British supermarket goodies?

Old Sep 1st, 2013, 11:24 AM
  #101  
 
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Callard and Bowser "Butterscotch"
Sarsaparilla
SPAM
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Old Sep 1st, 2013, 12:58 PM
  #102  
 
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HP Sauce.......
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Old Sep 1st, 2013, 01:44 PM
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<i>They even used to sell bags of broken chocolate biscuits for about 10p!</i>

The nearest to that these days are Thornton Misshapes which are either £1.99 per packet or £1.99 for two packets depending on how they feel about pricing
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Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 08:29 AM
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.... and Daddies Sauce.
Piccalilli
Eccles Cakes
Chorley Cakes
Bakewell Tart
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Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:00 AM
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Malteasers.
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 09:05 AM
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Seville orange marmalade
Christmas puddings
good teabags, from Betty's or Fortnum and Mason's
anything made of rhubarb
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 09:46 AM
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elderflower cordial

clotted cream

real jams and marmalades

crisps

just about any chocolate covered biscuit

good shortbread

as menioned - ANYTHING made of rhubarb

piccalilli (my DH's personal favorite)
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 10:25 AM
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semiramis - I was going to mention clotted cream [cornish, obviously] but thought it might go off in the luggage.

if you're having clotted cream you MUST have scones [or even better, splits] and golden syrup to make thunder and lightening.
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 10:47 AM
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Luckily, here in Ontario we can get imported British clotted cream from some Loblaws Superstores, Metro and Sobeys (all grocery chains).
Our local British import store also carries Tate & Lyles Golden Syrup (a refined version of our regular corn syrup) in the signatuire green tin, and treacle (a variation of molasses) in the red tin, which as a child, I used to love watching the prise-off lid blow off and stick to the kitchen ceiling.
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 01:08 PM
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and treacle (a variation of molasses) in the red tin, which as a child, I used to love watching the prise-off lid blow off and stick to the kitchen ceiling.>>

that Health and safety - such a killjoy.
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 07:11 PM
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lol, it always did that. Something to do with the fermentation in the can.
Golden syrup and treacle were the secret ingredients of my mother's Christmas cakes, and on 'stirring' day, we all had to stand back when she opened the red tin, hehe.
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Old Sep 5th, 2013, 10:33 PM
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Lucky she could get it off. In my thrifty parents' household, it might mean re-opening the previous year's tin, which could involve a chisel and much swearing.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 04:19 AM
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Ha ha Patrick, so true. In our house it was a flat head screwdriver, carefully inched around the lid.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 04:42 AM
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So funny Mathieu! I'll have to look for those red tins.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 05:00 AM
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For years I made treacle toffee for Guy Fawkes. I made sure the children were out of the house. Boiling sugar, treacle and children don't mix.
An American friend of mine likes suet puddings and took a packet of suet home with her. She said that she usually has to get it from a butcher and grate it herself
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 08:33 AM
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I love treacle toffee, and nowadays, with a sprinkling of a few sea salt crystals on top. Treacle fudge is good too.

I find it hard to get proper suet here in southern Ontario. A local german butchery who knows what it is and how best to prepare and sell it is my only nearby source, but sadly I don't know for how much longer. It's not a common ingredient here.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 09:24 AM
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Mathieu - you can always make your own by grating the fat around a kidney.

it's easily available in the UK in a packet and in a vegetarian version.

what do you use it for, BTW?
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 09:33 AM
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I love the vacuum packed herbed Olives from Waitrose. I always bring home about 12 bags, I've given them to friends too and aleays get requests for more!!!
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 12:56 PM
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Not a fan of kidneys Ann so I rarely buy them though I know that's where suet mainly comes from. The german butcher I get it from usually consolidates it into a lump for me. I then clean it, mix it with breadcrumbs and flour and then grate it. More work than I'd like but usually just once a year and I make it last.

I use it in the pastry for a meat pie. Tastes great if you're familiar with other types of pie pastry to know the difference. I've once put it in a steamed fruit pudding (I know it's used in plum pudding) but couldn't tell any difference in the taste there; that's probably because I don't make or eat steamed puddings that often to notice a difference though I suspect its purpose there is to lend to the sticky texture.
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Old Sep 6th, 2013, 01:07 PM
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I use it in the pastry for a meat pie. Tastes great if you're familiar with other types of pie pastry to know the difference>>

Mathieu - i asked because in the UK it's traditionally used for what are called meat "puddings" normally steak and kidney [so called because a pudding basin in lined with suet crust, filled with the stewed meat, topped with a pastry lid, and then steamed til cooked].

it's also used for sweet puddings like spotted dick. I've never heard of it used in plum pudding - unless you mean by that a christmas pudding type which uses suet instead of butter/marg.

We use it as a pastry topping for a stew but that isn't normal here - we got it from an idea by Delia Smith. luckily we can buy it in a packet from the supermarket.
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