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Is Sydney Australia really that interesting? (It is 20 hours away!)

Is Sydney Australia really that interesting? (It is 20 hours away!)

Dec 24th, 2002, 06:25 AM
  #1  
Bruce
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Is Sydney Australia really that interesting? (It is 20 hours away!)

Every time the media shows Sydney Australia they show the Waterfront cultural center. I get the impression that it is the only scenic or interesting place in the area.

Though everyone raves and raves about Sydney? Why? Is it worth the long trip when there are so many similar places close by?
 
Dec 24th, 2002, 09:30 AM
  #2  
ALF
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I think Sydney is a beautifu,wonderful, incredibly diverse cosmopolitan city. It is one of my favorites, but I certainly would not travel very far just to see the city. Ideally it would be part of a larger trip to Australia.
 
Dec 24th, 2002, 11:07 AM
  #3  
liz
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I don't know where you are Bruce but there is NO city near you that is like Sydney.
Presumably you are on the eastern seaboard of the USA if you are 20 hours away ( actually that should only be 18 anyway). Australia is a vibrant and different culture from your own with perhaps the only similiarity being that we speak English ( in a fashion, that is). Perhaps if I said that NY is much more than the Empire State building, New Orleans more than Bourbong Street and LA more than Hollywood you may get the drift.
But as they say in one of our ads " if you never, never go, you will never, never know" and believe me when I tell you that it would be your loss!!!
 
Dec 24th, 2002, 11:55 AM
  #4  
Nancy
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I always saw Sydney as a warm Vancouver Canada. Alot closer to the orginal poster Bruce.
 
Dec 24th, 2002, 02:16 PM
  #5  
Mina
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I was going to say it reminds me of Vancouver too, but Nancy beat me to it.

I loved Sydney, but agree with Alf. Having been there, I would not fly 15 hours again just to go to Sydney.

But I would fly again to go to Australia. It's an amazing country, and Sydney's just a bit of it. Liz says it well when she makes her NY/LA/NO analogy. To get the jibe and vibe of a place, you have to venture past the tourist spots. I didn't do that enough when I was in Sydney...next time I'd do it better.
 
Dec 24th, 2002, 11:37 PM
  #6  
jt
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Sydney is to me the ultimate english speaking destination, the h bomb of the anglo tourism world. I refer to Sydney's whole package of parks, harbor communities, and daytrips - a perfect balance of urban and natural charms. After you've sampled London, NYC, SFO, and Vancouver... SYD is the place that will call you back the strongest.

Some folks can't appreciate this, and Sydney isn't for them. I suspect it's because they approach it in naive stereotypical ways, and don't study up. Most 1 page summaries of the area list the dullest things - get more in depth and discover magic in unexpected realms. Get beyond Kings Cross/Rocks.
 
Dec 25th, 2002, 12:42 AM
  #7  
trudy
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I originally lived in Vancouver and see absolutely no similarity with Sydney. People live in and around the harbour which is a buzzing vibrant place - Van's harbor is as dull as dishwater in comparison. Van has no beaches, Van has no Circular Quay area, Van has no Darling Harbor or Opera House. Van does have a wreck of an area which once was the Trade Centre, oh yes and Van has a beautiful park ( Stanley) but that is about it. Then of course there is Vancouver's dreadful climate. You talk about Melbourne!!!! If you don't like Vancouver's climate try living there for 12 months.
No for me Sydney was *IT* The place that I would most rather be at any given time. I love Australia and all it has to offer and Sydney is only the beginning of a wonderful experience, a beautiful doorway if you like.
I WANT TO GO BACKKKKKKKKKK
 
Dec 25th, 2002, 02:18 AM
  #8  
Debbie
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Hello,
I absolutely adored my time in Sydney and the other parts of Australia that I visited. IMO, Sydney and Australia lived up to its hype as being a wonderful tourist destination. But what probably made me fall in love most is the incredible number of warm, friendly people. I'm now in the process of looking to teach in Australa for a year. Yes, I liked it that much!

In regard to Sydney and its surrounds: Without a doubt, the harbor is one of Sydney's most special features but as Alf said, there's more to the area than just it's huge, gorgeous waterfront.

