Tanzania and back

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Jul 1st, 2002, 04:59 PM
  #1
Dick
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Tanzania and back

Wife, daughter of 15 and I had a great (but too short) trip in Tanzania--Lake Manyara, Serengeti, and Ngorongoro Crater returning on June 19th. We landed at Kilamangaro Airport at 8:30 and moved thru passport control and customs with no problem (although the process seemed slow--excited maybe yes!!). Were not asked about yellow fever innoculation. Noted several travelers purchased visa with apparently no difficulty. Our 2Afrika guide then took us to overnite lodge outside of Arusha. Having been in Middle East 2 years ago I thought I was prepared for culture shock but trip off main road to lodge was an "eye openner". Road was a crude as I have ever seen and was lines with small huts as houses and shops. We had one half a circular building constructed like a traditional hut. Own bathroom with hot/cold running water and a roomy bedroom with 3 single beds each covered with mosquito netting. During the nite a dog (s) would bark. I pictured wildlife running through the compound but in morning realized area was quite populated. Breakfast was in formal dining room with staff serving eggs/choice of meats. We helped ourselves to hot/cold cereal, juice, fruit, toast, and coffee/tea. The lodge was nicely landscaped with numerous trees and shrubs. At 8:30 we were off for Arusha. Numeous small homes and shops lined the road with the occassional herd of cattle or goats extra. Vendors were selling everything from shoes to cut lumber to fruit to freshly roasted ears of corn. In Arusha we stopped at the office of Predators Safari Club for a briefing on the tour. There we also had opportunity to exchange dollars for T. shillings. The larger US bills had a better exchange rate. All in all not having any local currency was no problem. US dollars accepted everywhere. Arusha is of some 100,000 people and all seemed to be out that morning. Many people seemed busy--moving products via wheel barrows with large tires, tending stands, making furniture, tending gardens, trimming roadside vegetation etc. Our first and only intentional shopping stop by our guide was the Culture Center. Supposedly it is noted for being a good place for purchasing items including tanzanite. On the return to Arusha we requested to stop there recalling the selection and prices. Even there bargaining was expected (except for tanzanite). Purchases could be shipped and charges via a credit card had an extra 5 percent surcharge. More later

 
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Jul 1st, 2002, 05:16 PM
  #2
Dick
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Part 2. As we moved on I was struck with the beauty of the countryside. Occassional huts/small homestead added color and variety to the semi-arid region. Herds of cattle and goats often tended by young boys often drifted across the road. Some time later we turned off the main (paved) road onto a dirt/gravel one that was being paved. Talk about dust!! The "beware of invisibility" sign got our attention. I had to remember we were in Tanzania where driving on the left side is the norm. Soon we began seeing the first wildlife--zebra, ostrich, and wildebeast. When we neared the small town near Lake Manyara Godfrey informed us the area produces lots of rice. Then, we entered Lake Manyara National Park for the first game drive. Godfrey put up the roof in our van and I was about as excited as I often am on the first day of hunting season here in Pa. We saw sausage trees with baloni shaped fruit eaten only by baboons and elephants. The vegetation was quite lush as we moved into the park and we began seeing wildlife at every turn in the road. It was almost as if we were on a Disneyworld trail where a sensor would begin a new annimation. We saw dik dik, Thompson gazelle, elephant, hippo, baboon, giraffe, warthog, monkey, impala, ostrich, monitor lizzard and numerous species of birds. Given the vegetation present even as we moved out into shrubland we were able to get quite close of numerous animals and birds. We had lunch at a picnic area at a higher elevation giving an great view of Lake Manyara. Around the picnic area droppings of herbivores reminded me we were not in Disneyworld. The box lunch included a sandwich (kinda like an egg omlet with veggies), a fried doughy thing filled with ground meat, crackers, cheese, pastry, an apple and a box of juice. And, yes Godfrey had a cooler of chilled bottled water when ever we wanted. I was glad my wife packed the individual handwipes (maybe that is one reason none of us had stomach or other problems). Continuing on the game drive we saw more wildlife. Often while one animal gave us reason to stop, if one looked around different ones were to be seen. And, the huge baobab trees added to the landscape. Later we excited the park and headed up the mountain passing cultivated areas of corn and small gardens, small huts often with colorful flowers such as Morning Glory in full bloom, and herds of cattle. Then we came to the Kirurumu Tented Lodge for the evening stay.
 
