Help visiting BC

Mar 16th, 2000, 01:54 PM
  #1  
Keith Bath
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Help visiting BC

Hi, My wife and I are visiting Canada end April early May, we have planned to fly to Vancouver from the UK around the 26th April and stay for 14 days with a rental car, we thought of seeing the sights of Vancouver for a couple of days and then travelling around to other places, can anyone suggest a good sight seeing itinery, we are particularly concerned about what the weather will be like and we would like to see a combination of the rockies, the valleys and the history of BC, totem poles, museums, wildlife etc. We have no firm plans on where we want to go, but thought of driving to the mountains through the Okanagan valley region maybe up to Banff and back to Vancouver, places to stay and cost would be of interest around $100 to $150CD a night. If anyone can be of assistance we would be most grateful. Thanks Keith & Helen
 
Mar 16th, 2000, 06:17 PM
  #2  
April
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Check out some of Bob Brown's postings on previous subjects on this forum such as: "Banff to Vancouver", "Calgary to Vancouver in mid-April to May" and "Travel Advice for a journey from British Columbia to Toronto".
 
Mar 16th, 2000, 06:27 PM
  #3  
sheri
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I would urge you to include Vancouver Island on your itinerary, particularly Victoria (esp. for the totems and museum there, which focuses on the history of the province), and Tofino, on the far west coast of the island. I also love the scenery on the Sunshine Coast, north of Vancouver. You can make a big circle from the mainland, over to Vancouver Island, then cross from Comox to Powell River and work your way back down to Vancouver (or vice versa).
 
Mar 16th, 2000, 06:57 PM
  #4  
Randy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Weather can be unpedictable at this time of year in the interior of B.C. Vancouver is usually nice at this time of year, but even this isn't for sure. Granville island is nice, with live theatre, great restaurants, farmers market, artists brewery. If the weather is nice, head across the lions gate bridge, to North Vancouver through Horseshoe Bay and up to Whistler (Called the sea to sky highway). Proceed up to Lillooet then to Merritt, via Lytton junction and Spences Bridge. Take the Coquihalla connector to Summerland and then Kelowna. Kelowna is the biggest town(only real city) in the okanogan. Go east to Vernon. Now for a little wilderness adventure. Procceed east through Lumby and cross the south arrow lake(on your first inland free ferry) to Nakusp. Here you will find nice b&bs or small motels, as well as a nice hotspring. Go from here southeast to New Denver and then over the mountain to Kaslo. Here you will find a wonderful b&b/restaurant called the Rosewood. About 10 miles south is a very unique hot spring called Ainsworth Hot Springs. This hot spring has its hot pool inside the mountain, and a glacier plunge pool right beside it. At this time of year rates should be about $125 per night including hot pool use. (meals pricey at Ainsworth Hot Spring Hotel, recommend rosewood in Kaslo) From here go south to Balfour, take a 40 minute fre ferry ride across Kootenay Lake, go south to Creston east to Cranbrook, north to Radium(and a nice hot spring pool). Enter Yoho National park, and the Rocky Mountains. Head east into Banff National Park and then to the town of Banff. Remember it's still early spring in the Rockies, and wildlife might be scarce. There could still be snow. For a quicker return to Vancouver, go west on Highway One (trans-Canada highway) to Revelstoke, Sicamous(and Dutchman's Dairy, the greatest ice cream on the planet) then to Salmon Arm, Kamloops. NOw take the Coquihalla to Hope and back to Vancouver. Sounds simple? Remember this trip covers 1500 Km. Weather can be unpredictable. In the Kootenay mountains there could be snow, in the rockies the nights will be cold. Bring warm clothes. Look at a few maps, think over some possible routes, and repost. I live in Alberta, and go to the Okanogan via Banff or Jasper National Parks every summer, so I should be able to answer a lot of your questions(except where to find totem poles, I've never seen one)
Rendy
 
Mar 17th, 2000, 07:13 AM
  #5  
April
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Sheri is right. One of the easiest way to see totems is in Victoria at the Royal BC Museum.

Now if you don't mind a tour of internet sites... for information on the museum go to
http://rbcm1.rbcm.gov.bc.ca/index_vi.html
This museum is interesting and gives a good overview of British Columbia's history. Visit an old west town, old ship, mining operation, cannery, walk through the forest and by the coast, see the wildlife, etc. Even though it's in a museum the "big house" has a powerful but peaceful quality. People seem to whisper in it. There are, or at least there used to be, very old totem poles inside the museum which I believe - correct me if I'm wrong - may have come from the Queen Charlotte Islands, as well as a good display of masks.

