British supermarket goodies?

Old Sep 6th, 2013, 01:25 PM
  #121  
 
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Proper HP sauce
Proper Mars bars
Flakes
Smarties
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 02:10 PM
  #122  
 
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"Proper HP sauce"
We haven't had that since they moved production from England to Holland.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 02:40 PM
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"..I've never heard of it used in plum pudding - unless you mean by that a christmas pudding type which uses suet instead of butter/marg. "

Yes, that's what I meant by a plum pudding, boiled (wrapped well and tight, and fully immersed in water) and served at Christmas. Not sure why we call it that but it's stuck in our family. A cousin makes one every year (varying results !) and she uses the darker dried fruit (currants, raisins, plums, prunes) and some candied peel and nuts.

I know of the steamed meat puddings you mention but haven't made those. However the meat pies I speak of are similar, made in a shallow baking 'tin' (as opposed to a basin) which is lined on the inside with the suet pastry, filled with a partially cooked meat filling, topped with a crust of the same suet pastry and then baked. I know someone who does one in a bain marie, which would be even closer to the meat pudding you mention.

Forgot to mention, I've used suet in small dumplings as well, as in a chicken stew.

"Proper HP Sauce"... with proper, fried, english sausages... or chipolatas. The best !
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 10:40 PM
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Another meaty variation of a suet pudding is to roll out the pastry quite thin, then lay out any scraps of leftover meat from a cooked joint, or of bacon (if you should manage to find any not pumped full of brine), and roll it up and steam it. I've also done the same thing with cheese and onion.

Or of course, you could make a sweet version, and call it jam roly-poly (ah, memories of school dinners)
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 02:15 AM
  #125  
 
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You can't have a proper beef stew without suet dumplings. Sacrilege.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 02:51 AM
  #126  
 
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Yes, that's what I meant by a plum pudding, boiled (wrapped well and tight, and fully immersed in water) and served at Christmas. Not sure why we call it that but it's stuck in our family.>>

I think that originally plums were used in a plum pudding [I found an old recipe in Eliza Acton i think] but dried fruit took over. our Christmas pud contains all the dark dried fruit you mention, and is then steamed for a long time. [or cooked for rather less time in a pressure cooker].
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 05:19 AM
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I believe that raisins/currants used to be called plums and they still feature heavily in Christmas pudding (which is delicious, unlike Christmas cake!)
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 05:24 AM
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Jam Roly poly!!! I haven't thought of thas
t for years Was a favorite as a child!!!
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 05:34 AM
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>>I think that originally plums were used in a plum pudding [I found an old recipe in Eliza Acton i think] but dried fruit took over<<

There could be a good reason for making sure your Christmas pudding has dried plums, i.e., prunes in. Many prunes. Many, <i>many</i> prunes.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 10:22 AM
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done that, Patrick. I also made my Christmas puds with fresh plums one year, but you have to do it in September and put them in the freezer, else they tend to go off.

Tarquin - the recipes for Christmas pud and Christmas cake aren't that different, really. I usen't to like either of them but now i can take them in small quantities.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 01:27 PM
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I don't think there has been any mention of cheese!
(This is what I always miss when visiting the US...)
Either from a supermarket ( Waitrose, Marks & Spencer - they have smaller portions so you can get a selection without needing a second suitcase!) Or from www.paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk/‎
And for those who like Marmite, you can make a cheese and Marmite sarnie!
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 01:42 PM
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>>And for those who like Marmite<<

Wandering off-topic slightly, there's been a certain furore (but all publicity's good publicity, eh?) about the latest ad campaign for Marmite:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHjssdNNzP0
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 02:16 PM
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If in going in the fall, I'd pick up a jar of mincemeat. Love Tiptree mincemeat but paying $11.00/jar is highway robbery.

And I know this sounds weird, but one time before the liquids ban, I picked up a small container of Fairy dishwashing liquid simply because the brand name would never work in the US. Worked pretty well too.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 02:40 PM
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"I picked up a small container of Fairy dishwashing liquid simply because the brand name would never work in the US. Worked pretty well too."

Why wouldn't the brand name work in the U.S?
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 03:49 PM
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Cakes by Mr. Kipling. The french fancies are my fave.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 05:18 PM
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Hooameye, not politically correct.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 08:31 PM
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Patrick, the funniest thing about that commercial is the obviously unintended double entendre in the last 6 words of this disgruntled viewer's comment :

"...If they make a new marmite advert tomorrow and it have a marmite jar in a wheel chair and it is acting like a disabled person. Would you still laugh? And think it is 'still a parody?'

There is parody and there is bad taste and this advert is bad taste. " lol.
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Old Sep 7th, 2013, 10:18 PM
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But for many of us, Marmite is never bad taste. Or only in the wrong context.

Is there any other product where they make a virtue of some people loathing it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pm1qP_y9V9k
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Old Sep 8th, 2013, 06:42 AM
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I'm a marmite fan myself. Six years of having it in an elevenses sandwich while at an impressionable age will do that to you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYT0UvKz7nk
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Old Sep 8th, 2013, 07:18 AM
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On thick hot buttered toast is the only way to eat marmite.
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