Relief Band

May 14th, 2002, 10:30 AM
  #1  
Regina
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Relief Band

I'm leaving on the NCL Sun in a couple of weeks, and wanted to know if anyone had every tried using the Relief Band, and if so, what were your thoughts. I used Bonine on my last cruise, and while though it relieved my sea-sickness, it left me very, very drowsy. I'd love to find a solution that doesn't have adverse side-effects, but I'm skeptical about the Relief Band.
 
May 14th, 2002, 11:09 AM
  #2  
Statia
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My sister and her hubby got a prescription for motion sickness meds from their doctor before their cruise. It apparently worked so well that they were being hit up by other passengers wishing to buy some of the pills when they hit some rough seas.

 
May 14th, 2002, 11:31 AM
  #3  
xxx
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I used the wristbands and the ship I was on had some rough seas ... The rough seas didn't bother me so I guess wearing them helped. Not sure if it was psycological though.
 
May 15th, 2002, 01:06 AM
  #4  
Paul Therault
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It is just a theory that the relief bands work. I did speak to many that were wearing them on many ships. Most seem to wear them "just in case." Others were very sick.

Bonine and dramamine will work but you must take it from the time you get on the ship to the time you get off. You are correct Regina that you may sleep through the cruise.

The only other remedy that does work is the "patch." Can be purchased through your physician. Only after effect is dry-mouth. I have never seen anyone seasick wearing one even through the dreaded Drakes Passage.
I did read of one passenger on this forum that said it did not work so possibly it does not work for everyone but then one must read and follow the instructions carefully. Could also be the effect of too much liquor to counteract the dry-mouth.

Paul
 
May 16th, 2002, 10:19 AM
  #5  
Regina
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So I broke down and bought the Relief Band....I'll let you know how it goes. I am still skeptical (my nature, I guess) but perhaps if I believe strongly enough that it will work, it just may! We'll see what happens!! Thanks to all who responded.

"I do believe in fairies, I do believe in fairies....."
 
May 16th, 2002, 07:29 PM
  #6  
Harriette
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My doctor wouldn't give me a prescription for the patch. He said there were many side effects to using dry mouth being the least of it.
 
May 16th, 2002, 11:51 PM
  #7  
Paul Therault
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Hi Harriette,

The patch is not a narcotic. It is simply scopolamine which is a drug and must be prescribed. It delivers a small 1 mg dose over 3 days. It is an antihistamine. You may be taking other drugs such as sedatives or tranquilizers. Or you may have glaucoma. The patch may cause drowsiness or blurred vision which is a common caution. For example Benadryl is taken in 25 to 50 mg doses every 4 hours. These are heavy doses and there are many other side-effects along with drowsiness and blurred vision.

Find out from your doctor what the side effects are since the patch is taken by millions around the world.
Paul
 
May 17th, 2002, 08:33 AM
  #8  
Faina
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Paul, I would refrain from giving medical advices on this board. People may believe you. Only a doctor can determine what side effects can be dangerous. And what drug combination, if somebody's taking any, is dangerous. Even simple Tylenol overdose can cause serious side effects, and combined with alcohol can cause severe liver damage. You're trying to downsize a possible side effect of a prescription medication. I believe you don't have any medical education, do you? And I think it's highly irresponsible for you to give medical, not traveling advices. People may believe you.
 
May 17th, 2002, 04:39 PM
  #9  
Lauren
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I bought the reflief bands for my cruise because I get car sick, air sick and sea sick. After wearing them for a whole day the elastic from the bands was starting to annoy me so I took them off. I also had taken Bonine in addition to them to be fully covered in case of seasickness,at my house before I left for my cruise. The Bonine never made me drowsy and I had no side effects and I never got seasick. I didnt need the bands after all.
 
May 17th, 2002, 06:39 PM
  #10  
Harriette
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Paul I really wanted the patch but he said there are cases of distorted vision , dry mouth, sleepyness that don't even disappear when you remove the patch and other side effects that I can't remember now. I don't take any prescription meds so it wasn't a case of interaction. I will stick with bonine and the relief band as I have done before
 
May 17th, 2002, 11:17 PM
  #11  
Paul Therault
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Sorry, I guess I should have mentioned that I volunteer in a hospital emergency room and that is where I found out that the med in the patch is a form of antihistamine and the side effects are not that serious at all.

I know of many, many people that always were seasick on ships and were taking dramamine or bonine (more antihistamines) and switched to the patch because of being sleepy throughout the cruise. They suffered no after effects.

Possibly I should have my wife post.
She gets sick in the back seat of automobliles, on planes and always got deathly sick on ships. She started taking bromine but unless you take it throughout the entire cruise (not when you feel sick since it does not work immediately) it made her sleep through a few dinners and no liquor is allowed (including wine). Since she switched to the patch (many years ago) she loves it and has never been seasick even in very rough seas. It does give her drymouth which she does not mind since she can drink water.

I only heard of one passenger where the patch did not work so I presume it works only for most passengers.

