Planes should be scent-free zones?

Jun 22nd, 2001, 06:41 AM
  #1  
No Estee, Please!
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Planes should be scent-free zones?

A thread on the Europe forum raises the issue of noxious, overpowering fragrance -- perfume, cologne, aftershave -- on planes. I think airlines should make flights "scent-free" zones. Is this a problem you have had? What do you think?
 
Jun 22nd, 2001, 08:00 AM
  #2  
Marie
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I agree with you. Recently on a 10 hour trip from New York to Brazil I had a miserable time thanks to the overpowering scents emmanating from the person sitting next to me. She basically bathed herself in a very
strong perfume which trigger my allergies and later during the flight she proceeded to paint her nails with something that smelled wicked! It gave me a migraine. BTW, flight attendants were not any better when it came to strong perfumes and colognes.
 
Jun 24th, 2001, 09:28 AM
  #3  
Tricia
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People really need to get over using perfumes- they were invented for different era- when we couldn't take daily baths- people don't need to bathe themselves with perfume anymore- and we now know how bad they are for our allergies...so why keep using them? offices, planes, movies theatres... if don't want someone sneezing all the time please refrain...
 
Jun 26th, 2001, 04:42 AM
  #4  
Englishgirl
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Tricia - It's called European Glamour (something that American women - eunuchs of the first degree - would find difficult to comprehend).
 
Jul 7th, 2001, 07:47 PM
  #5  
Kolly
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To "Englishgirl" -- whom I suspect to be a male and actually just one of the "regular" idiots around here who has a comment about everything -- look up "eunuch" and note that it is utterly inapplicable here. And in my dictionary, "glamour" does not list any definition that requires application of overpowering scent in lieu of bathing.

YES, airplanes should be scent-free zones, ABSOLUTELY!
 
Jul 8th, 2001, 10:23 AM
  #6  
traveller
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I agree - they are smoke free and should also be scent free. I can tolerate smoke far more easily that perfumes etc. I get an instant headache from overpowering perfumes. (But sometimes on Itnl flights, there is a great deal of BO also) - frankly, give me the BO over the perfume. Although unpleasant, it does not make me ill as do perfumes. Good post, OP
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 10:16 AM
  #7  
Maggie
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I absolutely agree! There's nothing worse than being trapped at 30,000 ft next to someone who is wearing an entire bottle of perfume. Granted, other then moving, there's not much you can do for relief; however, as to nail polish, I smile and politely inform the offender that I am allergic to the scent and ask them very kindly to put it away. I've never had a problem.
 
Jul 15th, 2001, 12:15 PM
  #8  
moira_v
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I agree. It's also about time serving of alcohol was also banned.
It amazes me that in most countries kids are not permitted in bars selling alcohol simply for the reason that kids should not be encouraged to drink. Why then are airlines permitted to serve alcohol in an enviroment where kids are also present? I cannot count the number of time I have had to sit next to people who are 'drunk' on planes. It is the Number 1 cause of air-rage. What do you think?
 
Jul 15th, 2001, 01:54 PM
  #9  
Nofumes
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Yes!!! Make planes fume free. Most don't know how to apply fragrance and nothing is more annoying than to sit near someone who bathes in fumes, especially when one has allergies. Ban the fumes I say!
 
Jul 17th, 2001, 04:43 PM
  #10  
Ryan
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"It amazes me that in most countries kids are not permitted in bars selling alcohol simply for the reason that kids should not be encouraged to drink."

Did you actually type this?? If this were the case, children/kids would not be permitted in any establishment selling alcohol. The reasoning behind banning youth from bars is not to discourage drinking--it's simply because in most cases, the age group being excluded is one that cannot legally drink.

However...you raise an interesting point when it comes to serving alcohol on airplanes. Is it necessary? For someone like me who is a nervous flyer, a drink or two can help calm the nerves. But clearly, alcohol has played an increasing role in air-rage incidents. Perhaps it is time that the rules governing alcohol consuption be examined--not because of any message it sends to children as was implied by your post--but because its effects have played a role in incidents of violence.
 

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