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April in Ireland

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Nov 20th, 2009, 05:46 AM
  #1
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April in Ireland

I have the option of going to Ireland April 23- May 1 or June and after. What are your thoughts about April...too much wind, rain, etc. I think should be less traveled and less expensive but will it be so cold that walking will not be pleasant? Thanks so much.
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Nov 20th, 2009, 06:24 AM
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I've been to Ireland a number of times, in April -- '99, '01, '03 and '06, once in Feb, in '02, and the remainder, ('00,'04, '05, '07, '08 and '09) in June.

Many times, the weather in April was warmer and drier than some of my June trips ... but, that's more of a 'Luck-Of-The-Draw' kinda thing. A couple of Aprils, I was regaled with tales of how HORRIBLE the weather had been, just before our arrival.

Extra daylight is a plus, in June -- the sun rises before 5 AM and it never really gets dark until after 10 PM --

Crowds ARE less, in April, but not everything is open then, either. Airfare tends to rise some, in April, and then, once again, in June.

Hope this helps --

Bob
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Nov 20th, 2009, 06:42 AM
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A number of Irish I know recommend April. Also, a Scotsman I know suggested April for Scotland too.

I spent two weeks in Ireland in August and it rained every single day. I'm still bitter.

gruezi
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Nov 20th, 2009, 07:06 AM
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I LOVED Ireland in April. I went for a week, starting April 19 in 2002, and it was about 65 during the day and got down to 45-50 at night. We stayed in Kilkenny (mid-south). It misted most mornings, was sunny most days, and only really rained one day all day. We were fine with light jackets/shawls, and good shoes for walking on wet grass

Just don't go on easter weekend - prices and crowds rise a lot!
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Nov 20th, 2009, 07:28 AM
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I was there in late March/early April in '07 and had absolutely gorgeous weather. But then we had perfect weather there this past June too. Well, perfect weather everyday except the day of our daughter's wedding! And, from what her in-laws have told us, most of the rest of the summer was lousy.

To sort of paraphrase Bob and gruezi, in Ireland weather is definitely a luck of the draw kind of thing. And, as Bob said, in April you will find that not everything is open. I'd love to do the banquet at Dunguaire Castle but have missed it because I've been in the area at the wrong time of year. However, for me, fewer tourists still make it a good trade-off. Whether that's the case for you will depend a lot on what you want to do.

Where you're from may make a difference too. You mention worrying that it'll be too cold to walk around. Both times that I've been there in March/April, it's been warmer than it was in Chicago. Ireland is damp so the chill can seem to go right through you. But it doesn't get nearly as cold there as it does here. And spring comes earlier in terms of blooming flowers.

Whatever you decide, enjoy it!
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Nov 20th, 2009, 12:11 PM
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Further proof that weather in Ireland is 'Catch-As-Catch-Can'(and TOTALLY unpredictable!):

http://www.rte.ie/news/2009/1120/weather.html

Bob
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Nov 20th, 2009, 04:06 PM
  #7
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Thanks so much for your input. It sounds that I might just wait until June to get good weather and not get it then. I may take a chance at latter April. I like less tourists and looking for the countryside views mostly. Ohhh, and the Irish and music. Will the pubs still be open with music? Music and countryside take priority. Thanks again. Mycuppajava TN
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Nov 20th, 2009, 06:02 PM
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It will be less crowded in April but will also likely be cooler. However, Ireland doesn't get either really hot in the summer or really cold in the winter. I goes from warmish to coolish to chilly with a whole lot of damp thrown in.

April will probably be similar to that in mid Atlantic states - not the "mud: season you get in New England. I've been 5 times at various times of year and prefer May and June for the longer days.
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Nov 20th, 2009, 06:53 PM
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Mycup,although Ireland can be very rainy at any time, April is the month with the lowest rainfall according to Weather.com.

And the new lambs arrive at that time of year....
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Nov 23rd, 2009, 12:56 PM
  #10
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What would you estimate the temp to be and would the chill factor be high? Thanks.
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Nov 23rd, 2009, 01:16 PM
  #11
 
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You should free yourself from the illusion that you can in anyway whatsoever foresee the weather in Ireland. Period. That's what you call a maritime climate. You rarely have stable weather conditions.

You can scan a hundred websites for "average weather", and still run into one week of non-stop sunshine, or one week of non-stop rain at any given time of the year.

I get to Ireland 4-5 times each year, and the best weather by far was in March this year. I was hiking in only a t-shirt. and sweating. In May, it was okay, in August it was probably the coldest weather of all three trips.
Last year it was the other way around.
The year before, Ireland almost drowned in rain most of the year, and I picked by chance twice the only week with sunshine.
Anecdotal "evidence" that June was nice in 2008 or April was rainy in 2007 is worth absolutely nothing. So are statistics.

Pack a t-shirt, a pullover/sweatshirt, rainproof-jacket (goretex or the likes), and waterproof comfortable shoes that can take a bit of mud. The countryside can be pretty dirty

And yes, the pubs are open and always fun. The more rural you get, the more the live music will be on weekends only, or at least not on any given day of the week. Your local hosts will be able to direct you to the right places.
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Nov 23rd, 2009, 05:38 PM
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Hey Cowboy!! You really made me feel very good about April. Now, if you will help me with where I should rent a car and the insurance I need. And then, after you have delivered your expertise, I will request a look-see of my itinerary. Thanks again, Cowboy.
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Nov 23rd, 2009, 09:59 PM
  #13
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Mycuppajava - You will have a great advantage going around 23rd April when it comes to the rare spring flowers that bloom for a short period in The Burren.
I have no doubt you will pass through this treeless limestone plateau as you head to the 2500BC Poulnabrone Dolmen.