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Jul 1st, 2002, 05:32 PM
  #3
Dick
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One thing I am glad we was a small notebook. I tried each evening to make a few notes. These details may be too much for entry on this forum so I will attempt to be a bit briefer. The Kirurumu Tented Lodge was great! Each "lodge" was a selfcontained tent on an elevated platform and under a permanent roof, complete with electricity and a bathroom w/shower and running water. The bathroom could be isolated from the rest of the tent. Each bed had a mosquito net. The next closest tent was at least 75 feet away and the area was very quiet. View from dinning room veranda was great--Lake Manyara in the distance. Food was excellent as was the setting and service. Complete set of dinning room silverware and glasses. Multi-course meal of rolls, red bean salad, soup, and a choice of entries (I had steak cooked in red wine with potatoes, carrots and green beans. The other choice was a Tanzanian dish of fish with rice and coconut sauce. Cake with sauce for desert. Beer, wine, soda, bottled water were extra but at very nominal price. A 0.5 liter of Safari Beer was about $2. Other than a small green snake in the bathroom the nite was uneventful. Breakfast was similar to that described earlier.
I trust the reader will get the impression that we enjoyed the trip and were quite satisfied with 2Afrika. We took some 18 rolls of print film. The scenery in the Serengeti was simply outstanding. I recalling looking around from horizon to horizon seeing grassland and in many places too many animals to count. We saw more species of antelope, puff adder, lions, cheetah, numerous lions including groups feasting on wildebeast, hippo, elephant, leopard, ostrich, a croc, cape buffalo, numerous birds, hyaena, jackal, serval cat, and more. The Serengeti Sopa Lodge was way more than I expected in regards to setting (right new to shrubland in the Serengeti foothills) with wildlife practically at our balcony. If someone wants to hear more I will be glad to continue. Otherwise I may be exceeding the liberties of this forum. We had a great trip! Dick
 
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Jul 1st, 2002, 06:38 PM
  #4
Cindy
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Please! Continue! And thanks for the trip report so far!
 
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Jul 2nd, 2002, 10:25 AM
  #5
SG
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More Please!!!
 
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Jul 2nd, 2002, 11:09 AM
  #6
Anna
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More!!
 
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Jul 2nd, 2002, 12:44 PM
  #7
Dick
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Another set of notes. As we traveled to the Serengeti we stopped at a Maasi Village. Such was an optional item and cost $50 per vehicle. We paid a village member not the guide. The fee entitled us to take all the photos we wanted, to observe the singing and dancing, to inspect the inside of a hut and of course to walk around the village and yes to purchase craft items. I spoke quite a bit with one of the adult men who wanted to know about my family. I wanted to learn more about their cattle and asked him what kind they were (they were out on the plains grazing somewhere). He said they had bulls and cows (so much for my asking about specific breeds but he did answer my question). The village of some 15 or so huts was surrouded with vertical posts as a support for piles of thorny brush to keep out predators. The center part of the village had a corral for holding the cattle for milking, nite stay, etc. We were encouraged to walk aaround the outside of the corral as crafts (necklaces, bracelets, spears, etc were display. Bargaining was expected. I am sure we paid more than they would have settled for but since I saw persons including a youngster of 7 or so, making items I felt okay knowing the money was for local wants. Several of our group visited the inside of the stick, mud and manure huts about my height and relatively small. The tribe members were very cordial and not pushy. We were also treated to observe the youngsters in the school which was outside the village. They sang for us and we were asked if we cared to make a donation such would be used for the school.The one villager took me outside and upon onto small hill overlooking the village. We talked about development and how he didn't want resorts and the like in the area. Didn't exactly use the same words but I could tell of his love for the land and how it could be ruined. Then on to Serengeti. Very dusty roads. I realized as we crossed dry stream beds what conditions would be like in the rainy season and how 4wheel drives would be needed. Occassionally we would pass fully dressed (in native attire) Massai standing along the road. Some were there specifically for tourists to stop and take photos (with a tip). Came to checkpoint for entry to Serengeti Park. Took short hike up rocky mound called a Kopie. Great view of the area for miles. Numerous birds and small lizard (geccho sp). Colorful starlings (named Superb) were plentiful and as we discovered later really enjoyed bread and other lunch items. We had lunch at small visitor's center overlooking the Olduvai Gorge. Scenic view was great as we could easily see 5 major geologic layers including one where the Leakey digs unearthed fossils of ancient man. Would like to have been able to "poke around" in the gorge but that is for another trip. Numerous song birds frequented the lunch area and I regreted we did not have a bird book. An avid birder would have enjoyed the place. Obviously, binoculars are a must. A point about purchasing items. Most of the little shops at visitor centers and park entrances had great prices as some items at lodge shops would be double in price. Another post in a few minutes.
 
