Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Are you following Scotland's upcoming vote on independence?

Are you following Scotland's upcoming vote on independence?

Old Sep 21st, 2014, 12:26 PM
  #181  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 720
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
beign = being
dotheboyshall is offline  
Old Sep 21st, 2014, 01:05 PM
  #182  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"Where is Dickie Greenleaf?"

Sobering up in The Bahamas.

Well that's that.

Country Estates 55%
Council Estates 45%

The Trout was right we are an affluent nation, so affluent that those with money and sense realised how they gained their money and sense.

So ends the storm in the best cuppa china.

All a little side show for when Dave decides to let everyone have a vote on EU membership.

That's when the real fun starts, If Britain votes OUT of the EU then there will be another referendum here and the result will be YES to leave Britain.

"Also, this is the first I've heard of the Barnett agreement. How on earth did that happen?"

Much of it down to the provision of public services in rural areas, our refuse man says the graveyard shift, the one everyone wants to avoid, is a round which involves emptying the bins of 33 houses : it takes 5 hours. I cycled down the back roads of Galloway forest today, 33 miles of perfectly maintained roads, subjected to terrible extremes of weather. I passed around 10 houses, I presume that without Barnett they would be expected to pay for the upkeep of their own roads.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Old Sep 21st, 2014, 06:41 PM
  #183  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,989
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Did you hear David Cameron's remarks the day after the vote?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D3XRvxDbHM

Reaction?
latedaytraveler is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 04:22 AM
  #184  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 6,144
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The Barnett formula is a calculation of spend based on population, not the need or cost of services by location. It dates to the 1970s. Actually, it's slightly more complicated than that in that it applies to costs/services that fall under the devolved powers, not absolutely all public expenditure, but you get the gist.

As things currently stand spending is higher (per person) in Northern Ireland and Scotland than in England and Wales. There are calls to revisit this formula and allocate budgets more on a 'need' basis. I have no idea whether that will actually happen or not though.
RM67 is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 05:02 AM
  #185  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 20,928
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As I understand, it's a calculation of the <i>variation</i> of spend by comparison with previous years, rather than a baseline recalculation every year. So of course, over time, it's all got a bit out of kilter. But just like (whisper it) revaluation of properties for council tax purposes, it's always been seen as the can at the back of the cupboard that you don't dare open.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 06:55 AM
  #186  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Sorry RM

I'll be more specific, as far as I see it the formula wasn't designed to take into consideration a needs based approach but it hasn't been changed over time in an attempt to allow a needs based allocation.

However, It has been clearly unfair and too transparent to allow free University education in Scotland whilst English students have run up £40,000 debts.

There seems so many obvious answers to many political issues :

Like scrapping council tax and adding it to income tax
Like adding University fees on to a graduate tax
Like reducing benefits and increase the National minimum wage
Like simplifying the tax credits system to allow employees to work more than 24 hours a week
Like effectively computerising the NHS and introducing central purchasing
Like centralising many government functions such as IT and HR which are replicated 100s times over in each region
Like making EU subsidies more transparent and fair : if some of you knew what went on in farming, there would be a vote to be OUT very soon.

Maybe the answers are to simple but I am still puzzled as to why the government thinks an over 65 with little income should pay a tax based on the value of their house.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 09:39 AM
  #187  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 25,149
Received 4 Likes on 3 Posts
flpab,

George Heriot's is a great school! My brother, cousin, nieces and nephews all attended. Some still do! My sister and I could not because the school was only for boys many years ago. Another excellent private school in Edinburgh is George Watson's College, where I taught for several years before moving to the US. Both are expensive, but in Edinburgh it is important to send your children to the best school you can afford and the schools, especially Heriot's, offer bursaries to less financially able families.
Barbara is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 11:05 AM
  #188  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This punter was definitely on the edge of his seat last week!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-29313880
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 12:04 PM
  #189  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 720
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<i>but in Edinburgh it is important to send your children to the best school you can afford </i>

??????
dotheboyshall is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 01:49 PM
  #190  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 57,091
Received 5 Likes on 3 Posts
Miss Brodie is alive and well and living in Edinburgh, apparently.
annhig is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 02:02 PM
  #191  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,989
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
ANNHIG, I just love that film, THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE - thanks for bringing it to mind.
latedaytraveler is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 02:10 PM
  #192  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 57,091
Received 5 Likes on 3 Posts
my pleasure, Late day.
annhig is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 03:56 PM
  #193  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 25,149
Received 4 Likes on 3 Posts
dotheboyshall, it's something that is peculiar to Edinburgh.
Anyone who lives there, or who has lived there, with children of school age will understand. Anyone who went to school there will know exactly what I mean. If you read Alexander McCall Smith's Scotland Street series you'll get the idea.

Muriel Spark attended the same school that I did, years before me though. She based Miss Jean Brodie on one of her teachers there.
Barbara is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 04:12 PM
  #194  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 27,615
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
So, are you saying that the state (US public) schools in Edinburgh are peculiarly bad? What about Glasgow?
thursdaysd is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 04:43 PM
  #195  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,989
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Speaking of books let's throw in one of my favorites:

HOW THE SCOTS INVENTED THE MODERN WORLD: The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World & Everything in It written by American historian Arthur Herman which examines the origins of the Scottish Enlightenment and what impact it had on the modern world.

It's an excellent read for those on both sides of the question.
latedaytraveler is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 04:48 PM
  #196  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 25,149
Received 4 Likes on 3 Posts
No, although if fewer kids, the creme de la creme as Jean Brodie would have said, went to private schools the overall standard would probably improve. I don't think this is such an issue in Glasgow.
Barbara is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 05:21 PM
  #197  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 9,171
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Why did my reply get triangled after latedaytravler's asking us about Cameron's speech. I said nothing bad and just mentioned Tony Blair and someone else posted they like Tony until he got involved with GWB. Very strange.
Barbara, a local school had 75 students withdraw for home schooling here in Fl. Very poor education system so bravo to parents that can do more. I know one that is doing it and they all have an online teacher, have to put in the time and work but still think they are missing out. I love Alexander McCall Smith's Scotland Street series and the Sunday Philosophy Club series. Really gave me to desire to visit Edinburgh. I listened to those on cd driving to work. Isabel Dalhousie made Scotland come to life.
flpab is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 05:58 PM
  #198  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,989
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi again FLPAB,

"... a local school had 75 students withdraw for home schooling here in Fl. Very poor education system so bravo to parents that can do more." First off, where is "FI"?

Sorry, but as a public school teacher in the US for many decades, I just can't buy "home schooling." And I have taught in urban/minority districts and upscale suburban school systems. Admittedly, the web has enhanced learning opportunities for those who choose this route - BUT!

In the US, the parents of "home schoolers" usually choose this option because they do not want their children "contaminated" by liberal thinking. In my view, no way can parents replicate the academic and social experience the child would have in a public school, even one that is wanting.
latedaytraveler is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2014, 11:03 PM
  #199  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 20,928
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If sending your children to a fee-paying school is more in evidence in Edinburgh, it's more likely to be because of the greater preponderance of parents from the sort of social backgrounds that would (anywhere in the UK) tend to send their children to fee-paying schools - professional, upper middle classes.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Old Sep 23rd, 2014, 02:24 AM
  #200  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 720
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Actually I have lived in Edinburgh for several years so know a bit about Edinburgh schools

Not everyone decides their little dear should go to a private school, many - even with substantial incomes - use the state sector

Perhaps it is the tendency of the private schools to use distinctive uniforms that gave you the wrong impression
dotheboyshall is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Your Privacy Choices -