Tibet itinerary - any advice?

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Feb 18th, 2005, 02:45 AM
  #1
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Tibet itinerary - any advice?

Hi all,

I contacted a travel agent in Guilin for an itinerary to go to Tibet. This is what they are suggesting. I know very little about Tibet. Can you tell me what you think? My friend would like to spend more time at a monastry, is that feasible?

Day01: Fly to Lhasa by yourself, our guide will pick you up from the airport and transfer to your hotel. The rest of the day is for you to acclimatise the high altitude.

Day02: After breakfast, drive to visit the holy Potala Palace, Jhokang Temple and the Parkor Street.

Day03: Morning visit the Tsepung Monastery, one among the 6 most well known monasteries for Gelupa in Tibetan area. In the afternoon, drive to Yangbajing, then to Dangxiong, to Namtso Lake, stay overnight by the lake in simple guesthouse. Enjoy the beautiful sunset.

Day04: Get up in the morning to view the sunrise, after breakfast walk around the lakeside. Drive back to Lhasa in the afternoon.

Day05: Transfer to the airport for your flight to Chengdu. Tour end.

Many thanks,

Laura
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Feb 18th, 2005, 03:02 AM
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My advice is: go to Bhutan, don't give the PRC any more money in Tibet or an additional change to convice you that their occupation is friendly.....or that religious freedom exists in Tibet or the PRC generally.
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Feb 18th, 2005, 08:36 PM
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I posted a report on Tibet so you can search this site. In it I list a very reliable travel agency and some of the sites I saw. If you'd like to see my photos, please visit www.pbase.com/msallen/tibet_2004
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Feb 19th, 2005, 02:59 AM
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Well, yes, Cicerone, up to a point. But Bhutan is not spotless either when it comes to human rights, is it?

As for the OP's itinerary. I would want a lot longer to acclimatise before rushing around. It takes a while to feel comfortable at that altitude.
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Feb 23rd, 2005, 11:17 AM
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I would agree that the itinerary does sound a bit rushed, but if you think this is your only opportunity to visit Tibet and you want to spend some time outside of Lhasa, then go for it. I know the rate of acclimatization is different for everyone but by day 2 we felt pretty acclimatized and by day 3 we could have moved on. I don't know what the elevation is at Namtso lake, perhaps you should find out. On the other hand, there is enough to see in and around Lhasa that you could spend all 4 nights there.
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Feb 23rd, 2005, 11:36 AM
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Lauradublin:

You would need at least 4 full days in Lhasa itself. One day at least to acclamatize with the weather due to high altitude. You will need :
1 Day for Jokhang/Barkhor Bazaar and Potala Palace, another day for Drepung and Sera Monastery. The Sera Monastery allows you to say there for a nominal charge, another day for the Tibetean Institute of Medicine and last day for a little look around on your own.

Hope this help. Email me at [email protected] if you need additional info

Cheers

Joe Chan
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Feb 25th, 2005, 03:10 AM
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Thanks for all the info. I think we have decided that we will fly to Lhasa ourselves and see how we go from there.

Laura
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Feb 25th, 2005, 04:17 AM
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Alice13, if we based where we travel on a country’s human rights record, no one would travel to the US . . . . I draw my line when a country invades another country. If you want to severely restrict the personal freedoms of your own citizens (Burma, China are prime examples) that is one thing, but when you impose restrictions on non-citizens while occupying their country that is another, IMO. I don’t post here advising against travel to China or Burma, but do draw the line at Tibet.

Of course Iraq is a whole ‘nother issue and this is not the place for it.
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Feb 25th, 2005, 05:28 AM
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Cicerone - Don't want to get into a political discussion. But I just don't quite get why/how you think it'll be better for the Tibetians by us not visiting Tibet.

You think if we all don't go, so fewer Chinese investments (hotels, infrastructure), etc, will be better off? I am asking a serious question here. I too believe Tibet should be independent, but I just wonder if "boycotting" travel by foreigners will help that cause or not.
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Feb 25th, 2005, 05:48 AM
  #10
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Surely it is more important for more people to visit Tibet. I really knew very little about Tibet before deciding to visit there, but now at least I am very aware of the situation. I would think that the more people who know the better. Am I just being ignorant? Maybe I'm missing something?

Laura
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Feb 25th, 2005, 09:31 AM
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Yeah, I know it's not exactly the same, but that's somewhat similar to say don't go to East Jerusalem (including the Old City), because it's occupied by Israel.
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Feb 25th, 2005, 03:37 PM
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Wake up. Go and spend a 100$ at a local store and ask the salesperson if it would be better for them if you boycotted their country by not visiting.
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