A chacun son goût

Old Jan 8th, 2011, 09:04 AM
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But if 'propre' is before the noun, it's one thing; after, another. Yes?
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Old Jan 8th, 2011, 09:27 AM
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Yes, before the noun it means "own", after the noun it means "clean": ma propre chambre = my own room; ma chambre propre = my clean room. EJ
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Old Jan 8th, 2011, 04:40 PM
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I accept my French Friends who live from one coast to the other.
Chacun son Gout.
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Old Dec 12th, 2011, 12:37 PM
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This has been a bloody fascinating thread, for which I am most grateful to all inputters. Merci à tous. Chacun son goût.
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Old Dec 12th, 2011, 01:03 PM
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Funny to see this again.

Since the original post, DH and I visited Aix and our wait person (3rd year law student btw) said "The carrots are cooked" is another figure of speech-like it's a "done deal"? Les carottes sont cuites. Another was Lécher la vitrine. Window shopping-literally licking the window. Anyone know those?

But if someone did say "Chacun a son goût" without the accent on the 'a', doesn't it read 'each has his taste"? Not incorrect is it even if it isn't the actual expression? N'est-ce pas?
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Old Dec 12th, 2011, 01:14 PM
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Not incorrect but not the expression.

Les carottes sont cuites and lèche-vitrine are very common expressions.
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Old Dec 12th, 2011, 01:48 PM
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Haha! I clicked on this thread simply because I was intrigued by the expression 'A chacun son goût'. I am 41, from just south east of Paris and like Palenque's son, have never heard this expression used by anyone around me. It sounds perfectly right but very literary and proper. Everyone I know says "Chacun ses goûts", which is what I say. A lot of expressions are indeed regional and/or generational.
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Old Feb 16th, 2012, 06:53 AM
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Utter, pedantic bollocks.
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Old Feb 18th, 2012, 08:31 AM
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And it should have been the carrots are SLICED not cooked.

Welcome to Fodor's, Gary_Wise....there is a separate pedant thread for your continued reading pleasure. O
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Old Feb 18th, 2012, 08:40 AM
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yes, i wonder what brought Gary here [love the photo, Gary] just to tell us that?
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Old Feb 18th, 2012, 08:45 AM
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I too loved the photo but was afraid he'd think I was a stalker if I mentioned it! Thanks, annhig... now he can think you are.
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Old Feb 18th, 2012, 09:18 AM
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thanks, TD - didn't think of that.

perhaps i should post mine to put him off!
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Old Feb 18th, 2012, 10:24 AM
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Wonder where he is located in the world. I am going to steal his phrase. Utter pedantic bullocks. One of my friend likes 'posturing phonies'.
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Old Feb 19th, 2012, 03:00 AM
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it's "Bollocks" TD, with 2 "o"s.

surprised it got past the thought police, really.
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Old Oct 2nd, 2012, 09:02 AM
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A chacun son doute!
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Old Oct 2nd, 2012, 10:51 AM
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A great old thread. By the way, the Flanders and Swann bit uses a bilingual pun. Madeira and other strong drink (such as Port) were thought to cause gout, hence the pronounced gout rhyme in English. The other pun I saw using a mussed up chacun/gout reference was on Chowhound, discussing whether or not Brie chould be eaten when firm or runny: A chacun son goo.
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Old May 13th, 2013, 12:30 PM
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a chacun a ses gouts now my French son says may be the way to say a phrase that he, with a BAC with honors in French language and going to French school, says he has never ever heard - still today when I asked him1
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Old May 13th, 2013, 12:43 PM
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Maybe it is a regional expression for every region except where he lives.

Anyway, it is amusing to see that this thread refuses to die.
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Old May 13th, 2013, 06:32 PM
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>

Hilarious.
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Old May 14th, 2013, 08:17 AM
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St Cirq - are you in the Académie française? If not you should be, being an arbiter of what is proper French or not - even claiming to know more about what proper French is than my French son (BAC in French with honors!) or his Mama - bibliotequaire and incessant reader).

Anyway a chacun ses egouts!
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