Trip to Banff/Jasper

Old Feb 13th, 2007, 01:17 PM
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Trip to Banff/Jasper

My husband and I are going to Banff and Jasper for a week and a half in late June. We're 30 and 31, love hiking, beautiful scenery, and great food. Here's our tentative itinerary:
1 day and night: Fly into Calgary. Stay in Calgary.
2 nights in Jasper
3 nights in Banff/ Lake Louise
2 nights in Lake O'hara
last night in Calgary
Fly home

I'm wondering if we should stay in Banff/Canmor or Lake Louise. Are most of the sights around Banff or Lake Louise? I don't really want to spend a couple of hours a day just in the car. Comments regarding the itinerary are most welcome too.
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Old Feb 13th, 2007, 03:04 PM
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Hi Wind,

I don’t quite understand what you mean by your first day when you say, "1 day and night: Fly into Calgary. Stay in Calgary." What is 1 day and night? Do you want to spend a day in Calgary? Or is that day the day on which you fly from your home to Calgary?

I am guessing that you intend that first day to be a flying day, and you do not intend it to be a sight seeing day in Calgary. If that is the case, I don’t know if it’s necessary for you to spend the night in Calgary. It depends when your plane gets into Calgary. If you land in Calgary mid afternoon, you would be able to drive to the mountains the same day. It takes about an hour to get through Canadian immigration and customs at the airport. Then it takes a couple of hours to drive from Calgary Airport to Banff townsite. If Lake Louise was going to be your destination, it would take another 45 minutes.

If your plane landed in Calgary around 6.00 p.m., you probably could still make it to the mountains that evening, owing to the long daylight hours we have in late June. However, if you got in later than 6.00 p.m., I would recommend you spend the night in Calgary, and not try to push yourselves to get to the mountains that night. For one thing, you’d be tired. Secondly, once it got dark you’d miss the beautiful mountain scenery. Thirdly, wildlife is more apt to jump out on the road in front of you at dusk or just after dark, and that’s the last thing you need.

Do you have reservations at Lake O’Hara Lodge? I’d be very surprised if you do. It’s always worth a try, of course, but I think your chances of getting in there are extremely slim. Most people book the previous fall for the following summer. If you cannot get in there to stay, you can still get there as a day tripper.

Banff and Lake Louise both have their pros and cons. The town of Banff is in a prettier setting, in my opinion, than the village of Lake Louise. Banff townsite is set in a wide valley, and when you stand in the town, you have a good view of the mountains that encircle it. Banff has over 200 restaurants, so you have a large selection of places at which to eat.

The village of Lake Louise has tall trees growing in it, and it’s in a position where it’s more closed in by the mountains. It’s hard to explain until you’ve seen it. BUT, if you put aside the location of Lake Louise Village itself, Lake Louise is more centrally located with respect to prime scenery and hiking territory than Banff townsite is. Also, while the Lake Louise area has only a handful of hotels and restaurants, most of the restaurants that it does have are very good. So, if your priorities are scenery and hiking, I would say that Lake Louise would be a better base for you than Banff.

More in next post ..........
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Old Feb 13th, 2007, 03:05 PM
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Here is an itinerary that would minimize the number of hotel changes. Your draft itinerary had you staying in 5 hotels over 9 nights. This itinerary reduces it to 3 hotels.

Day 1 – Land in Calgary, drive to Banff or Lake Louise, whichever one you have chosen as your base. This would work only if you were on a flight that landed in Calgary at 6.00 p.m. or sooner.

Otherwise you’ll have to bite the bullet and spend the night in Calgary. If you get into Calgary at night, I recommend that you stay at Four Points Sheraton Calgary West. During off peak hours it will be easy to drive from the northeast quadrant of Calgary, where the airport is located, to the Four Points Sheraton Calgary West, which is near the western city limits. Then you won’t have to drive across Calgary the following morning in rush hour traffic, and you’ll also be well placed to start your westward drive to the mountains.

Day 2 – Banff / Lake Louise : Visit Moraine Lake and the lake of Lake Louise, and do one of the lovely half day hikes in that area (Larch Valley that departs from Moraine Lake or Plain of Six Glaciers hike or Lake Agnes hike that departs from the lake of Lake Louise).

The lake of Lake Louise is 3 miles from the village of Lake Louise. Moraine Lake is 9 miles from Lake Louise.

Day 3 – Banff / Lake Louise : Catch bus to Lake O’Hara as day trippers. NOTE : You have to phone a minimum of 3 months in advance to book day trippers’ spots on the bus. You can find out the phone number if you do a Google search for Lake O’Hara. Hike in the Lake O’Hara area. You probably will have time to visit Takakkaw Falls on your way to or from Lake O’Hara.