The symptoms that Harriette spoke of are exactly what is printed on the patch label and also on the Benadryl label.

If bromine does not make one sleepy I would say go for it. Less money also.

Paul

 
May 18th, 2002, 07:03 PM
  #12  
Debbie
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Is there a difference in the reliability of the relief band vs. seabands. From what I've read the relief band is worn only on one wrist & it "zaps" you, while the other is pressure on both wrists. Also, I thought I read that the relief band is like $80, and the seabands are around $6. Any info on one vs. the other would be very helpful.

Thanks,

Debbie

P.S. - Paul is right about the patch working very well. I wear contact lenses and it really dries out your eyes as well as your mouth. That was the only real downside I found with them.
 
May 21st, 2002, 11:19 AM
  #13  
Karen
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My 13 year old niece was starting to experience motion sickness and within 3-5 minutes of correctly applying the sea bands she found relief. It would have been too late to take motion sickness pills at that point. I say bring them along. You'll have piece of mind.
 
May 21st, 2002, 12:21 PM
  #14  
Dana G
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My best friend used the relief band in March. She has a horrible inner ear problem that the Dr. calls vestibular.
She can get dizzy/nauseous riding in a cab or a train. Walking in a busy area with people "swirling" all around can send her into an attack.

Granted, we were in the Carribean, which is normally not rough, but she can get sick standing still.

The band worked wonderfully. She said the "shock" and the timing was almost comforting--like something she could time and depend on.

Go for it, and smooth sailing to you.
 
May 23rd, 2002, 09:28 AM
  #15  
Faina
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Had anybody tried ginger for motion sickness?
 
May 23rd, 2002, 10:50 AM
  #16  
Tim
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Just to set the rcord straight TansDerm Scop Patches, that are prescribed by physicians, do not contain an antihistamine as stated on this board. They contain scopolamine which is an anticholinergic agent. Antihistamines, ie, benadryl, Bonine ( which is meclizine ) all have anticholinergic activity but scopolamine is not an antihistamine.

The patches work very well for most people that use them. The biggest problem you have to watch out for is not washing your hands after you put it on and then touching your eye(s). If you do you can inadvertently place medicine into your eye which will dilate your pupil for the next 3 days. Not a good thing if your on a Caribbean cruise and want to lay out by the pool. ( The sunlight coming in that dilated pupil wold be very painful ) They also cause dry mouth, drowsiness, nausea, dizziness and must be used with caution in patients with bladder neck problems ( difficulty voiding ) or in people with glaucoma. My experience with these patches is that they work very well, with most people tolerating the side effects of dry mouth ( most common side effct ) without difficulty. Bonine works very well for many people but like first generation antihistamines can cause drowsiness. I have no experience with Relief Bands but the web site says it is "FDA cleared". I went to the FDA site and did a search on "Relief Bands" and did not return any information. The effect may be simply placebo or it may be physiological. If anyone out there has specific information on the studies done on this product please let me know. It certainly looks benign in it's use and I wouldn't tell a patient not to use it if they ask me about it. I would tell them to bring a backup method,ie, Bonine or the Patch, just to play it safe.

For more information on the TransDerm Patch go to:

http://www.transdermscop.com/site2/prescribe.html

 
May 23rd, 2002, 06:34 PM
  #17  
Charlie
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Good info Tim.....thanks.
 
May 23rd, 2002, 09:14 PM
  #18  
Paul Therault
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Thanks for the info Tim.

Paul
 
May 24th, 2002, 03:57 AM
  #19  
Parrot Mom
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Sorry, but the bands did nothing for me.. and the M.D.'s wouldn't give me the patch because of the side effects. I had even met people on a cruise that were having problems and they took theirs off. What I do is buy a bottle of ginger capsules (the old flat ginger ale remedy we had as kids) and take them at each meal.. or you can bring ginger tea bags or a piece of ginger candy. An M.D. who is a sailor recommended a medication in Bermuda which I swear by, Sturgeron..no side effects. There is nothing worse than being seasick...take it from one who knows. The ginger capsules can be bought in a health food store..inexpensive....it couldn't hurt and no side effects..
 
May 24th, 2002, 04:06 AM
  #20  
gail
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Often MDs won't prescribe scopolamine patch for older people because many of the contraindications are conditions more common as people age - prostate, high blood pressure, glaucoma, bladder or kidney problems. I obviously do not know your age or health problems) Also, as they cause decrease in many body fluids, constipation is a complaint by many. I have used Seabands and "think" they worked for me - but for me (and I am sure others), motion sickness has become a self-fulfilling prophecy. I once felt ill on a large docked ship!

Antivert is often prescribed - some peole become very drowsy and others not. Usually dosage can be decreased to point where it provides relief but not drowsiness. However, with most motion sickness medications, either over-the-counter or by prescription you can not drink alcohol.

As above - just mention a boat to me and I feel sick - BUT we just returned from short Bahamas cruise in fairly rough seas and I did not feel sick at all and after the first day forgot to wear the silly Sea Bands.
 

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