The rarest and hardest to find is bright blue Gentian Violet.
I searched and searched down the cracks and crevices but I don't think the little blue flower I found was it! This was about the 2nd week May so they might have finished blooming.
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Nov 24th, 2009, 09:25 AM
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There are many, many threads here about car rental companies and insurance in Ireland. And probably nearly as many different opinions! Here are a few to get you started:

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...in-ireland.cfm

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...e-question.cfm

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...in-ireland.cfm

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...-confusion.cfm
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Nov 25th, 2009, 12:25 PM
  #15
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Thanks so much for everyone's input. It is so kind of you to give such helpful inputs. God Bless.

I think I am going to go to Ireland in April and maybe rent from Dooley...I have read good reports and have emailed them directly so I can print that out for what it's worth.

I think we can get Group A or B with super CDW for $396 for nine days. I think this is total output of $$$.

Any input on this would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks from TN
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Nov 25th, 2009, 01:13 PM
  #16
 
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Two pieces of advice to consider --

If you phone up the New Jersey office and PREPAY, the charge will be in US dollars, in the US, so there would be NO 'Foreign Transaction Fee' -- typically, 3% --

On arrival, you WILL be charged for your initial tank of fuel -- 40 - 80 Euro, but that is refundable, if you return the car full.

Dooley seems to keep their fleet longer than most - in 2008, we were give an '05, with over 60,000 Kilometers on it, and in '08 we were given an '06 with about 90,000.

Nothing wrong with the cars, mind you, just a little more 'worn around the edges'than most ...

Bob
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Nov 28th, 2009, 09:54 AM
  #17
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I have been researching the WMC just out of curiosity. My understanding is, that you get the deny the CDW but you are still responsibly for the 1000-1500 euros. I take it that that means that you have to pay out-of-pocket that amount should you have an accident. In that case, would the excess CDW not be better? There is so much in the small print and this is my understanding. Is this correct, or am I still not out of the tunnel? Thanks, Bob
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Nov 28th, 2009, 06:55 PM
  #18
 
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If you use the credit card to waive the CDW, you CAN'T purchace the 'Super-CDW', or you VOID the Credit Card coverage. The CC covers you for damages, (less VAT), but does NOT cover tires, glass or undercarraige.
MOST times the 'Super-CDW' doesn't either, but SOME do.

TO USE THE cc, YOU WOULD GET A bASIC, OR EXCLUSIVE QUOTE -- AN inclusive QUOTE INCLUDES CDW, WITH A 1-1500 Euro deductable. The 'Super' (also called EXCESS), lowers the deductale to 100 Euro.

Basic CDW generally only adds 25-75 Euro to the rental. The 'Super' (Excess) is what costs -- between 10-15 Euro Per DAY -- so that it can add 70-105 Euro ( 105-160 US$) onto the weekly rental. Using the CC coverage reduces your cost by 150-200 US$, which can go a long way towards any final, 'out-of-pocket' damage cost.

If you call the Dooley Office in New Jersey (Toll-Free 1-800-331-9301), the staff there will give you a full disclosure price, 'All-In', that details EVERYTHING, except the initial tank of fuel (since that varies, by the actual vehicle that you receive). Unless they have changed their polocy since last June, THAT fee is refundable, if you return the car with a full tank.

Hope this helps,

Bob
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Nov 29th, 2009, 11:55 AM
  #19
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I am reaching out on a limb, I know, but, Bob, would you go with or w/o the WMC? The more I read, the more confused I am. Oh, and thanks so much for you feed. It really helps all of us. Mycuppajava
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Nov 30th, 2009, 07:38 AM
  #20
 
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I would recommend that you do whichever you are most comfortable with, financially and emotionally ...

Over the last 10 years, we have visited Ireland 11 times - never for less than 8 days 'on the ground' and usually, for 15 days -- and we have NEVER purchased CDW or 'Super-CDW', relying upon a Platinum MasterCard from '99-2006 and then, a World MasterCard every year since then.

In June of '05, swerving to avoid a big, road-hogging truck on the main road from Killarney to Kilorglin, the rear tire smacked a pot-hole, causing a nasty bulge in the side-wall. It cost me 100 Euro, out of pocket, for a new tire.

Last June, driving on a side road in East Cork after dark, I once again had a violent encounter with what was surely the Mother of all potholes. I was traveling about 50 KPH and it shattered the front passenger tire and BENT the alloy rim. A tire shop straightened the rim and replaced the tire for 150 Euros. When I returned the car, the rear passenger tire was ever-so-slightly bulged and there was a small split begining, close to the rim. Dooley charged me 150 Euro, for THAT tire. Total out-of-pocket -- 300 Euro. MC does NOT cover tires.

Had I purchased the insurances from Dooley (which I THINK covers tires??? although MOST companies DO NOT!), the total claim would have been about 1000 Euros (as they doubtless would have REPLACED the alloy rim, rather than fix it).

The CDW would have cost about 50 Euro, the Super (at 12 Euro per day x 16 days) would have added 192 Euros and with the extra VAT on the insurance, it would have equaled 200 Euro total -- PLUS the 100 Euro Deductable and we have a net, out-of-pocket of -- 300 Euro.

Obviously, I don't expect to lose a tire (or MULTIPLES) every year, so I figure that I have 'SAVED' about 1500 - 2000 Euro over the last 10 years -- more than enough to 'COVER' any unexpected loss, should one happen in the future.

But, Peace of Mind is a tangable, but VERY Subjective thing.

Arriving in Ireland from the US, after a sleepless, over-night flight can play Hell with your Peace Of Mind and spending two weeks DREADING the wisdom of your 200 Euro decision CAN ruin what should be a joyous and care-free time.

Ultimately, it's YOUR call.

Bob
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