The parking lot from which you catch the bus to Lake O’Hara is quite close to the turn off to Takakkaw Falls. The parking lot from which you catch the Lake O’Hara bus is 10 – 15 minutes’ drive from Lake Louise. The bus ride from the parking lot to Lake O’Hara Lodge is about 10 miles.

Day 4 – Visit Johnston Canyon. Walk to the Lower Falls at least. Being as young and fit as you are, you might like to walk further, to the Upper Falls, or further still, to the Ink Pots. Visit Lake Minnewanka. Ride the gondola up Sulphur Mountain just outside of Banff townsite. Stroll through Banff townsite. Consider having dinner in Banff townsite, by way of a change from Lake Louise.

The distance from Lake Louise to Banff on the TransCanada Highway is 38 miles. You can go on the Bow Valley Parkway (Hwy #1A) in one direction, and go on the TransCanada Highway (Hwy #1) in the other direction. Johnston Canyon is located just off the Bow Valley Parkway, about two thirds of the way from Lake Louise to Banff. It takes about an hour to drive the Bow Valley Parkway, because the speed limit is 60 km/hr (38 MPH). On the way back, on the faster TransCanada Highway, it will take you about 45 minutes to get from Banff to Lake Louise.

Day 5 – Catch the bus and hike Sunshine Meadows. You can find out the phone number for the bus if you do a Google search for Sunshine Meadows + Banff. The bookings for this bus are not as time sensitive as the bookings for Lake O’Hara. You don’t need to phone 3 months ahead. A couple of weeks ahead is good enough.

The point at which you meet the shuttle bus is about a half-hour drive from Lake Louise.

Day 6 – Drive the Icefields Parkway (Hwy #93) to Jasper. It nominally is a 3-hour drive but, if you stop at several scenic lookout points, it takes the better part of a day. Minimal stops include Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, the Columbia Icefields (with optional Ice Explorer ride onto the Athabasca Glacier), Sunwapta Falls and Athabasca Falls.

Days 7 & 8 – Over these couple of days, visit Maligne Canyon, Maligne Lake, ride the Jasper tramway (with the extra little hike to the top of the mountain), and visit Miette Hot Springs. If the road to Mount Edith Cavell is open, drive it.

Maligne Canyon is 7 miles from Jasper townsite. The drive from Jasper townsite to Maligne Lake is 50 – 60 minutes in one direction (again because of a speed limit of 38 MPH and also because you have a better than average chance of seeing wildlife from this road). Miette Hot Springs is about an hour’s drive from Jasper townsite.

Day 9 – Return to Lake Louise and Banff, and stop at additional places that you may have wanted to see along the Icefields Parkway but did not have time to stop at on the way up. For example, you might want to visit Mistaya Canyon. Drive on to Calgary for the night. I suggest you stay in a hotel in the northeast quadrant, near the airport. It would be possible to have dinner in Banff townsite and drive to Calgary afterwards. If you drove non-stop, it would take you about 5½ hours to get from Jasper to Calgary Airport.

Day 10 – Fly home.

More in next post ..........
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Old Feb 13th, 2007, 03:06 PM
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I have tried to give you a sense of driving times. The speed limit on the main roads in the mountain national parks is 90 km/hr (57 MPH). On the side roads to Moraine Lake, Takakkaw Falls, Maligne Lake and the like, it is 60 km/hr (38 MPH).

If you want to do justice to the Canadian Rockies, you have to do a certain amount of driving. The traffic in late June is pretty light, you drive through gorgeous scenery, and I think the driving is worth it.

However, if you don’t want to drive, then the Canadian Rockies is not the destination for you, and you should choose some other place.

Hope that helps.
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Old Feb 13th, 2007, 07:32 PM
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The whole tenor of your question makes me curious. Do you really have 2 nights reserved at Lake O'Hara Lodge? Or perhaps the Elizabeth Parker Alpine Club shelter? (I somehow don't get the idea you planned on using the campground.)

If you do NOT as of right now have reservations at Lake O'Hara Lodge, all I can say is "Rot's o ruck," and pray for a cancellation.

Also I take it that you have no plans to drive along the Icefields Parkway, which to my way of thinking is a major omission.
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Old Feb 14th, 2007, 07:59 AM
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Thank you Judy and Bob for such excellent recommendations. DH and I are studying your posts and making notes!

We do have two nights of reservation at Lake O'Hara Lodge. I called last Thursday, and they still had some rooms for late June. Of course I snatched it right away. We feel very lucky.

