to stay in the UK over my designated time frame. They just weren't convinced - maybe it's because they could tell I was a little nervous and thought I had something to "hide", I don't know, but it was my first time outside of my homeland, so of course I was nervous.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 11:29 AM
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" I guess I just didn't expect to be pegged as a lying, would-be illegal immigrant intent on staying in the UK, since, well, I'm American."

Ah, that American sense of entitlement....
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 11:54 AM
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Perhaps if you had offered to show them your return ticket reservation on a computer, it might have worked out better for you. I am not familiar with this kind of immigration questioning/detention, but something still does not resonate with me. Would they have let you do that?
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 12:15 PM
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The border guards of our respective countries can be a little heavy handed. I've had some stressful times at the hands of the US people (let alone the Canadians and do not mention the Israeli) so please don't measure the Brits by their border numpties.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 12:16 PM
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Well, you don't have call me entitled. I don't come from an area that is particularly "entitled" at all, my family is from a typical small, poor Appalachian town called Portsmouth in south Ohio, near West Virginia. I was actually originally reassured by my boyfriend, a Russian Estonian, that I didn't have to be nervous about anything because I'm American to start with, before I even left. I don't think that's such a crazy idea. I just meant I don't hear about many Americans going anywhere to be an illegal immigrant. I didn't mean it to sound bad or anything.

And eventually we were able to show them that I had a return but they still felt the stay was too long and only granted me 2 days temporary entry before I had to leave.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 12:36 PM
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>

>

Don't be a fool thursdays - that's not an American "sense of entitlement" issue, it's a reality - the would-be illegal immigrants to the UK don't come from the US.

That said, single, teen female meeting a "boyfriend" with no immediately produced return ticket screams "sex trafficking" to a border agent.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 01:05 PM
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"the would-be illegal immigrants to the UK don't come from the US."

The UK immigration officers obviously don't agree with you. So don't you be the fool.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 01:30 PM
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>

Yes, I'm sure that you can read their minds.

Daft.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 01:49 PM
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The OP didn't have their return ticket printed out, but who does nowadays in the world of e-ticketing? That alone would not be the reason to deny entry.

Only the OP and the border agency know what questions were asked and what answers she gave; for the rest of us, it's mere speculation. But something obviously gave concern for the OP's welfare. I'm more surprised she was granted entry for two days instead of being immediately sent back to the US.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 02:16 PM
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I am surprised you were denied entry once you were able to produce proof of a return ticket. I thought Americans were allowed to stay in the UK for up to 6 months, so I don't know why staying for a month aroused such curiosity that you were detained for 9 hours and then only allowed a temporary visa for 2 days.

Was this just an overzealous and capricious immigration officer? If so, does a traveler in this situation have recourse, i.e, someone they can appeal the decision to?

I haven't had a physical ticket in years, and I never print out my return e-ticket until right before I get ready to return to the US. I agree that simply not having a return e-ticket should not have set off red flags. Granted, I'm an old fart and less likely to raise suspicion than an 18 y.o. girl, but I have met tons of young people who travel for months around Europe, with limited funds, who don't arouse suspicion at any borders.

Guess I'm not as worldly as I thought because I'm puzzled as to why you were treated that way.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 02:54 PM
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Skyking: >>I thought Americans were allowed to stay in the UK for up to 6 months,entitled to enter/stay. They must first satisfy the immigration officer(s) that they are not entering for work, for nefarious purposes, don't plan on overstaying, can support themselves while in the country, etc. Everyone is asked something. If the answers aren't straightforward or the person seems nervous . . . they will ask a LOT more questions. Even the old farts.

So it is a good idea to have proof of the R-T or onward ticket . . . just in case.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 03:04 PM
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Above all they just insisted they didn't trust my boyfriend with my safety, even though we have proof he's met me three times in the US before, knows my whole family and is just a regular person. He was attending university in the UK and had just finished it when I came over, not doing something criminal, so I don't know what the problem was. Maybe I'm crazy but I wondered if they didn't trust poor little defenseless me with him because he's ethnically Russian...has anyone seen that movie "Eastern Promises"? Well I have a hunch these border people saw that movie, haha.

