XI'AN

Old Jun 20th, 2001, 05:51 PM
  #1  
John D. Roberts
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XI'AN

In the "FODOR'S" travel guide it list that photos are strictly forbidden at the Teracotta Statue Museum. This is not really true, yes there are signs that say no photos but everybody disobeys these signs and you need sunglasses with amount of flashes going off. Just a comment!!
 
Old Jun 21st, 2001, 03:51 PM
  #2  
Fritz
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That's certainly the way it was at the end of May when we visited. My wife disuaded me from trying to pose one of the smiling guards next to the "no photos" sign. I got a lot of great pictures with my digital camera, but I kept the flash off.

Somebody who had visited a couple of years ago told me that at that time they were strictly enforcing the rules. I guess the best advice is to evaluate the situation once you get inside.

Fritz
 
Old Jun 22nd, 2001, 08:16 AM
  #3  
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Just a comment: everyone on this thread and similar threads is concerned about the wrong thing. Its not whether you can ingnore the signs but whether you are contributing to the degradation of the archeological find. Air and light is a major cause of damage. Millions of people snapping pictures over the years will start to damage the statues. As does millions of people breathing on them for this reason many archeological sites are now closed to visitors e.g. the prehistoric caves in Lasceaux. You can't help breathing on them but you can help by buying a post card instead of exposing them to your flash.
 
Old Jun 22nd, 2001, 11:10 AM
  #4  
xxx
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I agree with the previous poster. Why is everyone so proud of ignoring the rules and adding to the deterioration of this amazing sight? I visited the warriors a few years ago and was actually quite happy that flashes weren't going off everywhere. Please obey the rules and allow these warriors to remain in tact and accessible to our future generations.
 
Old Jun 22nd, 2001, 12:58 PM
  #5  
Fritz
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Even better, stay home and check out a book on the Terracotta Warriors from your local library. It will be more accurate than the guide, and the pictures will have been taken from closer than you can possibly get.

And best of all, you won't be polluting the site by your presence.
 
Old Jun 23rd, 2001, 02:37 PM
  #6  
Cindy
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I took pictures of the Terracotta Warriors and used 800 speed film. You don't need the flash at that speed. Pictures were great. Guards didn't care as long as your flash was not going off. Our guide said it is fine to video tape also and I did.
 
Old Jun 25th, 2001, 09:14 AM
  #7  
Why?
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Why are people proud of themselves for breaking the rules and potentially destroying one of the most impressive finds on this earth? Would it have been as much fun to take the photos if you had been allowed to, or was it more the thrill of the challenge? My god, there's a hundred stands right outside that sell books and postcards, can't people live with a professional photo of the warriors as opposed to their destruction?

Fritz, your grandchildren will have to stay at home and look at photos of these warriors if people like you continue to go and break the rules. Travelers need to learn to obey the requests of other countries. I know I'd be pretty upset if foreign visitors were coming over to the U.S. and disobeying our rules and potentially destroying some of our national treasures.

On your next travel, please think twice before you act.

 
Old Jun 25th, 2001, 08:03 PM
  #8  
MoreTips
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I have another tip: Although most museums have signs saying not to touch the paintings, I have found that frequently there is not a guard immediatly nearby. There is nothing like running your fingers across the bumps and textures of a real Van Gogh. If you're really lucky, sometimes you can even scrape a bit of paint off. Now THAT'S something you can't get in a postcard!!
 
Old Jun 26th, 2001, 05:07 AM
  #9  
Cindyo4124
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To WHY, I think you don't read the whole comment. If you don't use a flash, how is it going to ruin??? I didn't see one flash.... I went with a Chinese tour guide who give tours each and every day at the museum. She said NO FLASH.. You need to take a pill and calm down.
 
Old Jun 28th, 2001, 07:53 PM
  #10  
Nancy Sprig
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We took pictures with no flash as well. I don't think we did any harm. And you're right that some people should "take a pill" and settle down.
 
Old Jun 29th, 2001, 03:06 PM
  #11  
Fritz
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The People's Republic of China is not a rich country, especially on a per capita basis. Tourism is one of the ways in which they are raising the funds needed to excavate, document, stabilize and exhibit the wonders surrounding the (as yet unexcavated) tomb of Qin Shi Huang Di. They have chosen to exclude foreign scholars from this effort.

By visiting it and paying the entrance fee I am helping to preserve this wonder for generations to come. The presence of tourists does add slightly to the risks that the restored warriors face: humidity breathing and from the air conditioning; vibration, and distraction of the scholars working on the site. I agree that flash pictures are also a potential source of damage, but none of the people who posted here needed to use flash. Available light photography is neutral, and may even reduce the amount of time that a visitor feels the need to stand in the presence of the warriors.

On a positive side, the experience is enhanced for us by being able to capture our memories in a camera. Going over them and sharing them allows us to relive our visits. This makes the site more attractive to tourists and increases the flow of funds necessary to carry on the excavation.

I look forward to returning to see what might be discovered inside that tomb. It is larger than the Pyramid of Cheops and contemporary chroniclers told of domes painted like the night sky with rivers of mercury flowing under them.
 
Old Jul 1st, 2001, 03:50 AM
  #12  
Cynthia
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Hi John:

I was at Xian about 2 weeks ago. Our guide asked the guard if it was okay to take photos; once he said yes, then we took our pictures.

Happy Travels!

Cynthia
 
Old Jul 1st, 2001, 05:40 AM
  #13  
kang
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It is truely unfortunate that many people, mostly domestic Chinese tourists, ignore the "no flash" rules, in Teracotta Statue Museum, or other places, without concerns of the harms of their ignorances. I think the situation will get better over time just like "no smoking" rules that are much better obeied in public places today in China than they were not too long ago.

My own solution for "no flash" rules, which works very well, is to always bring with me one or two roll high speed films, ASA800 or higher, for special needs. The quality of the pictures from high speed film are better, usually more natural. Also, buy a lead film bag just to protect your high speed films from airport X rays. Too much X ray will cause problems.
 

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