A chacun son goût

Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 11:47 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 23,824
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
A chacun son goût

Over and over again, I see this mistakenly written as "Chacun a son goût" by English speaking people, including a tattoo around Robbie Williams' chest.

The correct expression is "à chacun son goût" -- "to each his own (taste)."

It is most certainly <b>not</b> "Each has his taste," which is the translation of that other formulation.

I hope some people have learned something.
kerouac is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 11:58 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 15,456
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 4 Posts
OK, I've learned something about word order (already knew about the "to" vs. "have" thing, but usually type without accents on an American keyboard). Thank you. Now that I've learned my new thing for the day, I will turn off my mind till tomorrow.
Nikki is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 12:05 PM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,418
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<It is most certainly not "Each has his taste," which is the translation of that other formulation.>

This would be useful on the "A Modest Proposal" thread over in the Lounge.
lennyba is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 12:52 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 9,023
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
French son just said "a chacun son gout" sounds really weird to him - having grown up in France he says he never heard that term - he says maybe in Quebec they use that

he says they never never say "a chacun son gout"

on a tous des gouts differents - he says you would say this but a chacun son gout he says is simply ridiculous - he says simply not something anyone would say

???
Palenque is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 01:27 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
They are possibly a bit different in Orléans. I certainly know kerouac's formulation, and I hear French more often in Brittany than in other parts of France (although I visit the Loire valley often enough, on average one year in three).

When in doubt, I find it best to use a different expression, and I like "on ne discute ni des goûts, ni des couleurs" ("one does not argue about taste or colour"). To my mind, it conveys the idea better.
Padraig is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 01:34 PM
  #6  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,699
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi K,

Well live and learn.

So Strauss got it wrong when he wrote "Chacun à son gout" in <i>Die Fledermaus</i>?

ira is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 01:39 PM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2,505
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"he says you would say this but a chacun son gout he says is simply ridiculous - he says simply not something anyone would say"

Well, Voltaire wrote it ...........
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 02:15 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,560
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I have never heard it any way other than `a chacun son goût. And I can recall Monsieur Vincent from 5th Grade correcting another student who said chacun à son goût.
StCirq is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 02:24 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 9,023
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I find it best to use a different expression, and I like "on ne discute ni des goûts, ni des couleurs" ("one does not argue about taste or colour").>

this he says is used but repeats never heard either version of Kerouac's versions. Tres mysteriuse - he did get honors in French BAC

perhaps it is an archaic expression found mainly in old French literature?

Or maybe in the Loiret, where along with Tourraine they say they speak 'pure French' it is not used?
Palenque is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 03:27 PM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Palenque wrote: "this he says is used ..."

Did you doubt me?
Padraig is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 03:34 PM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 5,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is EXACTLY why all of my tattoos are just pretty pictures- not phrases in languages I don't understand.
amwosu is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 03:52 PM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Your pretty pictures might well correspond with hieroglyphs and constitute an obscene message.
Padraig is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 04:38 PM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 5,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
True. I got a fleur de lis tat in a shop in the 8th Arr. and while it isn't obscene I understand not everyone is fond of the political symbolism. I didn't really care about old Clovis. I just think its pretty.
amwosu is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 04:47 PM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 554
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the chuckle, amwosu.
For what it's worth, this old French major (at a US college) was taught "a chacun son gout", just as kerouac noted. Maybe it's just an Anglo attempt to translate the untranslatable. Oftentimes adages don't translate well between languages, and another adage altogether better captures the meaning. Thank you Padraig and Palenque, "on ne discute ni des gouts, ni des couleurs" is a new one for moi. Always nice to learn something new. Merci, EJ (Please allow for the missing accents. I just can't find an easy way to type them on my keyboard. Any good suggestions out there?)
elsiejune is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 04:52 PM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,560
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
But it's just about an exact equivalent of "to each his own." It's not an issue of adages not translating between languages in this case.
StCirq is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 04:58 PM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 554
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Literal translation, of course it works, stcirq. But if what Palenque's son says is true, then it's not used in conversation to convey "to each his own".
elsiejune is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 05:24 PM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,560
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think Palenque's son is just incorrect in this instance. I hear the phrase all the time in France, and it definitely means to each his (own) taste.
StCirq is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 05:36 PM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 554
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Good to know. BTW, have you read "Foreign Tongue" by Vanina Morsot? It's the story of a translator, set in Paris. Lots of French/English word play peppered throughout. I really enjoyed it. EJ
elsiejune is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 05:46 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 4,510
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've been clueless all these years it seems. I always thought it was "Chacun a (accent grave) son gout" IE Each to his own taste.

I even used it the other day with -- as I imagined -- withering scorn, on a wordreference.com forum, in an Eng-Fr translation debate.

Live and learn.
tedgale is offline  
Old Nov 3rd, 2009, 06:11 PM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,560
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yes, I've read Foreign Tongue. Very interesting.
StCirq is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Your Privacy Choices -