Atomic Clock & Airport Security

Oct 2nd, 2006, 10:44 AM
  #1  
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Atomic Clock & Airport Security

I was wondering if any of you guys have taken an atomic alarm clock thru international airport security? Any problems?

Also, how well do the atomic clocks work in central europe (Germany, Austria, Czech, & Hungary)
Thanks
WildFlowers is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 10:49 AM
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There is nothing atomic about them.

They're run-of-the-mill digital timepieces with a radio receiver that automatically resets them to an atomic time standard (typically) once a day. Here's the skinny:

http://tf.nist.gov/stations/radioclocks.htm
Passepartout is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 10:58 AM
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p.s. If you need extremely accurate time in Europe (or anywhere else, for that matter), use a GPS. The precision of the entire system is time-based.
Passepartout is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 11:01 AM
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Years before those things were even dreamed of in the US, they were standard in Germany ;-) and the UK. An atomic clock is just a marketing gag, those are infact long wave radio recievers. DCF 77 is broadcasting the acutal time on 77.5khz. The french transmitter is compatible, the UK version (of course) isn't. I would bet your "atomic clock" is of no use whatsoever in Europe. The german transmitter is located in Frankfurt and covers Europe down to Greece. Alarm clocks cost well under 10€, watches are more expensive. Airport security? Very unlikely!
logos999 is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 12:40 PM
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logos999,

I have often wondered if my La Crosse multi-function clock would work in Europe. The first time I saw anything like this was years ago in Holland. True, it is just as "atomic" as fried eggs but it is a great timepiece and weather station. It keeps good time because it receives a radio signal from Colorodo. The Dutch version did the same but received its signal from somewhere over there.

Has anyone brought an American "atomic" clock to Europe and does it receive operating signals as it does here?

hopscotch is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2006, 03:31 PM
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Some modern watches indeed can handle different standards. The "77.5Khz DCF system" from Paris/Frankfurt is so common and easy to recieve in central Europe that it the watch was multi standard this would surely be included.
logos999 is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 11:56 AM
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I got an "international" atomic alarm clock at The Sharper Image. Should I just scrap it and get a regular alarm clock? I will be on a tour so I got to have an reliable alarm clock.
WildFlowers is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 12:14 PM
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>"international" atomic alarm clock
The manual will tell you. If you're going to central/western Europe look for DCF77 (that's the name of the transmitter). If it is mentioned there it should work. As I said, it's a VERY common standard.
logos999 is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 12:24 PM
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And if you want to buy an alarm clock in Europe ask for "radio controlled", "atomic" sounds "dangerous" and will probably produce a laugh ;-)
logos999 is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 03:23 PM
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Any "atomic" clock will keep time anywhere in the world, whether it can receive the correction broadcast or not. It simply won't re-calibrate itself to the accurate timebase once a day.
Passepartout is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 03:27 PM
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You'd have to live on Colorado time during your holiday unless you find the adjust button
logos999 is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2006, 04:07 PM
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You'd have to live on Colorado time during your holiday unless you find the adjust button
Passepartout is offline  
Oct 4th, 2006, 12:42 AM
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The problem with alarms is usually not whether they are telling the time correctly and waking you up a minute too soon or too late. The problem is usually whether you set it right and pushed the correct buttons, like the dreaded AM and PM (as opposed to the European 24-hour settings), and whether you did or forgot to set the "alarm" as opposed to some other function.

The "atomic" radio signals won't set your alarm!

So don't worry about "atomic" or radio-control, just set its clock to the time zone you're in and REMEMBER TO SET the alarm. Any alarm will do - it's pilot error that you have to avoid, so pick a gadget that's easy to set, without fiddly buttons that you can mess up when tired or otherwise incapacitated, like after that French wine tasting tour or a German beer keller visit...
WallyKringen is offline  
Oct 4th, 2006, 08:42 AM
  #14  
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Thanks everyone! I'm not taking the "ATOMIC" or Radio-Controlled clock. It is too complicated to set! It has 4 buttons and you have to know the correct sequences to set the time.
After my many German pivos I doubt I'll remember!!!
Thanks again!
WildFlowers is offline  

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