Shanghai in 3 days

Old Aug 23rd, 2001, 12:06 PM
  #1  
judy
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Shanghai in 3 days

We will be in Shanghai for only 3 days and would like advice on hotels and "must see" spots.
 
Old Aug 23rd, 2001, 08:03 PM
  #2  
Ricky
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Refer to the post "Shanghai - should we go?" in the forum.
 
Old Aug 24th, 2001, 07:49 PM
  #3  
Jane
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"Should we go"

Absolutely, although 3 days is a long time. Make sure you see the Shanghai Provincial (?) Museum and allow at least 3 hours. Make sure you get to what used to be the "old" shanghai--where they used to have the "no chines and no dogs" posters. I believe we stayed at the J.C. Mandarin which was fabulous and very centrally located. But I'm a little fuzzy on some of my names these days. Also pretty cool to walk along the Bundt.
 
Old Sep 6th, 2001, 05:52 AM
  #4  
cb
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Peace Hotel was great, across the waterfront. At night, go to the top for a great view.

Don't miss the Shanghai Museum and pagoda with the jade buddha, stroll the Bundt, have tea at the oldest tea house in Shanghai with the crooked bridge, and that Chinese garden (someone help with the names).
 
Old Sep 6th, 2001, 09:48 AM
  #5  
Eric
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The 'no chinese and no dogs' poster is a convenient legend, and has no basis in truth.

The original sign reserved the use of the park in the International Concession--land leased and parcelled out by foreigners--for foreign residents, except for Chinese employees of foreign families, such as amahs.

Unlike in many other treaty ports and concession areas, Chinese were allowed to reside in the International Concession, and in fact flocked to do so, rather liking proper paved roads, decent sanitation, and something resembling law and order and a decently impartial legal system. In short they preferred to live under foreign control than that of their own government(s), and eventually they outnumbered foreigners about five to one. Even communist agitators preferred to base themselves there--Mao amongst them for a while. It's this unpalatable and face-losing fact which makes the current authorities, determined to blame foreigners for everything that went wrong in China in the 19th and 20th centuries, continually trot out this imaginative gloss on the situation.

The sign also went on to forbid dogs, as many parks throughout the world still do today.

Although there's a great deal to regret about foreign activites in China in times past, let's get the context right, shall we?

Eric
 

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