I spent my first two years of college at UC (Calgary), and I still keep in touch with my very good college friend. (I was an international student from Taiwan.) We'll spend the first and last day of our trip in Calgary, staying at her house and just catching up. I also want to take DH to visit UC engineering campus and student union -- you can tell that I'm nostalgic for the many fond memories of those years.

Since we're staying in Calgary the first night, I figure we'll have a whole day to get to Jasper the next day, and we'll get the longest leg of the drive out of the way. We do plan to drive along the famous Icefield Parkway, but it might be on our way back from Jasper to Lake Louise.

When I lived in Calgary, we took some day trips to Lake Louise, but we never did any in-depth travel of the region. The Canadian Rockies is a very very special place to me. So is Calgary. I'm so excited to go back and experience its beauty in a deeper way.
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Old Feb 14th, 2007, 02:14 PM
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You will love Lake O'Hara! It is my favorite place in that part of the world.

While there, I hope you have the legs to take the highline trail to Lake McArthur! It is one of my 4 favorite trails in Yoho.

My wife and I have made it out to Lake McArthur several times, but now that I am 74 it will be a bit more difficult.
In 2004 I could not get there because I had just had hip replacement surgery, but I got there in 2005!!!!

At the time you are going, Lake McArthur should still have some ice on it. We went one year in very early July, and the lake was 70% frozen over with a few major cracks starting to form. The contrast between the glare of the ice and the jet black water was startling.

If you still have some energy left for another hike, let me suggest the trail to Opabin Lake. Then take the Yukness Ledge alpine route toward Lake Oesa and descend to Lake O'Hara that way. As alpine routes go, this one is not steep until you join the main O'Hara - Oesa trail. The alpine route consists mainly of scrambling over a few rocks while following a route marked with paint on the rocks.

If you really have the legs for it, take one of the high alpine routes, like All Souls, or scale the rocks to Sleeping Poet Pool. Or continue on above Opabin Lake.

At one point on the Yukness Ledge route you have an unobstructed downward view to Lake O'Hara that is about 1,500 feet, with a clear view of all the surrounding peaks. It is one of the most awesome views in the whole of Canada.

My recommendation is to take the earliest bus you can to the lodge, head for some hiking destination, and work up and appetite. The food is fabulous!!!

Then the next day, do likewise. Your last day, do what you have energy to do.

Another excursion I highly recommend is the trail to the Ordaray Prospect. The policy on using the trail to the Ordaray Prospect varies from year to year. Check on the current policy when you get there, and learn what is required this season. One year we had to form a group with other people to make the trip. No matter, do what you need to do, but take the hike if you can.

From the prospect you will get a perspective of the whole O'Hara glacial bowl that is unavailable from other vantage points.

So if you do the circular hike around Lake O'Hara itself as a warm-up, the Yukness Ledge, the Ordary Prospect and, above all, Lake McArthur, you are in for a royal three days of the glories of Yoho.

If you are really in shape, see how fast you can make the circular trip around the Lake. The staff at O'Hara the last time I was there was having a contest to see which one of them could make the loop in the least amount of time with no broken bones. One of the girls was a collegiate gymnast and she cheated by vaulting over some of the rocks and running along a couple of logs lying by the edge of the lake, thus shortcutting the route!! (The logs were wider than the balance beam, hence no problem!!! Looked like a highway to her!) Besides she was very aerobic, light in weight and sure footed. As a result none of the obstacles bothered her. I think her time was something ungodly like 11 minutes or so. I may be wrong on that, but whatever it was, mere mortals could not do it.

If I seem a little partial to that area it is because I am. I make no pretense not to be!!!!!!!!
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Old Feb 16th, 2007, 07:36 AM
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Thank you Bob so so much for the wonderful hiking information. We plan to follow your suggestions exactly -- get there early the first day and leave late the last day, do the Lake O'Hara circular hike, the Yukness Ledge, the Ordary Prospect and Lake McArthur. Both of us are fairly fit, I do yoga and pilate every day, and DH plays basketball twice a week. We should add some cardio training just to prepare for these hikes!
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Old Feb 16th, 2007, 09:40 PM
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Keep in mind that my suggestions are my own evaluations of the available hikes. Others may well have a different point of view.

Here is hoping that you have good weather! We went there one day in late August and hiked in about 5 inches of snow. We took the Lake Oesa trail and I almost fell in the lake before I saw it!!

Some people rate the Cathedral Basin destination highly also. It is a long one, however, over 10 miles round trip.

