Total solar eclipse Cairns Nov. 2012

Jul 24th, 2009, 03:22 PM
  #21  
 
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Actually Kriol I have to disagree with you despite your support on another thread. In November the rain is thunder storm related and often, but not always, comes from the north west. Areas to the west of the Atherton Tablelands often get storm rain before we do. The storm cell lines are usually developing in the afternoon.

Ralph, I suggest that you base ytourself somewhere on the Atherton Tablelands and be ready to move if necessary.
Saltuarius is offline  
Jul 25th, 2009, 06:27 AM
  #22  
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jossi....thanks very much for that useful link and for starting up a reasonable conversation on the topic. I'm planning to be there, though 2012 is still a long way off.
RalphR is offline  
Jul 29th, 2009, 06:40 PM
  #23  
 
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Oh come on now Ralph, I thought we had had a reasonable conversation. We just chose to disagree.
Yes 2012 is a long way off but don't forget to check what the weather is like on the morning of the 13th November in 2009, 2010 & 2011 so that your decision is more probability based.
You want to get it right now.
And take Saltuarius' idea & tackle it like one of those Storm Chaser's.
Follow the sun Ralph, follow the sun!
Webbo is offline  
Jul 30th, 2009, 08:26 PM
  #24  
 
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Webbo,

Not one of your most "thoughtful" or helpful responses.

Doesn't it stand to reason that someone with "an avid interest in astronomy" would know how to view an eclipse. I learnt how when I was five years old. It's not rocket science.

Further, Webbo, If you accept that RalphR knows they're dangerous then this acceptance of yours also acknowledges the 'how to' thing.

RalphR,

There was a total eclipse in the North Pacific on Asian side on the twenty second July (few weeks ago) it lasted several minutes. A mate of mine flew to Japan for several minutes of mid morning blackout.
You must have missed out while dialogueing with Webbo.

nevets
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Jul 30th, 2009, 08:47 PM
  #25  
 
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Hi Ralph

Here is a link to article. Maybe it will become a big event. Does sound like they will plan an event on the Tablelands.
http://www.cairns.com.au/article/200...ness-news.html
Kriol is offline  
Aug 2nd, 2009, 08:35 AM
  #26  
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nevets, Kriol...thanks! I was aware of the 22 July Asia eclipse, which was a very good one, longer duration than the one in NQ in 11/2012. Found out about it at the same I found out about the Cairns eclipse..figured I rather go to Australia instead, and didnt have much time to plan anyway.
RalphR is offline  
Aug 2nd, 2009, 06:06 PM
  #27  
 
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Nevets. Nice of you to join us.
And I am pleased that your early education was fruitful.
You would have noticed I hope, that the discussion was more about the probability of weather conditions on the morning of the 13th November 2012.
Why not throw your two bobs worth in about the real subject instead of sniping about other matters.
Come on, can't wait to hear from you.
Webbo is offline  
Aug 2nd, 2009, 10:07 PM
  #28  
 
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Webbo,

True, True.

There was however, the tangent of 'how to' which I picked up on. I was merely leaning toward some cyber support for RalphR.

RalphR,

The projected sunrise for Cairns on 13 November 2012 is a little before 5 am.

Using the Palm Cove (Cairns area) forecast for the next several days the probability of a sunny day is somewhat discouraging; Showers, Clearing Showers, Mostly cloudy, Mostly Sunny, Clearing Shower, Mostly Sunny, Mostly Sunny. It is however, a nice sunny day here in Sydney.

For a more in-depth forecast, for three and a half years in the future, we may have to consult a more mystical source. Perhaps someone who wears multi coloured light clothing and claims to see things emenating from crystal snow cones.

Can I suggest a more appropriate viewing platform for the eclipse. Raoul Island in the Pacific Ocean. It's about 1100 km's N N/E of New Zealand. According to NASA the apogee of the celestial event is in this vicinity.

Raoul Island is basically only a weather station and yatch's going past can radio in for a visit visa.

nevets
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Aug 3rd, 2009, 10:19 PM
  #29  
 
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RalphR,

Sounds like nevets is giving you good information regarding alternative viewing sights.