The country as a whole has so much diversity, yet it's really like no other place I've ever been. Yes, it's far and the flight isn't cheap so as Mina said, make Sydney one part of a trip to Australia...

Have a great time!
Debbie

PS Take a good book and a little sleeping pill when you get on the plane and 14 hrs will go by like *that*!



 
Dec 25th, 2002, 06:12 AM
  #9  
Brad
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Bruce:
If you depend on the media to chart your travel plans, my friend, you're not the sophisticated traveller you think you are.

Surely you must realize that a cosmopolitan city of over 5 million population has other attractions to offer. Not to mention a culture that is to be appreciated.

I am just a tad surprised that others have tried to convince you to go. As for me, my advice to you is to stay home.
 
Dec 25th, 2002, 09:16 AM
  #10  
LN
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I'm also on the east coast Bruce and actually the trip to Sydney and all other parts of Australia and New Zealand really didn't bother me. Took some good books along, added a Tylenol PM when needed and had a nice rest. We also stayed in LA for two days and enjoyed the sights there.

Sydney has a truly magnificient waterfront and they capitalize on it. Who can blame them - not me - I live on the Chesapeake Bay and no one around here has done what those Aussies have done. I think New York City could possibly pull off something as grand as they have but on today's dollar - it would cost too much!!

We used the ferries as our means of getting around a lot of Sydney and on those ferries we met the nicest, friendliest people (but then again we met so many nice, friendly people all over Australia)

We hope to return in March of 04 and then spend three months touring the country. I'd hope to visit Perth and Darwin and also spend a month in Sydney visiting the surrounding areas. Again, I will seek the needed advice from this great group of people. So thanks for our past trip and please help with my future trip. In the meantime have a blessed Christmas and holiday.
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 04:30 AM
  #11  
Jerry
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I found Sydney similar to San Francisco. LOts of the same types of trees, a waterfront, lots of culture, an active street life and lots of people from Asia. San Francisco is 3 hours away from Chicago by air, and Sydney is 17 hours. I would go with San Francisco!
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 10:09 AM
  #12  
shannon
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My husband made several observations and comments that compared Sydney to San Fran....however I would spend the 20 hrs on the plane and go to Sydney.

I was told from the beginning that I was going to Australia for my honeymoon. I had no choice in the matter.

It wasn't the romantic European destination I pictured in my mind growing up.

BUT Sydney and Australia in general was sooo much more than I could have ever imagined. I would move there in a heartbeat.

Words cannot describe the cool breeze and no humidity of a 70 degree sunny October day walking around the Quay. The old and new buildings. The water in the harbor, the boats, the different ethnic groups all walking around...the street entertainers...

The wildlife in itself is incredible. The beaches. The mountains.

Sydney just felt comfortable. You could do everything and do nothing and still have a good time. I never felt out of place. It was friendly. Helpful.

We spent 7 nights and 5 days of our 14 day honeymoon in Sydney. There were sooo many things we didn't do. The other 2 days were spent on day trips to Canberra and Blue Mtns.

It is just a feeling.

Sitting on the front of the ferry and heading towards Sydney from Manly Beach....watching the city get closer and closer.... The rocky cliffs and the pretty green water crashing up against them as you watch daring boys climbing alongside to reach the perfect fishing spot....

WE absolutely loved Tasmania. While I don't think I could live there as a younger adult... I think I could retire there. It was soooo beautiful too and completely different from Sydney.

I don't think I read anything that gave me the right impression of any of the places we visited. Pictures didn't do anything justice.

I can still vividly remember my rainy walk thru the Mt Field Ntl Forest on a cool spring day. I didn't even mind getting wet or being slightly cold. It was soo lush and green. We felt like we were the only ones around and a lot of times we were--with the exception of the wild wallabies.

There may be places here in States you haven't been too or seen and if you feel that is more important then by all means....stay here.

But if you feel the need to see/feel/do something so special and different--go to Sydney. See Australia. I never felt unsafe walking around late at night even on darkened alleys. It was easy to get around. Doesn't mean you should run around announcing you are a tourist and have lots of money either but it felt safer than NY or reports I hear from Europe with pickpockets etc...

