Chambermaid tipping

Old Dec 13th, 2013, 05:52 AM
  #101  
ira
 
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>Chambermaid tipping <

I have yet to succeed in tipping a chambermaid.


I probably never will.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 06:13 AM
  #102  
 
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My understanding is that within the USA tipping is culturally expected in part as hospitality employees such as servers are legally paid well below minimum wage, which is permitted for hospitality staff where tipping is the norm. However, in most other countries like Europe there is no allowance for employees to be paid below minimum wage because they receive tips and therefore the same financial considerations do not apply.
Furthermore, in some countries tipping is illegal because of a broader crackdown on bribery and in others an employee accepting a tip can get into trouble, as many governments try and crack down on the black cash economy, as it is difficult to tax cash tipping! In other countries the law requires a substantive service charge to be added to the check that legally has to go to the employees, so if you leave a further cash tip you could unwittingly be tipping over 40%.
It is difficult for those from the USA to understand that some other countries like Japan find the concept of tipping embarrassing and stressful, hence some governments attempts to legislate for service charges to be included and hospitality staff, unlike the USA, to be paid a proper living wage. Servers in some countries like France can be paid well.
In response to the OP, tipping chambermaids in Europe would be unusual and with many hotels any tips left in the room would have to be reported and handed in to avoid any misunderstandings that the cash tip was in fact stolen. I often leave loose change around my hotel room that could be construed as a tip and have never had it taken. Leaving a note is all very well, but how do you know the nationality of your chambermaid and what language they understand?
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 06:59 AM
  #103  
 
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<i><font color=#555555>"how do you know the nationality of your chambermaid and what language they understand?"</font></i>

You're kidding, right? A small piece of paper that says "thank you" left next to $5 on an unmade bed is not rocket science. If the note and $5 are still there when you return, then make a mental note of it and don't repeat the gesture.

It is amazing to me the brain hoops some people will jump through to justify no tip, no matter what the situation is. Like I said, these money threads reveal a lot.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 07:44 AM
  #104  
 
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Oh, great - now you are suggesting tipping US$ in Europe???

(The question/thread is about tipping in Europe, not in the states ...)
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 07:56 AM
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The answer is do your research before you travel and don't be so arrogant to expect that what is accepted as customary and expected practice in your home country, could not be culturally perceived as embarrassing or giving offence in another country. The American culture of generous tipping is seen as excessive and showing off in some countries, so does not necessarily give the good impression you might think!
Certainly tipping the front desk in many countries could be seen as inappropriate or even bribery if the intention was to curry favour to get a room upgrade and could backfire. Even tipping the concierge outside the US can be misconstrued as to your true intentions, as they don’t expect tips for arranging restaurant or theatre reservations, with lucrative commissions usually being paid by the establishments to the concierge for bookings made.
The fact is that in many countries tipping in addition to service charges where already added to the check, is not expected and can give offence so do your homework first.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 08:06 AM
  #106  
 
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NYCFS, some of us are more persistent when dealing with an untaken tip:

From my Warsaw experience:

"<i>The first morning we left a 5 zloty coin with a thank you note (in Polish) for housekeeping on the bedside table. It was still there that evening so on the second morning added another 5 zloty coin and moved the note to the bathroom basin area. That night we found it returned intact to the bedside table. We checked out on the third morning after leaving a third coin.
Perhaps it's still there.</i>"

I still think it was the right thing to do.

If someone tips absolutely no one in a given country, that's one thing, but it seems that some here are reluctant to tip the "invisible" housekeeper. So sure, round up for the waiter, bartender or taxi driver, but nothing for the person cleaning your bathroom.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 08:19 AM
  #107  
 
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"I still think it was the right thing to do."

Why do you think that?

Did you read this: http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...omment-8517562

What is your answer to the question?
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 08:20 AM
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It is astounding to me that of all the interesting topics on this forum, the posts that grow the most legs are those regarding tipping or exchanging money. But now, here I am adding to it...

I tip at home and I tip in Europe - not because it is expected of me, but because I like to. I feel it enriches me and my spirit more than it does the recipient.

In my younger days I worked many years in the service industry, and I appreciate how hard the work is. Maybe employees do receive a living wage for those jobs outside the U.S., and maybe they are not expecting a tip, but you can't convince me that anyone taking care of a family on a housekeeper's wages won't appreciate a few extra dollars at the end of the day.

