Chambermaid tipping

Old Dec 11th, 2013, 11:22 AM
  #81  
 
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(However much I dislike the stupid US system of expecting the customer to pay the staff's wages.)

thursdayd, then who the heck is paying the wages?
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 12:15 PM
  #82  
 
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jaja, obviously the customer is, no matter which way it is paid, but food in restaurants is not cheaper because we are expected to pay the waitstaff directly instead of through their employer.
Nor in many restaurants is the eating experience improved by the hovering waiter keen to get you back out on the street again asap so they can get another tip, I mean cover, seated.
Not to mention that most of them are not trained staff and it shows.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 12:31 PM
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My quote: "I think that it's fairly unethical, to accept extravagant gifts from your patients."

Response: "And I think it's wrong to put a comma where one does not belong. But if you're not a wine connoisseur, how do you know the bottle of wine you just unwrapped sells for $1200 until you Google it?"

Oh, yeah, that explains everything. Haha.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 12:59 PM
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<i><font color=#555555>"Oh, yeah, that explains everything. Haha."</font></i>

Before you laugh too hard, how about explaining what "fairly unethical" means. It seems to me, either you are ethical or you're not. I don't know how to define "fairly unethical," and I doubt you can define it, too.

And how do you define "extravagant" gift? When a cancer surgeon saves your life, and his fee to do the surgery (he doesn't accept insurance) could buy a house in the Midwest, what dollar amount spent on the gift is the cut-off to avoid your definition of "extravagant?" And who cares about your opinion?

Instead of laughing, try thinking next time you write.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 01:06 PM
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I was trying to be tactful in saying "fairly unethical" as opposed to "flat out unethical".

You must be kidding with your question of extravagance, as though a gift to a doctor is tied to his fees. That's dumb. Every company has its own definition of "extravagant". Where I worked, we couldn't accept a gift over $25 from clients and vendors.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 01:11 PM
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A surgeon who doesn't accept insurance? Now that's unethical to start with.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 01:29 PM
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Baggage handlers : tipping?

Wouldn't it be appropriate for those on US bound flights to cellotape $20 to each case, as a thank you to those lovely handlers who send your case to Bangkok, then jump up and down on it after it has been correctly redirected to Miami and leave it our in the rain, ready for you to collect it on the last day on your holiday.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 01:31 PM
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No, Dickie. That deserves some well chosen trinket.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 01:34 PM
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A gift to a doctor is usually tied to a patient's level of appreciation for the care received.

The AMA offers guidelines to doctors. Cash gifts are not permitted and nor are gifts of substantial value. One could argue, without knowing the history behind a $1200 bottle of wine, it's possible the bottle has no "substantial value." And one man's $1200 bottle of wine is another man's Kendall Jackson.

Defining "substantial value" can be a subjective thing. I see lots of room for interpretation there. Most doctors are human: they don't wish to insult their patients by refusing to accept a patient's gift.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 03:29 PM
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hetismij2, I opted out of my second economics class in college (applied psychology seemed a lot more interesting) but I suspect that if there were no tipping and waitstaff paid minimum wage then food would be more expensive. Perhaps not extravagantly so, but that money has to come from somewhere. My guess is not out of the owner/owners' pockets.
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 04:52 PM
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I am American. When I am in the US, I conform to US standards and practices on tipping. When I am in Europe, I try to conform to European standards on tipping, and so I generally don't tip in Europe. I will be taking my first trip to Japan soon and i plan to adhere to Japanese standards there.

I guess I just don't see what the fuss is about, here. I figure that if I am traveling, then I should try to conform to local norms.

--JC
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 06:35 PM
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@JC - precisely. Apparently your fellow-citizens have trouble with such simple concepts....
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 07:28 PM
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All those "when in Europe, act like a European" types ---
bet you still tip your taxi driver?
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Old Dec 11th, 2013, 07:57 PM
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What taxi driver? I take public transport.
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Old Dec 12th, 2013, 12:31 AM
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I assume that several people have no real understanding how prices and wages are fixed in Europe. Actually, there is no one common norm but you will find different regimes in the respective countries. You simply have to know where you are and how things are handled.

Typically, when you eat at a restaurant, for example in Germany and Austria, prices must be advertised including all taxes and the service charge. No hidden extras. Cover charges are illegal. If bread costs something, it has to be priced and you can decide to take it or not.
If a meals is priced at €24.50 on the menu it's €24.50 and not one cent more. Anything you leave on top is a true tip. And fully at your discretion. You can tip nothing or round up to €25 or even to €30.
Tipping nothing would not be uncommon, rounding up to €25 a common tip (i.e. 50c), "rounding up" to €26 or 27 a "good tip".

In other countries, restaurants may advertise their food and beverages without a (fixed) service charge. So if your meal was €20 and the place charges a 10pct service charge, your final check would be €22. If you pay €22 you don't tip a cent. Anything above would be the tip.

In Germany, it is common to round up restaurant checks and taxi fares. Nevertheless, if you don't tip, none of your companians will think anything about that.
If you go to the hairdresser, you usually do not just round up 50c, but give a bit more if satisfied.
Giving a euro or two to a city tour guide is quite common, too. But - for whatever reason - if you get, for example, a tour of a castle, you usually do not tip that type of guides.
In hotels, you can leave a euro or two per night for housekeeping - or not.

You usually don't tip front desk. I stay 20-30 nights per year in hotels in Germany, and the idea to tip the front desk to get a "good room" never crossed my mind. If I get a bad room, I rate the hotel respectively and don't go there again. But I also do not expect an upgrade or any freebies. If I want a suite, I book one.
Here, you do tip front desk/ concierges for "special services". Calling a cab is not "special", getting you tickets for an almost sold out concert is "special". Showing you the way to the next convenience store is not "special", finding you a grocery store with a wide range of gluten-free products would be "special". I think you get the point.
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Old Dec 12th, 2013, 01:56 AM
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Cowboy1968

While Germans do not tip the front desk, they often do it, when they stay in resort hotels in Southern Europe ( and i'm talking about Greece in particular)
They also leave small tips for the chambermaids...
Greeks would never tip them.

A tip in restaurants is always welcome, but not necessarily expected. Rounding up, as i know it from Germany is very common here.
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Old Dec 12th, 2013, 02:18 AM
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"Personally, I think it helps to not leave the room a big mess and to be courteous."

Exactly
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Old Dec 12th, 2013, 06:04 AM
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I've had taxi drivers in Rome refuse my tip. I usually don't offer a tip to a taxi driver, FOLLOWING ITALIAN CUSTOM, but once my granddaughter fell and got a bad brush burn. A taxi took us back to our apartment and stopped and waited at a pharmacy on the way so I could get some antiseptic and gauze. I thought that truly deserved a tip, as the fare doesn't advance very much for waiting time. However, he refused the tip.

Another driver saved us some time when we had a tight train schedule, by dropping us off at a door near our departure track, even though that meant he lost time getting into the taxi queue at another entrance. I also thought this deserved a tip, but again, it was returned to me with a smile.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 12:24 AM
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We always tip everyday for service in our hotel room. We want that day's room attendent to know we appreciated her work. It has always paid off for us as we have gotten wonderful service and the attendents frequently come to us and thank us. We also tipped tour guides as well as the drivers and noticed many others did not tip the driver We thought it was very worthwhile.
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Old Dec 13th, 2013, 02:39 AM
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I think this thread might usefully be merged with one on how one can visit Europe and blend in with the natives.
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