In my opinion it is always worth it to travel to foreign lands. It will either make you appreciate what you have or wish you could be somewhere else. BUT you always learn. Grow.


 
Dec 26th, 2002, 10:54 AM
  #13  
Mina
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Here's something that makes me think that Sydney is different. Maybe Alan or someone can correct me if I'm wrong, because to this day, I am confused as to what I saw...

I was sitting at the end of the rocks area (by the Hyatt). The Opera house had a warm glow, and it was almost night...the sky was dark purple. It was quite serene.

I was looking up at the sky and saw silouettes of birds flying overhead and sighed contentedly. Until I looked more carefully and noticed they didn't fly like birds. I couldn't tell because the sky was so dark, but they looked like BATS!

Now, if they were bats, that would be a first. I've never just kicked back in a major metropolis and had bats fly over my head. Can anyone tell me if I was hallucinating? Maybe they were drunk seagulls? I don't think bats are all that uncommon, but it did throw me off.
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 11:33 AM
  #14  
Lee
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Mina, they were bats alright! Huge ones sometimes called flying foxes I believe.

If you do the Bridge Climb at dusk, you wear a helpmet and they tell you to watch out for "debris" falling from them as they swarm around eating bugs that congregate above the lights from the Bridge.

It is a relaxing and amazing site from the rooftop pool of many area hotels in the Rocks. We even got them on videotape to show everyone at home.

Sydney is the only city I've ever returned from and said "I'd like to live there for a year or two". It is just amazing. Safe, clean, friendly and full of life.
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 12:36 PM
  #15  
Mina
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Thanks Lee! Good to know I didn't have too much to drink and "see" things.
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 02:19 PM
  #16  
LN
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Shannon

You described Sydney in such a moving way. I found myself revisiting all those marvelous places again. Europe is beautiful and very, very old but Australia does have a uniqueness and I'm glad to have touched it.
 
Dec 26th, 2002, 05:27 PM
  #17  
Melodie
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Shannon,

you should quit your job and apply for one with the tourism bureau! Great description, worthy of Bill Bryson!

I've been to Vancouver, but I'd liken Sydney to San Francisco. The cities have alot in common. We have our bridge, they have theirs; we've got a Bay, Sydney has a Harbour; they have a wild and crazy waterfront history and so does SF; both are great walking cities, which is always a plus with me in any city! Both have outlying neighborhoods that are interesting to explore (like Chinatown) And by the same token, you can experience a variety of options just outside of the city; only an hour or two (or less, depending on what you're looking to do).

Melodie
Certified Aussie Specialist
 
Dec 27th, 2002, 07:40 AM
  #18  
Brenda
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Shannon,

I have goose bumps on top of goose bumps, just reading your descriptions helped me to re-live my magical trip to OZ this past August. I can't wait to do it again. We are from Miami, FL, nothing we have here can begin to compare to Sydney and Australia, in my opinion.
 
Dec 27th, 2002, 12:07 PM
  #19  
shannon
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I know I made it harder on myself....

now IF I can only go back to school, get a medical degree and be qualified to work in Aussie....that would work out just fine!!!!! Only 3 1/2 years to go....

I look at my honeymoon pictures and they just don't even do it justice.

The colors aren't as vibrant. The moment isn't captured as strongly as I remember it.

I can't even begin to tell people why they should go--except to tell them--JUST GO and see for yourself. Find the time and GO

 
Dec 27th, 2002, 12:35 PM
  #20  
jt
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How can Jerry possibly equate SFO with SYD? One has chilly, repellant beach life, while the other epitomizes warm, inviting beach fun. One exudes wary or cynical attitudes while the other is optimistic and congenial.

One has you gazing at an inert harbor view, the other has you constantly criss-crossing in a celebration of life on the water and indulging in the fantastic harborside communities.

One is struggling to fend off crime and dirt and to live up to it's past cultural reputation, while the other is blossoming from a dull past to ever higher levels in terms of gastronomy, public transport, etc, etc.

There was news recently of tourists who accidentally arranged travel online to Sydney, Nova Scotia rather than in Oz;
was that Jerry, perhaps?
 

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