Best Guide Book for Rome?

Old Sep 9th, 2003, 12:49 PM
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BLN
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Best Guide Book for Rome?

Any comments on what Rome guide books you loved?

I'm looking for one that serves us well while we're walking around - heavy on the cultural, historical details, light on the restaurants/hotels/bars. I was thinking either the "Rome in Detail" published by the International Herald Tribune or the Blue Guide. (Both were also published this spring - April/May 2003, which counts for something to, I guess.)

Suggestions and feedback would be much appreciated!
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 01:01 PM
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I bought "Rome in Detail" but haven't had the opportunity to use it yet. I will be taking it to Rome in October, along with my tried and true Blue Guide. I've been using a Blue Guide published in 1989 and finally broke down and bought the new edition. Unfortunately, it's not as detailed as the older version but if you really want details on art, architecture and history, it's one of the best available.
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 01:08 PM
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Of course, it depends upon your personal preferences, but when I always bring my Blue Guide and a classic called "The Companion Guide to Rome" by Georgina Masson, who was an art historian. It keeps going in and out of print, is only occasionally updated, and can be hard to find, but I'm devoted to it.

For something a bit lighter on the cultural details (figuratively, that is, it actually weighs a lot), but easier to use and still informative, I like the Eyewitness Guide, a/k/a/ Dorling Kindersley.

I don't recall seeing "Rome in Detail," but I'll have to check it out!
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 01:59 PM
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The Oxford Archaeological Guide to Rome by Amanda Claridge et al was the one book of several we brought along that we were constantly referring to, but of course it's primarily for archaeology buffs. We spent three full days just in the Forum and Palatine Hill areas and would have spent another three if we'd had the time.
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 02:19 PM
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I forgot all about the Oxford Archaeological Guide, which FlyFish used. It's fairly new, so I didn't use it on earlier visits, but before my last visit I read all the introductory material and photocopied the pages for the sites I knew I wanted to visit. It was very useful.
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 03:13 PM
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I highly recommend the guide KT mentioned, The Companion Guide to Rome. (It appears to be in-print as Amazon, for one, has it new for $24.95)

The Companion Guide to Paris, by Anthony Glyn, is also excellent.

If you're an architecture aficionado, I recommend An Architect's Rome, by John M. McGuire, Jr. Wonderful book with sketches by the author. Out-of-print but Amazon has used copies.
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Old Sep 9th, 2003, 06:13 PM
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I found a new reissue of H.V. Morton's A Traveller in Italy at Barnes and Noble. He is the best.
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Old Sep 10th, 2003, 12:09 PM
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We like Michelin Green. But look at several to see which ones suit you the best.
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Old Sep 10th, 2003, 12:26 PM
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If you are a visual person, a nice companion is the DK Eyewitness series guide on Rome. Filled with four-color photos, which is good if you are trying to locate something you've never seen before. You know, a picture is worth a thousand words...
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Old Sep 11th, 2003, 04:54 AM
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Hi
I thought Michelin Green was great for Rome. Quite a bit of detail on history, art, and such, and not to heavy to carry around. The index can be confusing, but I find the index lets me down in lots of guidebooks. Some entries are listed under the Italian name, some in English, etc.

I'd looked at the Blue Guide, but even as an art and architecture aficionado I found the Blue to have too much info--I could read it or I could walk, but I couldn't do both.

I had bought the Companion Guide to Rome
that KT mentioned, but again, for me, it was better for pre-trip reading than as an on-site guide.

The Rome in Detail is new to me, I'll have a browse in a bookstore.
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