For the amount of time you are there, I think McArthur, Opabin + Yukness, and the Ordaray Prospect will give you a first rate intro.

If you decide you want one of the other alpine routes, bear in mind that some of them have steep descents on scree slopes.

The highline route to McArthur is preferable to the low line route. If you take the lowline, you actually drop down into a hole well below lake level and then you have to climb out of it. The views on this route don't appeal to me, and you don't really avoid any steep uphill grades.

If I am going to sweat and puff, I at least want a great view while I catch my breath.

Be sure to take water with you. The Lodge will have the fixings for a fabulous lunch. We like nothing better than to put our lunch in our packs, grab out hiking poles, stuff our rain jackets in the pack (before the lunch), and prepare to spend a couple of hours gazing at the lake.

If you come in from the highline trail, you actually descend to the lake. There are several very comfortable rocks on which to sit and enjoy the views. Strange how a rock that overlooks a great view is better than one that does not!!

Again, I make my suggestions based on my own personal preferances and others may well differ.

The one trail I suggest avoiding is Big Larches. The roots of the larch trees are slippery underfoot and I recall fuming and fussing because I had difficulty keep upright.

But, a surer footed hiker might not have that problem.

At any rate, be prepared for a great time of it. The food when we were there is really very good, and don;t underestimate how much you will need for lunch. Hiking makes me hungry, and the lunch from the Lodge is usually quite good. Hunger makes it better.

If you have any food allergies or food avoidances for any reason, let the Lodge folks know. They have accommodated me nicely in the past. (I have to avoid highly spiced foods and, above all, onions.)

I hope they have talent night when you are there. Bruce lets the guys and gals go sort of nutty. He hires witty, intelligent college kids and their imaginations can take wing. I must admit that Bruce lets them air it out.
But, when it comes times to work, they get the job done. I was impressed with how smoothly everything seems to run.
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Old Feb 21st, 2007, 08:10 AM
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Thank you Bob again for your excellent comments.

Just out of curiosity, has anyone ever been to both the Canadian Rockies and the Alps? How do these two compare with each other? Scenery-wise, which one is more impressive?

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Old Feb 21st, 2007, 11:07 AM
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Old Feb 21st, 2007, 05:06 PM
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I have done the Canadian Rockies more than once and the Alps 8 of the last 9 years.

Please don't ask me to compare them in terms of one being better than the other because it is like comparing beautiful women. (Pardon the male input here, but I'm not THAT old.)

Just admire each one for what it has to offer because both have plenty.

If I had to make a comparison, I would say that the Rockies offer slightly lower altitudes, but equally great relief in terms of high to low. The Swiss Alps are more populated, hence there are more cable lifts, mountain trains, hotels etc away from the population centers.

The Alps offer more true horns, where glaciation has taken place on 3 sides, and some of the valleys are more steep and require a dramatic ascent, particularly from the Rhone Valley to the Turtmanntal and Val d'Anniviers.

The Rockies have no highway passes quite like those of the high Alps. I have yet to find anything that quite compares with the Furka, Grimsel, and Susten Passes of the Berner Oberland or the St. Bernard Pass of the Pennine Alps.

Canada has much more and varied wildlife whereas in Switzeland the high alps (pastures) are well grazed by sheep and cows in the summer. There are no bears that I know of in Switzerland, nor are there wolves and various wild felines such as lynx and bobcats. Moreover, there are no elk or moose.

The backcountry of the Rockies offers one thing that is really rare in the Swiss Alps: total solitude. I would not ever trade some of my back country excursions in Canada for anything I have yet done in the Alps.

I remember hiking to a high hanging valley off the upper Yoho River that took us up to such a remote area that we saw not one other person from the time we left the lodge until we returned to the main trail. It was so quiet up there I could hear my heart beating quite audibly. (Reassuring, I might add.)

Switzerland has many more miles of marked hiking trails, and a good collection of attended high altitude shelter facilities. Sometimes you hear the word "hut" used to describe them.
Well, that is not accurate many times because some of the shelter "huts" will hold over 100 hikers plus the staff and they are 3 story buildings! (Not exactly my idea of a hut.)

Suffice it to say that the Canadian Rockies and the Swiss Alps are very different and, to use a French term,
Vive la difference.

I would not want to have missed either, and I will return to both.

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Old Feb 22nd, 2007, 10:43 AM
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I would like to add a bit to the above comments. I don't want to start comparisons as I said, but when one looks at unique features, I will go this far:
Lake Louise, Moraine Lake, Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, and Lake O'Hara are beautiful as are the smaller, higher alpine lakes such as Oesa, Opabin, and McArthur.

