"Celtic": "Keltic" or "Seltic" or Both?

Feb 27th, 2008, 10:45 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 648
The root is keltoi, the ancient greek word for foreigners. According to Caesar the people of Gaul called themselves Celts.
LAwoman is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 10:53 AM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 27,526
It seems we've had this discussion before.

http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34586656
jahoulih is online now  
Feb 27th, 2008, 11:02 AM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,315
I should have said that celtic entered the English language via French and that the correct pronunciation is seltic.
kerouac is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 11:09 AM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 10,334
In any case, the Scots, Welsh and Irish are about as Celtic as my uncle Mustapha bin Abdul.
J_R_Hartley is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 12:17 PM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
J R Hartley wrote: "In any case, the Scots, Welsh and Irish are about as Celtic as my uncle Mustapha bin Abdul."

Wow! My precursors (note that I don't say ancestors) ranged even further that I had supposed. Does he speak a Brythonic or a Goidelic language?
Padraig is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 01:04 PM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 10,334
As a Turk, his precursors would have spoken Galatian, a now extinct Continental Celtic language, and so would be closer to Celtiberian and Gaulish than to the insular Celtic Languages you cite.
J_R_Hartley is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 02:06 PM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,862
When I was a young English teacher and announced that it could be pronounced either way, an older English teacher, very categorically, told me "it's Keltic." I'm glad to know there's some room for disagreement on this.

Where is that %&*# now!!!
Cimbrone is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 02:14 PM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
Hi Pal,

have you nothing better to do on your travels than find daft threads for us to answer?

but then you are in Tonbridge for goodness sake, so I've just answered my own question. [just think dundee on a wet sunday afternoon with even less to do].

the cornish think of themselves as Celts [or Kelts if you prefer] like the welsh, Bretons, etc. recent DNA testing revealed that they have most in common with the Basques of northern spain. how did that happen?

regards, ann
annhig is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 02:34 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,862
annhig, apparently northern Spain was settled by Celts who spoke a form of Celtic called Celtiberian. Apparently, the Celtiberian people formed when Celts migrated from France to Spain and bred with the local populace.
Cimbrone is offline  
Feb 28th, 2008, 01:09 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,118
In Ireland we say Keltic unless when referring to the football team who are Glasgow Seltic.
cailin is offline  
Feb 28th, 2008, 02:53 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 760
Either pronunciation is correct. Which pronunciation is preferred depends on where you are (e.g., England, the USA, or Ireland) and the context, but neither is incorrect, EXCEPT if a team or some other entity chooses one pronunciation or the other for its name; e.g., the Boston (S)eltics basketball team. In this case, (S)eltics would be the correct pronunciation.
Jake1 is offline  
Feb 28th, 2008, 05:36 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,313
I've only ever heard Keltic when listening to Irish/Scottish/Welsh music. Seltic for the sports teams. When I first came across the difference, it was when speaking to a Welshman living in America, he was quite insistent that it was Keltic. That's the first time I'd heard the hard C sound for it.

Of course, I have also heard Seltic in a song by Steve McDonald, a new age Scottish musician.

And I've seen Keltoi from the Greeks.

I think there is no hard and fast rule, but certainly popular preferences. I call it Keltic unless I'm talking sports (which I rarely do)
GreenDragon is offline  
Feb 28th, 2008, 06:25 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 10,334
"Apparently, the Celtiberian people formed when Celts migrated from France to Spain and bred with the local populace"

Genetics has thrown the migration theory out of the window.

It was language and culture that spread, not people.

Annhig. It that the British and Irish came to the islands about 15000 years ago from Spain, and no subsequent migration, be it Roman, Viking, Saxon, Norman, or anything else has impacted any more than 5% of the gene pool.

The English aren't Anglo-Saxons, and the rest (for which I couldn't give tuppence) are not Celts.
J_R_Hartley is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:15 AM.