Ann Frank House

Jun 28th, 2000, 12:46 PM
  #1  
Rod Hoots
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Ann Frank House

Will be in Amsterdam one day on a cruise. We finish a morning tour downtown at 12:30 and must leave at 4:00 to board the ship. Would we have time to visit the Ann Frank House? Thanks.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 01:00 PM
  #2  
Meg
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In theory, yes. It just depends on how long the line is. We spent about a half hour in line (and we were there first thing in the a.m.) and an hour in the museum itself. Hope this helps - enjoy Amsterdam.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 01:41 PM
  #3  
lisa
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Yes, I agree, it only takes about an hour or so to see the house. Even if there's a long line the whole thing should only take a couple of hours total. Definitely worth doing.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 01:55 PM
  #4  
Paul
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Rod,
Don't miss it, you'll have plenty of time. Take a taxi there if time is running short, or head off on foot towards the Westerkerk's tower - it's very near the church along the Prinsengracht. (The little bronze statue of Anne is in the courtyard of the church). The self-guided tour of the house is extremely informative and very moving.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 02:53 PM
  #5  
kathy
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On a Friday in May at 11:30AM waited 20 minutes, and spent another hour inside. I do hope you fit it into your schedule. The tour is very moving and well documented throughout the home. More importantly, if you go soon, you will experience the heat and experience first-hand what the family endured trapped inside during the summer on the third floor without the luxury of using the facet for water or bathroom during the day.That thought haunted me! For obvious reasons, it was a highlight(?) of our visit to Amsterdam - and the visit I appreciated more than any of the museums. Although I left the home with a sinking feeling, I will remember that tour forever - and The House is what I talk about first when asked about Amsterdam. I wasn't prepared for the impact it had on me. Please try to get there. I think you'll regret missing it. Enjoy your cruise and your short stop in Amsterdam. I think you'll like the city.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 06:13 PM
  #6  
Rod Hoots
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Thank you all very much. The best responses I have seen in a long time in the forums.
 
Jun 28th, 2000, 08:41 PM
  #7  
Holly
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Be sure to check out the toilet they used (their's, not the public ones). It's all that blue hand-painted porcelain. Even the bowl.
 
Jul 2nd, 2000, 03:35 PM
  #8  
Bill
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Well, I guess I'm the emotionless grouch of this group. I went to the Anne Frank house because my wife wanted to. I had heard her story, of course, but had never read the book. While the visit was interesting, it didn't mean nearly as much to me as it seems to mean to others.
I would say the van Gogh Museum and the Rijksmuseum are FAR more "not-to-be-missed" than the Anne Frank House, unless her book made a major impression on you when/if you read it. Indeed, just walking along the beautiful canals would be my choice over waiting in line for the Frank House.
(Bring on the flames!)
 
Jul 2nd, 2000, 07:38 PM
  #9  
Gina
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Not a flame at all, Bill--I'd just venture to say that probably the reason Anne Frank's house didn't make much of an impression on you was *because* you hadn't read the book. As someone who first read Anne's diary at age ten (and has reread it subsequently several times), I could barely handle the emotional power of the place. Everywhere I stepped I felt like I was walking through ghosts. Anne's "movie stars" on the wall, and the little room Peter van Daan had where Anne had her first kiss...every little piece of that house was intensely moving for me, because in a sense I grew up with Anne Frank.

My traveling companion, who, like you, hadn't read the diary, was impressed by the place and showed an interest in (maybe) reading the book later on, but it also didn't mean all that much to him. Considering, though, how many languages Anne's diary has been translated into and how many copies are in print, I'd venture to say that a fair majority of people will have at least read it once and will be particularly touched by visiting the site. If you *haven't* yet read the diary and are planning a visit, I'd recommend taking it along as your airline reading.
 
Jul 3rd, 2000, 02:26 AM
  #10  
Kristy
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I just returned from a 12 day European cruise that stopped in Amsterdam on 6/28. It is indeed better to try to see The Anne Frank House as early as possible in the am to avoid long lines. Any chance you might be able to do an afternoon shore excursion and go first thing to Anne Franks' in the morning? If not, then perhaps you could invetigate the possiblity of not returning to the ship after your morning excursion and going directly to Frank House rather than wasting the time going back to ship and then having to be bussed back into the city. I had visited 20 years ago, and the Anne Frank house has been positively redone and expanded to be a much more meaningful experience, especially the displays at the end that let you know that hate and evil are unfortunately still alive on our planet with Neo-Nazi activities still surfacing. Chilling, gripping, and eye-opening for adults and children alike. If you have kids in tow, there are several excellent books geared to younger students ages 7+ that explain Anne Frank's life & story with great care and thoughtful emotion. I checked out several from my library before the trip and my daughter certainly benefitted from the overview.
Even my husband gleaned some background from these books as he had not read the diary.
Hope this lenghty message helps!

Kristy
 
Jul 3rd, 2000, 03:04 AM
  #11  
W
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I have to agree with Bill. I was moved by the book and the play, but I was a bit disappointed by the house. It didnít add anything more to the terrible significance of those events or my empathy for Annís tragically short life. But I canít say, ďdonít goĒ because I donít know the level of your engagement with the text. Kathy and Gina's responses shows that it can be a very powerful experience. Given the long lines and the rather modest display, you might also ask yourself why you came to Amersterdam..what is it that you feel you need to see. I prefer to go to the museums (I love the Tropem, for example, which in a way expresses more fully the cultural tolerance that Ann pleaded for) or bikes ride to the countryside or simply hanging out in a cafe, reading and trying to talk with people. I worry too, sorry if I put this clumsily, that displays like the Ann Frank House have in some way distorted our relationship with the past, making it a bit superficial and -perhaps this is the same- unreflectingly concrete. How many people say, casually and good naturedly but also with a bit of callousness, ďIíve seen it.Ē Any day I expect to see a sign: Ladies and Gentlman, this way to the killing fields. Lunch in the Foyer at 1:00.
 

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