Any time we have handed a tip directly to someone it has been received with grace and apparent gratitude. If I can extend a small gift as a token of my gratitude for the service, I am happy, and I think for just a brief moment, a bond is created...the world needs more of that.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 11:36 AM
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thursdaysd
You are correct about the minimum wage and the tipping wage in the US. Housekeeping staff wage in the US starts at 7.25 by law.Over time the wage may increase,but not much.

Almost all servers in the US get the tipping wage of 2.15 per hour.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 12:00 PM
  #110  
 
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Ira, love your comment!
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 07:54 AM
  #111  
 
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The existence of the surprisingly low tipping minimum wage of 2.15 in the USA needs to be better publicised to foreign visitors, as in the UK and France for example the minimum wage is the equivalent of US$10 and US$13 respectively and to pay someone less just because they get tips would be illegal. That way visitors will better understand why tipping in the US at percentages much higher than you would normally see in Europe, is expected.
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 10:17 AM
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I'll drag out an old story.

I once came across an American tourist family whilst on my yacht in Britain. They had hired a small motorboat which had broken down. I simply towed them back to their hire company, took about half an hour. Any seafarer in the world would have done the same. We had a laugh, at the end of which he tried tipping me 10 quid for my trouble.

I told him not to insult me and to leave his strange habits at home.
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 10:44 AM
  #113  
 
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Ira, I thought it might be akin to rock rolling, but I didn't want to say anything.

NYC, God called and said he didn't get no stinkin' bottles of wine from anyone yet.
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 10:49 AM
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I understand that in parts of Europe tipping is not expected.I was a manager in a hotel (in the US) filling in for one of the front desk agents.Front desk agents should not accept tips for good reason.

A man tried to give me a rather large tip upon his arrival. I told him that I could not accept tips of any amount. His reply was "oh you think you are to good for my money". That was awkward and embarrassing.

I can only assume that is how most people would feel when tipping is not the norm.

I only posted the tipping wage for servers in the US is only 2.15 per hr.
so that people from other countries might understand why it is important to tip these young men and women.
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 10:50 AM
  #115  
 
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I have a serious question regarding tipping in Italy which I understand is not the norm...at least for Italians in Italy.

Why have I read (or is this just incorrect information) that after paying for a coffee (and whatever) at a bar one places the ticket and some small change/coin on the bar with the ticket.

Is that a form of tipping the barista or is it called something else in Italy?
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 11:21 AM
  #116  
 
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Not sure where you might've read that, lowcountry. In Italy, you're supposed to take the receipt with you whenever you leave a bar or restaurant, and keep it for at least 100 yards from the store in case a finance authority stops you and asks to see it.
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 12:40 PM
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I cannot remember where over the years I read that but the barista needs to see that ticket so he knows what you have paid for as many bars get very crowded......several deep at certain times of day. I would assume then you are responsible for leaving the bar with receipt on the rare chance you are asked to produce it for authorities.

I would look this up in my Rome guide books but I left them over in Portugal with the intent on bringing them back in the spring when I expect a lighter suitcase. We did a five night stay in Rome this past October , flying from Lisbon and back to our place there. In Taszza d' Oro , placing the ticket on the bar seems to be done by what I have seen.....with a coin....possibly aka "a tip".
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Old Dec 14th, 2013, 03:34 PM
  #118  
 
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Cow Tipping turned out to be a myth (as anyone who grew up around cows could figure out)so maybe Chambermaid Tipping will be found to be mythical, too.
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Old Dec 15th, 2013, 03:43 AM
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>>I told him not to insult me and to leave his strange habits at home.<<

Thus, matching ignorance with ignorance.
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Old Dec 15th, 2013, 08:48 AM
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Scanned a lot of responses....leave a tip of you are satisfied with the cleaning. If not, that's another issue.
1-2 Euros a day and 1 Pound in the U.K.

I have travelled to Europe more than 30 times in the last 30 years. Until recently, tips were not "expected" but leave one and return to the restaurant and note the difference.

As a heads up, we just returned from our vacation and restaurants are adding an "optional" 11-12% tip on bills paid by credit card.
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