Notices

Brighton in November?

Reply

Oct 26th, 2013, 08:38 AM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 10
Brighton in November?

A couple of hardy souls have suggested that Brighton is a wonderful day trip from London, even in November (when we will be there). Given that these advisors were college students, I'm wondering if parents would have the same opinion. Thoughts? Thanks.
cdbarlow is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 08:42 AM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 66,687
Brighton in November? I stayed in Brighton in December and would have called it "Darkton" - gray overcase and very short days with very litle for the average tourist to do. Young folks yes at night Brighton hops as younger folks flock here to its clubs and pubs and concert halls.

Cities that are nice in any weather IME - Cambridge; Oxford, Bath, York, Salisbury & Stonehenge, etc.
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 08:52 AM
  #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,664
I find myself in complete agreement with PalenQ on this one. I'd rather stick needles in my eyes than visit Brighton in November. You can be sure it will look even more dirty and run-down against a backdrop of grey skies and showers.
Gordon_R is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 10:58 AM
  #4
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,053
Why would Brighton be dark, or wet in November?

It's not a rain-sodden, Arctic hellhole like Boston or New York. It gets the same amount of year round as bloody Detroit, whence PalQ issues his criticisms of places with civilised weather - but without the guaranteed frostbite. And never in history has it approached the sheer horror of the awful November weather most Americans grin (well, let's be honest: whinge) and fail to put up with.

With slightly less tourists than usual (there are a few feckless Britons who go into American-style conniptions at the prospect of a few clouds. But, mercifully, most of us aren't such wimps) you can get round the place, which you should really see as a miniature London with a beach.

Its museum is the world's raunchiest (where else is there a gallery devoted to the Dirty Weekend?): its Pavillion Europe's jolliest Royal Palace.

Strike a blow against knee-jerk American bigotry. Get on the train to Brighton and enjoy yourself.

We all do - except for stick in the muds
flanneruk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 11:01 AM
  #5
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,221
I don't really like Brighton at the best if times. The stag and hen do's drive me nuts and the pubs are average. Yes there are some good sights but there are much better places to visit in November .

Salisbury, Oxford, Canterbury are a few
jamikins is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 12:01 PM
  #6
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,649
Agree that Brighton is far down the list of places to visit in England - even in May or June. Yes I've been = ut I've been to the UK more than 20 times.

There are tons of places I would go first (for adults looking for sights - not groups of teens or early 20s looking to get drunk on the cheap).
nytraveler is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 01:23 PM
  #7
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 50,346
well it might not be my favourite place to visit on a cold and rainy November day, but if the forecast is good, it's worth going to for the Pavilion alone.

the Pier and the Lanes are fun too. Shame there's no sand on the beach, but there is a nice little train along the coast and a fun fair.

and you will get a true taste of English life - try reading Graham Greene's Brighton Rock!
annhig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 02:15 PM
  #8
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 66,687
Strike a blow against knee-jerk American bigotry. Get on the train to Brighton and enjoy yourself.>

Yes I enjoyed Brighton in December - was there New Year's Eve - some major celebrations there - even though some kind of hurricane blew in that seemingly could make the major pier collapse as a storm did to the old pier, which when I got there under sadly sagging in the water.

The piers are neat - an exemplar of a faded English seaside resort - the are some concerts at night, etc for all ages in town.

The shopping district around the Lanes was frenzied - I always like that.

I used it as a base to day trip into London (had a railpass) but spent one day here and enjoyed it very much.

That said if someone asks vfor an enjoyable day trip Brighton would be far down on this begoted Ynak's list - don't mean it can't be very enjoyable.
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 02:58 PM
  #9
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 10,169
I am an American, love Brighton, and frequently recommend it on this forum, often to the scorn of English posters, who do not seem to get that it's charms lie precisely how unlike it is to anywhere in the US.
Ackislander is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 03:08 PM
  #10
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 50,346
well said, Ackislander.
annhig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 03:38 PM
  #11
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 59,873
PQ talks out of both sides of his mouth. Horrid - wonderful. Take your pick. I would 100% go for the pavilion alone. . . But only if the day's forecast is decent. It is an easy day trip - but don't go if the weather is bleak.
janisj is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 04:06 PM
  #12
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 7,083
flanner, you're looking at the wrong statistic when comparing Brighton rainfall to that in NYC or Boston. What you need to compare is hours spent raining or having just rained or just about to rain again. Many more of those in Brighton. Whereas rainstorms in New York or Boston are briskly over in an hour or so and the sun comes out again.
Mimar is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 04:10 PM
  #13
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,727
Did I miss something or miss-read the question? I did not see where the OP asked for any comparison of Brighton with NY or Boston. I also did not see anything indicating that they were concerned about the opinion of people from any particular country. Where did all the rant about Americans, NY, etc. come from?
The only question I saw (was something removed from the post?) was a question as to whether "parent age" people would feel the same as "college age students."
Sassafrass is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 26th, 2013, 04:15 PM
  #14
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 59,873
OK then sassafras - what is your answer to the question???

I think there is plenty of info in the other posts.
janisj is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 27th, 2013, 10:49 AM
  #15
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 66,687
PQ talks out of both sides of his mouth. Horrid - wonderful. Take your pick>

Well horrid IMO in November and very nice in summer - janis I was mainly talking about the weather whether or not you realized that - don't think you did but weather makes a big difference in Brighton or any seaside resort - in summer it is hopping in winter quite the opposite. as you agreed with in your statement: " But only if the day's forecast is decent. It is an easy day trip - but don't go if the weather is bleak."

Thus we are as usual on the same page here. Well not really though the Pavilion is nice in no way is it a reason to travel an hour by train from London - no you come for the fmaous Brighton, the seaside town and that shines best in warm weather.



Besides the yes wonderful pavilion there is not much to see in the town itself but the pier is always interesting, if tacky to some I guess.
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 28th, 2013, 09:53 AM
  #16
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 8,080
"Where did all the rant about Americans, NY, etc. come from?"

At every possible opportunity and even when there isn't one. It's a phenomenon. I'd like to hear the rest of the story. Or maybe not.
MmePerdu is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 28th, 2013, 11:48 AM
  #17
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 66,687
It's like Old Faithful spouting up - sure to happen no matter what the context.

Does it represent some common antipathy English folk have towards Americans or it is an anomaly?
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Oct 28th, 2013, 03:19 PM
  #18
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 8,080
PalenQ, in my experience many English love expressing feelings of disdain for much that is American. But I've noticed, too, the same ones will make points with their English friends by having American friends. I guess what one might call a classic love/hate relationship. It would be disconcerting if it were not so amusing.
MmePerdu is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:10 AM.