The museum has a gift shop and a cafe. Next door is Thunderbird Park where you may see some carving in progress.
http://www.parl-bldgs.gov.bc.ca/gall...ct/thunder.htm

At http://www.nativeonline.com/mungo.html on the artist Mungo Martin you will also see mention of Bill Reid. Be sure to see his large sculpture in the Vancouver airport.
http://www.yvr.ca/guides/artondisplay/haidagwaii.htm

A favourite stop of mine on the way through Hope, BC is at the Othello Quintette Tunnels, about a 10 minute drive out of the town. Walking on the old rail bed and through the tunnels, with giant slabs of rock above and a stunning drop into the gorge below will give you an up-close view of the difficult terrain the engineers had to deal with. Itís a short, easy walk from the parking lot.
http://www.hopechamber.bc.ca/tunnels.htm

Once in BC, stop in at a tourist office and ask for the latest BC Accommodations Guide. This gives descriptions and prices for hotels, motels, resorts, b&b's, etc., all over the province.

You should see wildlife on your trip, especially through the Rockies - bear, mountain goats and sheep, elk, maybe moose. Bald eagles are quite common on the west coast these days.
 
Mar 17th, 2000, 10:02 PM
  #6  
Tom Ryan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Keith,

Here's a little advice, check out the Tourism British Columbia web-site www.hellobc.com

Good luck......

Tom

 
Mar 18th, 2000, 07:10 AM
  #7  
Bob Brown
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I would like to second the motion about the BC Museum in Victoria. It is very well done, but it is not so large as to be overpowering. It presents well the history of the province. And don't forget those wonderful gardens north of town. This web site shows some of the beauty: http://www.butchartgardens.com/
I also enjoyed the ferry ride over from Tsawwassen (sp??).
 
Mar 18th, 2000, 11:57 AM
  #8  
April
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Spelling of Tsawwassen is correct, Bob. And for anybody wondering, according to the Geographic Data branch, it is pronounced "sa WOSS-en"...but many people pronounce the T anyway.
 
Mar 18th, 2000, 03:31 PM
  #9  
Keith Bath
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi All
Many thanks for all your replies, I was really surprised by the response, I have already checked out some of the web sites mentioned, and was bewildered by the amount of information and could not make any firm decisions, hence the reason for my initial post. I think you can't beat a bit a local knowledge from someone who lives in the area or has travelled there, I'm sure my wife and I will really enjoy our vacation thanks to the input from you all.
Regards Keith & Helen
 
Mar 20th, 2000, 02:25 PM
  #10  
jackie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Keith & Helen,

Am I too late? I have to concur with Sheri - don't miss Vancouver Island, especially Pacific Rim National Park. This is probably one of the top 3 most scenic places in Canada. Have a great trip!
Jackie
 
Mar 21st, 2000, 02:50 PM
  #11  
Keith Bath
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
No you are not to late Jackie, thanks for your comments, everything has been noted and will surely make our trip more memorable, I will check regularly for any further comments before we travel, just in case anyone remembers anything else that will help.
Regards Keith & Helen
 
Mar 21st, 2000, 04:07 PM
  #12  
Bob Brown
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Well, I can't agree on the Pacific Rim bit. It does not in my book exceed the sights of the Icefields Parkway, Lake Louise, Moraine Lake, looking down on Lake O'Hara from either the Ordary Prospect or the rough trail from Opabin Lake over to Lake Oesa, or the views over the mountains in Glacier National Park.
Or how about the view south from the Prince of Wales Hotel in Waterton!!
And of course there is the incomparable view of the President Range and south out over the Yoho Valley all the way to Mount Victoria from the highpoint of the Whaleback Trail in Yoho. In Canada, that view is almost unparalleled outside of Alaska.
It rivals some of those in Switzerland.
 
Mar 22nd, 2000, 09:46 PM
  #13  
April
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I think nothing in Canada exceeds the sights of the Icefields Parkway, etc., in the Rockies. If I was visiting, I would spend most of my time in that area. However, for the epitome of west coast views (which are easily accessible), Pacific Rim would probably be it. Some friends from England were quite intrigued with our seaweed! It is a bit out of the way though and you only have two weeks. You could take the ferry to or from Nanaimo to cut down on the driving time if you were interested in including this in your travels.
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:37 AM.