American-style Diner in Paris

Mar 24th, 2004, 09:42 AM
  #1  
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American-style Diner in Paris

For those who a)"don't like French food" b) need to stay within a budget or c)like to see how the French cook "American" , this restaurant might interest you:

http://www.breakfast-in-america.com/

Includes diner counter, toaster at your table, and bottomless coffee. Haven't been there, just saw it in a recent MetropoleParis issue...
Travelnut is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 11:32 AM
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1. Are there such people?
2. If so, what can be done to correct the problem?
tomboy is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 11:40 AM
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On a similiar note, we ran across a place called Indiana Cafe in the 7th and couldn't resist -- it was a French chefs take on an American sports bar serving southwestern/mexican cuisine--quite interesting.
swalter518 is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 11:56 AM
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This restaurant is almost next door to Hotel Minerve. I was not impressed. But if my 11yr old son had had his way he would have been eating there every meal.
vino is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 12:01 PM
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tomboy, you must have missed the post from the college travelers who stated they didn't care for French food...

I like seeing how things I do at home are "done" in France, ie. movies (we don't get salty AND sweet popcorn, nevermind beer(Amsterdam)), groceries (gotta learn the 'weigh and tag your own produce', bring your own bag routine), etc. So why not restaurants?

And I KNOW bottomless coffee is going to appeal to somebody!
Travelnut is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 12:34 PM
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How vile, you may as well save the money and stay at home.
m_kingdom is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 12:40 PM
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Never thought I'd find myself agreeing 100% with m_kingdom. Does that mean I should rush out and buy a lottery ticket?
FlyFish is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 12:44 PM
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Actually, what would be even more vile would be a British-style breakfast place in Paris.
StCirq is online now  
Mar 24th, 2004, 12:53 PM
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British breakfasts - the fatty variety are equally vile too, yes.
m_kingdom is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 01:38 PM
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I always thought that restaurants like this were for locals who wanted a taste of foreign (to them) cooking. I cannot imagine traveling from the U.S. to France and eating at an American-style restaurant -- what a waste of opportunity. There are never enough meals during my trips for me to enjoy all the local foods I want to eat!
sandykins is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 01:57 PM
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Not all Americans in Paris are tourists. I expect most of their business is from expats, living in Paris. Travelling for a few days at a time is one thing. . living there for an extended time, you develope a need to "reconnect" from time to time, and one way to do that is a meal at one of these kinds of places.

There used to be one just off St. Germaine near Odeon Metro that was full of expats on Sunday mornings.


Rich
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Mar 24th, 2004, 02:17 PM
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Thanks for the info Travelnut... As an Expat in Paris I allow myself the occassional indulgence of american food although it usually isnt as good as the real thing! I will give this place a try.
MorganB is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 02:23 PM
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It appears that most of the customers are in fact Expat Americans. The biggest clue was all the photos of the "Dean for America" meetings.
bardo is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 07:59 PM
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I've never understood what people mean when they say "I don't like French food". Food in France is as varied according to region as it is in the USA. Much of the food in northern US is different from food in the south or food in the southwest or New England etc. The same is true in France. Food in the Dordogne is distinctive as it is in Alsace-Lorraine, Provence or Haut cuisine and others. Go figure.

In addition to that; learning about different foods in different lands is a large part of the joy of traveling. Traveling to Paris and then looking for an "American Graffiti" restaurant must certainly be a felony in France punishable by immediate deportation.

Larry J
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Mar 24th, 2004, 09:21 PM
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If you want really awful American-type food, try Buffalo Grill. It's a chain all over France. It was absolutely the only place open one day so we ate there. Next time I'll starve! It even included country western music . . . gaaaaaaaaack.
SalB is offline  
Mar 24th, 2004, 10:12 PM
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Sandykins has got it in one. But if a tourist absolutely MUST do it (why?), then SalB's suggestion of Buffalo Grill is right on. They're all around Paris. And there is a place in Paris that does English breakfasts (note I didn't say "British", because as with the USA, they vary by country within Britain). But again, it's for locals who want something foreign, or ex-Pat Brits who're on a nostalgia trip. I saved my English breakfasts for when I got to England (and my Welsh ones for when I got to Wales...and so on...).
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