I just hope the ordeal didnt ruin my ability to go to other European countries without being treated like a suspect every time, even with a new passport, etc. I don't want to never be able to go over again without worrying about everything and I never want to waste a thousand dollars again.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 03:20 PM
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Gosh, when I think of all the times I just stepped up to the immigration officer blissfully unaware of the possibility of not being allowed in... I would have been a lot more nervous.

There was a show on BBCA a few years ago called "Airport" that showed LHR immigration combing through luggage, reading diary entries about "starting a new life," etc. and not allowing people in, but they usually didn't return after their 3 days' entry-time was up. Apparently immigration knows what they're about.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 03:25 PM
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"Maybe I'm crazy but I wondered if they didn't trust poor little defenseless me with him because he's ethnically Russian"

Yep, you may have hit the nail on the head - and others have brought up this possibility as well. I have not seen the movie you mentioned, but human trafficking is a real issue. And a naïve, small town girl of 18 visiting a boyfriend in a foreign country IS a red flag.

At any rate, you may be questioned upon arrival in the UK (and possibly other countries) in the future, so just be prepared for that possibility. Make sure you have your documentation in order - printed airline ticket receipt to show, the address of where you will be staying, ability to show you have funds and health insurance, etc. You might also bring evidence of a reason to go home - i.e. paperwork showing that you are enrolled in college for the next semester or something. Basically all the stuff that will show immigration officials that you know what you are doing, are really visiting like you say you are, etc. should they ask.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 03:42 PM
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janisj, I understand that no foreigner is entitled to enter the UK, but the OP said the immigration officer specifically told her to plan a shorter trip next time. I don't get that. Why should she have to plan a short trip when thousands of young people enter the UK every year and stay for weeks or months? I realize I don't know the whole story, but on the surface it just seems like she was bullied.

Do you know if a traveler has recourse if they feel an immigration officer has acted unfairly or arbitrarily? Mind you, I'm not picking on the UK because this could happen anywhere.

I'm probably overthinking this. Just wondering why they were so hard on her. Or maybe I already answered my own question, i.e., I don't know the whole story.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 03:58 PM
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>>Just wondering why they were so hard on her
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 04:07 PM
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I have some kind of hearing in a few months about it. They sent me a letter about my appeal on July 29th and told me then they would write me again on October 14th with further details on how the appeal would proceed and then give me the date and venue of the hearing. Hmm.

And I do feel like I was bullied at times, I'm a shy/quiet/nervous person by nature and this probably makes me an easy target if they feel grumpy. A man in the detainee room yelled at me when I was crying a little bit, keeping to myself, that he's "not here to comfort me, I'm nothing like that woman from before" (a female staff member before was being friendly to me) and then yelled at me when I was using the payphone trying to leave a voicemail to my mother. It's also funny how they accused me of not having medical insurance in the letter they sent me as a reason for rejecting me, when I do, and Aetna covers overseas.

I regret going there because like I said before, I feel this one incident has tarnished my travel record.
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 04:26 PM
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Did they ask you for evidence of your overseas medical insurance coverage when they were questioning you and were you able to provide that evidence?
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Old Oct 1st, 2013, 04:37 PM
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They didn't really ask me about my insurance, but I was asked if I was in sound health, which of course I am...I know I should have had the insurance card with me anyway to show, but my mother keeps it with her all the time and she didn't give it to me before I left. I figured that would be a non-issue though when I realized I didnt have it, because what's the most that could happen in one month. They were also questioning my funds and bank account, which is when I assured them I had $2000 on it, which is enough for me to survive a month. I think it all comes down to them not trusting my boyfriend really. I feel that it's pretty unfair what happened.
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