Can I help you ?

Sep 30th, 2009, 08:15 AM
  #41  
 
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We call'em "chien-loup" when we don't exactly know what kind of dog they are, especially when big and scary.>

and that's why my son, Sylvain, would then as a child call any German Shepherd-like dog 'chien loup' - because at age 8 or so they all seem scary!

I'll have to ask him now, aged 26 and living here with me whilst studying Aeronautical Engineering at the local U what he would call what we call a German Shepherd. Again thanks for your accessibility for these rather silly Qs and more importantly to help Fodorites plan Alsatian journeys

BTW your English is, like Coco's impeccable - did you spend time in an English-speaking country - seems like you must have to have such a command of not only proper English but also colloquialism like call'em though technically this would be call 'em!

Cheers
Palenque is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 08:39 AM
  #42  
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I try to do my best. I'm a travellin'man so it's important to speak a foreign language. I only spent 3 years learning English at school (like other French students) and that's not enough so I completed this lacking by myself.
I also have to say that I've been several times in the US on vacations and that's the best way to learn English.
Next trip for "travellin'man" is Shanghai, Hong-Kong and Macau. I have now 30 days to learn Chinese !!!
Like "Ike" said : "OK We go !!!"
bertrand is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 08:44 AM
  #43  
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Even if you find my English "impeccable", feel free to correct me. I'm open-minded.
bertrand is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 08:56 AM
  #44  
 
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bonjour, Bertrand! My ancestors are from Alsace, but I think they were really German occupiers. Have you heard of the surname Quell around there?

Another language question -- I thought all French students studied English for about 6 years in school. Is 3 years of English in school more typical? What is the foreign language requirement for French public students. I assume it may be different for those students who want to go to university and those who do not, is that correct?

When I was in high school in the US, we did not have to take any foreign language to meet the government standards, but I think those who wanted to be accepted at a university had to take at least three years, but they could choose their own language (in my school, it was Spanish or French or German or Latin, that is all). Are French students required to take English or can they choose a language to study? I know many will want to take English for business or job reasons, I just wonder what the requirements are.

Your English is excellent for someone who had only 3 years. Once I had a friend I met online who was a student at Bordeaux and I helped him with his English homework, it was fun for me as I could explain things in French.
Christina is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 09:32 AM
  #45  
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Nobody's fault but mine !!!
It's not 3 years but 5 years. I'm sorry.
At the age of 11, we have to choose our first foreign language. Living near the German border I chose....German (much easier for me). Two years later I started to learn English and so it went, 'til the end of my studies.
I've never been to University. School drove me nuts !
Never heard about the name of Quell, sorry about that.
bertrand is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 10:03 AM
  #46  
 
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My son says that in Orleans (i think it could vary a bit by region even though it is a centralized education system i believe) that kids going for their BAC take a foreign language - mainly English for at least six years - he took it for 8 even though he often spoke better than the teachers, accent-wise.

But even his friends who did not go to Lycee but became apprentices did take some English before dropping out as well - but their English skills are IMO non-existent.
Palenque is offline  
Sep 30th, 2009, 01:29 PM
  #47  
 
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Thank you for the infos.
Christina is offline  
Oct 1st, 2009, 02:48 PM
  #48  
 
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Here's a question you might be able to help with: we will be staying in Riquewihr and although I'd like to buy a couple of pieces of Soufflenheim or Betschdorf faience, we probably won't drive that far north to those towns. Do you have any idea where we might buy the pottery that wouldn't be as expensive as, for example, buying it in a shop next to the cathedrale in Strasbourg, where I imagine it is highly priced. I would guess the same would be true about "tourist" shops in Riquewihr, also.

This is not a high priority question, but I thought I would ask in case you might have an opinion. Merci!
grandmere is offline  
Oct 1st, 2009, 04:08 PM
  #49  
 
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Bertrand - are you familiar with Sarreguemines? I have several pieces of very old porcelain made by Utzschneider & Co, which factory I know no longer exists. I've wondered whether I'd be able to find more information about this porcelain or the factory if I visited Sarreguemines. Are there any museums or such there that might have information? Or might you know where I could inquire? Or maybe I should just visit the town -- is it worth a visit? Would appreciate any info. Thank you!
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Oct 1st, 2009, 06:18 PM
  #50  
 
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Great thread Bertrand! Hopefully I will have an intelligent question to ask sometime soon, but in the meantime I will just read and learn.
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Oct 2nd, 2009, 08:37 AM
  #51  
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Hi Grandmere, I'm sorry but I'm not familiar with pottery.
According to me, cheap faience coud be fake and imported.
There are only 2 hours drive from Riquewihr to Soufflenheim and the village worth the visit.
When in Alsace, ask locals where they buy such stuff.
I'm so sorry I can't help you.
You should try to go to the supermarkets like CORA, there is a big one in Colmar and I'm pretty sure you will find what you're looking for here.
Hope I will be more help another time.
Bye
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Oct 2nd, 2009, 10:35 AM
  #52  
 
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Thank you, Bertrand; perhaps we will go to Souffleheim since you say the village is worth the visit. I don't want cheap faience-- just didn't want to buy it at the most expensive place and assumed that would be near major tourist sites.

Thank you, also, for the tip about where a nearby supermarket is located; we are staying in a rented house so will need supplies.
grandmere is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2009, 02:23 AM
  #53  
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Hello, when driving northbound to Selestat, the supermarket CORA is located a short distance after the round-about, the one in which you can see a replica of the statue of liberty. As you surely knew, Colmar is the city where Bartholdi was born, his mother was the model he use for the statue.
If you plan to drive to Soufflenheim and Betschdorf :
There is a pottery museum in Betschdorf (open from Easter to Halloween only).
Don't hesitate to drive 15 miles further north to visit the beautiful villages of Hunspach and Seebach. You will see streets lined with half-timbered houses but, here, no colors, only black and white. I've found that wonderful.
Bye
bertrand is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2009, 03:15 AM
  #54  
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message to travlsolo2 :
Sorry but I know nothing about Sarreguemines. I drove once in this area and I remember a sad city, grey and boring.
A friend of mine who I had on the phone yesterday and had lived 20 years in this town told me that's if you have one thing to do when arriving in Sarreguemines is to turn and walk away ! Even the crows fly on their backside when above !
I'm sorry for the people who like the city but she doesn't !!! And she was born there.

I've found some web-sites which might help you :
sarregueminesvaisselle.com
sarreguemines-passion.fr
sarreguemines-museum.com

Bye
bertrand is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2009, 03:35 AM
  #55  
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Another tip :
I mentioned the city of Selestat, between Strasbourg and Colmar. Very lovely historic downtown with a museum I'm sure you will appreciate, you Americans who are mad about our bread :
La maison du pain ( museum in which one can assist in making bread , free tasting ). Pretty nice, worth the visit.
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Oct 3rd, 2009, 07:14 AM
  #56  
 
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Thank you so much for all the helpful advice! It's good to know about these places that we might otherwise miss.
grandmere is offline  
Oct 5th, 2009, 06:22 AM
  #57  
 
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ttt
Palenque is offline  
Oct 5th, 2009, 07:16 AM
  #58  
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What does "ttt" mean ?
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Oct 5th, 2009, 07:48 AM
  #59  
 
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It means "to the top", used to get this thread to the top again so it is kept current.
grandmere is offline  
Oct 5th, 2009, 07:55 AM
  #60  
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OK, thank you.
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