Also if we are speaking geologically of the Canadian Rockies, the American Glacier National Park and Waterton National Park must be included because they were formed at the same geologic time and by the same geologic thrust faulting event that produced the ridges around Banff, Lake Louise, and all the way to Jasper and beyond.

So the whole collection of alpine lakes in the Canadian Rockies, taken as a whole, offers a high level of scenic reward.

I try to avoid comparing the two mountain areas like they were two football teams because I get no reward from doing it. I don't see them as being in competition. I visit both, enjoy both, and hope to return as often as I can before age shuts me down.
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Old Feb 22nd, 2007, 01:39 PM
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Bob, thanks for answering such a 'loaded' question. You don't need to be so PC... Maybe I should give some history: DH and I spent three weeks in French Polynesia (commonly known as Tahiti) for our honeymoon. Needless to say, we had the time of our lives. Since then we've traveled to a few other tropical islands such as Hawaii, the Caribbeans, and Santorini, Greece. And guess what? Our Tahiti honeymoon experience has spoiled us so bad and made all the other beautiful island destinations look kind of subpar... We still enjoy them, but we couldn't help comparing them with Tahiti and feel... "we'd rather have gone to Tahiti"!

Similarly, since I have visited the Canadian Rockies as a teenager, our trips to the other national parks (Yosemite, Rockies in Colorado, and Yellowstone) brought the same kind of sentiment--"not as magnificent as the Canadian Rockies". All of my American friends who have been to the Canadian Rockies agree with me, but they're 'lucky' to have gone to these other mountains BEFORE they finally made it to the Canadian Rockies. I guess it's not FAIR to compare, but when you're spending quite a bit of time and money to travel, you want to go to the best one, don't you?
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Old Feb 22nd, 2007, 04:35 PM
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Well, I will go this far. Last summer we were in Zermatt on a clear day. We tossed a coin and took the cable lifts to the Klein Matterhorn viewpoint at about 12,000 feet. The view was staggering in its beauty.

I don't think anything I have seen anywhere quite outdoes it, but there are plenty of runner ups. Some are in Switzerland and some are in the Canadian Rockies.

The grandest view I have yet found in the Canadian Rockies is from the highpoint of the Whaleback Trail just before the trail plunges breakneck downhill to the Little Yoho River.
That scene, too, is magnificent.

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Old Feb 26th, 2007, 11:13 AM
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Bob,

Alright, you convinced me, I guess we'll have to visit the Alps some day.

I have yet another couple of questions regarding hiking in Lake O'hara. Does the lodge provide all the detailed hiking trail information or should I purchase some hiking books beforehand? Also, does the lodge provide bottled water? DH and I once stayed at this remote resort in Rangiora (Tahiti). There were only five bungalows on the island, and it's an hour of boat ride away from the main island. There's no drinking water and no electricity. We ended up getting a scary bill for bottled water over 4 days. Just gotta get better prepared next time.
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Old Feb 26th, 2007, 05:43 PM
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What do you need bottled water for? Lodge water is about as free of adulterants as you can get. Take a canteen or your own Nalgene bottle and fill it from the tap.

Hiking books? The Lodge can give directions. The La Relais shelter, which is one of 3 bus stops, has area maps for sale.

The trails are well marked with metal guide posts. However, heavy snow, particularly avalanches can knock the signs askew or sweep them away. Hopefully the warden service will replace them.

Actually, the highline route to McArthur is easy to follow. Go to the Elizabeth Parker alpine hut close to La Relais, turn left, ascend the moraine to Schaeffer Lake, cross the outlet stream, and turn right and climb the side of the mountain.

Hiking boots? Yes you need them.
Mine are well seasoned to the extent that some of the moulded ankle collar is breaking down. But for those trails, you need good lug soles and I think ankle protection is in order as well.

The trails to and from Opabin are steep, and the Yukness Ledge is rocks --a marked route over a talus slope.

The descent from Oesa is also steep, with ample opportunities to twist an ankle.

As for a comparison with Switzerland: it is like comparing the best quality pinot chardonay with the best pinot noir.

Which is the better? You might have to drink 20 bottles of each to decide.

Let me put it this way. The first time we went to O'Hara, there was a family on the bus making the trip. The father was about 60. The purpose of the trip was highly personal: They were going to Lake McArthur and scatter their sons ashes along the high point of the trail all the way to the lake itself.

I cannot think of a better place. Their intent was to return each year in honor of their son who loved that particular trail. When I think of the beauty of the area, I can not imagine a more fitting tribute.
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