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yellow fever

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Jun 8th, 2010, 06:01 AM
  #1
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yellow fever

Sorry, it's me again. I am going to Kenya, Tanzania and Zanzibar end July, beginning August and I have read that for Tanzania you need a vaccination for yellow fever and I have read that you don't need.
So I am confused. Somebody knows what is true.
Thanks
Heinz
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Jun 8th, 2010, 08:14 AM
  #2
 
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Both countries require proof of yellow fever vaccination if you've just spent time in another YF endemic country (both Kenya and Tanzania are YF endemic countries). They may not always enforce it at the border/airport but you never know when they'll decide to ask.
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Jun 8th, 2010, 02:41 PM
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If you visit 2 East African countries then you definitely need the vaccination! You have to produce your certificate when you cross borders!

SV

PS
When we visited in Feb and crossed borders several times we every time had to show the certificate!
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Jun 9th, 2010, 10:59 AM
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It's supposed to apply if you've travelled from a country with yf but they change the rules constantly so best just to get the jab as it lasts 10 years anyway and you'll cover yourself against the disease too.
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Jun 9th, 2010, 12:00 PM
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We just came back from the travel doc who said we should get the YF vaccine, even though we're only going to Kenya. Opinions?
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Jun 9th, 2010, 12:19 PM
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cross
only if one COMES from one YF country and wants to enter another one the vaccine is requested. Flying in/out of one of those infested countries from/to - home: Not required!

SV
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Jun 10th, 2010, 12:29 PM
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"Not required", but who wants Yellow Fever?
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Jun 10th, 2010, 02:22 PM
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I'm curious as well what others think since we are scheduled to meet with a travel doc in a few weeks. If he recommends YF vaccine I wonder if I should argue the point. We are going only to Kenya BTW. I can't imagine any doctor not recommending it when you are going to a YF endemic country just to cover themselves. If a patient did get it by some remote chance wouldn't they fear you would accuse them of making poor recommendations.
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Jun 10th, 2010, 02:49 PM
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FWIW I didn't get the YF vaccine until my 4th trip to Kenya (I also went to the Seychelles that trip which requires it if coming from a YF endemic country). My understanding is that the last outbreak in Kenya was quite some time ago. It's your decision.
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Jun 10th, 2010, 04:22 PM
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We know it's not required for Kenya if that's our sole destination, but our travel doc said:
- it only takes one bite from one mosquito to get YF; once you have it there is no treatment and it can be fatal, so it is not worth taking even the slightest chance because the vaccine is so effective
- because the early symptoms of YF are similar to malaria, Kenya public health cannot be absolutely certain that there haven't been any cases
- as you get older, the chances of not being a candidate for the vaccine increase...since we are such avid travelers we might as well get it now, because we'll probably eventually need it anyway.

So, I think we will do it. I thought we just needed malarone and we were good to go, but it turns out we're due for typhoid again as well. I agree that it might be overkill...but why take a risk? Our doc works with many film crews and volunteers in Africa and she said that 99% of her Kenya-bound patients opt to get the vaccine.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 04:22 AM
  #11
 
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He has some good points. After hearing them I think I agree with you to get it. I know some have said their doctors have prescribed medicine for intenstinal problems just as a precaution should a problem arise. Did your doctor mention this? Shame to have something like that ruin any of your time there. I still have some bad memeories from a trip to Mexico a long time ago.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 08:30 AM
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Yes, we she gave us a whole slew of antibiotics (Cipro, Z-pac) and anti-nausea meds, just in case. It is also a good idea to take Pepto Bismol and electrolyte packets for traveler's diarrhea. We travel often to Latin America and fortunately, we've never had to use more the the PB there, but the antibiotics are good to have for other issues as well. (I took the Cipro for an ear infection in Thailand after emailing the doctor about it.)
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Jun 11th, 2010, 10:06 AM
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Our doctor prescribed the antibiotic Xifaxan as it works specifically on the intestines. I've been carrying it around but haven't used it yet.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 07:24 PM
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Patty:

Actually I do not think that Xifaxan is that great a drug.

It's mode of action appears to be quite limited in that it is weakly effective against E.Coli ,and that E. Coli is the non- invasive type.

In fact if you get Travellers Diarrhea from an organism other than E. Coli ( and how would you know this !!), then Xifaxan is not the antibiotic you need.

Also if your diarrhea does not clear up in one day.....they recommend to use another antibiotic.

Then you also have to take this antibiotic ( Xifaxan ) 3 times a day.

When you are sick , nauseated and have diarrhea, you really do not want to take a pill three times a day.

AND , if you should get infected with the Enterotoxin E. Coli, now you are REALLY sick and the Xifaxan does not help for this at all !!

A much better drug is Cipro. It's mode of action is better , it has less side effects and it only has to be taken once a day.....

if you get the 1000 mgm pill ( or 500 mgm twice a day for 3 days)

I would also take Imodium but not the tablet form.

Get the "Quick-Dissolve" type. It says "Quick Dis-solve " right on the box .

Just place a "Quick Dis-solve" on your tongue and before you can count to 8- 10 , it is gone !!
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Jun 11th, 2010, 07:44 PM
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Very interesting, especially about the Imodium. I think most people would want to carry the tablet form as opposed to the heavy liquid but I didn't know about the "quick dissolve" form. I know nothing about any of these meds but it sounds like Cipro would work better and will make an interesting topic for discussion with the travel doctor. BTW, what exactly is Z- pac?
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Jun 11th, 2010, 07:49 PM
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BTW, forgot to ask. Does anyone have an opinion about Pepto Bismol vs. Imodium. I've heard that Pepto is less effective but not by any authority.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 08:19 PM
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long2travel:

Z-Pak, is the antiobiotic Zithromax.

it is used mainly for Upper Respiratory Infections and also Bronchcitis.


I would not take it unless you are not able to use Cipro.

Too many side effects , you have to take it too often .

It is not superior to Cipro.

Imodium is a much better anti-diarrhea medication than Pepto Bismol.

Pepto Bismol has been around for a long time and it's active anti-diarrhea action comes from Kaopectate.. remember the old Kaopectate you could get over the counter. !!

There is still a more potent anti-diarrhea drug and it is called Lomotil..........But

you need a doctors precription for this.

I take Cipro and Imodium ( and Lomotil ) with me on trips.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 08:24 PM
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OK now I feel obligated to ask "what is Lomotil?"
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Jun 11th, 2010, 08:31 PM
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I just realized you explained Lomotil above as a prescription anti-diarrhea medication.

Thank so much for the details about the various meds out there. Gives me a starting point for discussion with the travel doc.

Sorry hh253 for taking over the thread.
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Jun 11th, 2010, 08:45 PM
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I don't think hh253 will mind because Cipro and Imodium is something she( he ) should consider.

went I went to Kenya ,Tanzania and Zanzibar last August,September.

( I also take Tamiflu with me ....I have two boxes of them and they do not expire until 2013 July ), because you can get the flu bug anywhere , anytime.

The flu " bug" may be a winter time illness in North American ....... but it is almost year round in many other places.

Oh yes, and another thing, I always take injectable Gravol ( Dramamine) with me ... I have used it on myself and have helped other travellers who were acutely nauseatd and vomiting.

All these medications are good for several years...so if you do not use them, you bring them back home and you have them for the next trip !!
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