As a relatively experienced eclipse viewer (8 total solar eclipses), I thought I might add information about safely viewing the eclipse.

During the partial phases of a total solar eclipse you should not view the sun without protection. You can use the projection method as you and others mention above. Or, you can purchase solar filters for your telescope. Safe eye protection is specially made eclipse viewing glasses or #14 welders glass. However, during totality (after 2nd contact or the 1st diamond ring) you want to view the eclipse with your naked eye or without any type of solar filter on your telescope. After totality you must again use protective filters on your telescope and while viewing with you eyes.

A great book for the novice eclipse viewer is Eclipse! The What, Where, When, Why & How Guide to Watching Solar & Lunar Eclipses by Philip S. Harrington.

View the November 2012 eclipse path at this NASA link: http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogl...13Tgoogle.html

As the date gets closer you can check these travel websites to see what location they have chosen to view the eclipse. Both partner with skilled meterologists to evaluate the best weather prospects at various locations along the path of totality.

http://www.travelquesttours.com/ (7 of my 8 eclipse tours were with this group.)

http://www.wildernesstravel.com/trip...hiti-2010-tour

Good luck on you eclipse viewing goal.

ElipseChaser
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Aug 4th, 2009, 04:12 PM
  #30  
 
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RalphR, apparently accommodation bookings in Cairns over the eclipse period are picking up already so don't leave it too long before confirming your accommodation.
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Aug 4th, 2009, 09:18 PM
  #31  
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"EclipseChaser"...thank you...like that NASA website!

Ralph
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Sep 8th, 2009, 08:12 PM
  #32  
 
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Cairns City will not be the best place to view the eclipse as the sun will rise behind a headland, try the northern beaches or nearer Port Douglas, more info http://www.visitcairns.com.au/cairns_eclipse_2012.htm
marty_yates is offline  
Oct 26th, 2009, 03:19 AM
  #33  
 
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Hi guys - please note that the date of Nov 13th is not Oz time but universal time. So the eclipse is on Nov 14th starting jusr after dawn Cairns/Port Douglas time. Regards
jeffbee is offline  
Oct 26th, 2009, 03:56 PM
  #34  
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Thanks Jeff...key information!

Ralph
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Oct 28th, 2009, 12:40 AM
  #35  
 
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No probs - I use an astronomy software program called Cybersky4 to check what's going on up there. You can download it for free at www.cybersky.com - I've been using a trial version for a few months and now have the full version. Check it out, it's really good.
jeffbee is offline  
Dec 14th, 2009, 04:13 PM
  #36  
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Less than 2 years to go!
RalphR is offline  
Jan 2nd, 2010, 03:10 AM
  #37  
 
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Hi guys - happy new year to all!
Need some info : I'm off from the UK, to sunny - and hot - Melbourne in mid february. Can any of you astronomy fans give me a few things to look out for in the southern skies?
Will I be able to see the magellanic clouds? Will I need binos? Is the southern cross easy to see and find? Anything else I should look out for?
Thanks in anticipation.
jeffbee is offline  
Jan 2nd, 2010, 10:26 AM
  #38  
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Jeff....obvious suggestion is to get well out of the city for a good look at the Southern Sky - you won't be able to see the Magellanic Clouds otherwise, as they are pretty diffuse, similar to the Milky Way. Binoculars not needed. The Southern Cross is easy to see and find, though it will be not far off the southern horizon at that time of year. It lies within the Milky Way - with a really clear, dark sky, you should be able to see the Coal Sack, a dark area of interstellar dust to one side of the Southern Cross. Constellations that we associate with winter in the Northern Hemisphere - Taurus, Orion, Gemini, Canis (Sirius) will be high in the sky.

Have fun. The Southern Sky is truly a thing of wonder on a clear, moonless, non-light polluted night.

Happy New Year!

Ralph
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Jan 2nd, 2010, 04:26 PM
  #39  
 
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Jeff,
Happy New Year to you too.

This site is useful for not only star maps but for satellite passes.
http://www.heavens-above.com
Saltuarius is offline  
Jan 3rd, 2010, 06:01 AM
  #40  
 
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Thanks Ralph & Saltuarius. A few good pointers for me. I'll let you know how I get on - cheers.
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