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Jul 2nd, 2002, 01:10 PM
  #8
Dick
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In our travels on the Serengeti Godfrey would stop for us to view each new wildlife species or whenever he saw us pointing cameras and/or arms. Density of critters kept increasing. Birds included oxpecker, kori bustard, grey crowned crane, and one little guy that seemed to be on rocks about every 100 feet along the road, and ostrich and of course vulture. Lions were in abundance. Elephant seemed most likely along "greener" areas that usually were along watercourses or in depressions that most likely were wetter. Just like at Lake Manyara when we might stop to see species "x" someone would see something else. Godfrey could only see so much being that he had to drive so we could contriubte to sightings. After awhile I never wanted to sit even though the van was moving at a fairly good clip. Late in the afternoon we noted major grass/brush fires in the distance and Godfrey mentioned such were intentionally set to retard brush and trees from taking over the grassland. In my wildlife management classes we would call that natural succession suppression. In the distance we soon saw the Serengeti Sopa Lodge at the edge of the foothills next to the plains. By then the air was a bit hazy from the smoke and yes the dust from so many zebra and wildebeast running here and there. As we pulled in front of the Lodge we were greeted with cold moist towels (for freshing up) as well as a glass of cold juice. The combination hit the spot! We checked in and the porters carried our bags to the room. I routinely tipped each porter according to a protocol I read somewhere. The only other tipping that I recall being expected on the trip was to our guide at trip's end. All the cooks, waiters, etc at the lodges supposedly were tipped from our package price. Our room was with 2 double beds- queen size, each with mosquito netting in the shape of a pyramid which the staff let down when we had dinner. A very large bathroom with shower and a large entry way room. Balcony gave a great view of the Serengeti Plains. The hillside immediately adjacent to the balcony was open with shrubs and higher trees further away. I could see game trails with ease and a small watering pool was about 50 yards from the lodge patio/pool area. Quite a few more guests were at this lodge and I recognized names of other safari companies on the vehicles. Gift shop prices were much higher as I mentioned. One could purchase stamps for post cards. Might add it took at least 10 days for postcards to show up back home.
Lodge had bar area, two gift shops, outside pool and much larger dining room. Several dozen people were present. We readied laundry for turning in the next morning for del same day. Prices were very nominal ($1.50 for pair of trousers and $0.75 per undergarment as an idea). Dinner was simply great!! basically there were 2 choices for each course with 4 for main entrie (including local dish and a vegetarian one). Drinks were up to us but again at a very reasonable price. Beer was in smaller size bottle though. One dinner I recall- appetizer (salad or small portion of chicken pot pie), soup (cream of water cress or broth w/pasta), entrie (beef stew, tilapia, a vegetarian dish or pork chop). I had the pork chop with curried pineapple, potatoes and green beans. We shipped dessert as we thought the hot water was on only from 5-9 and we wanted to shower. I think we were misinformed. Had a Castle Beer. Found bed turned down, netting readied, laundry picked up. I wentout on the balcony to the dismay of the ladies as I apparently let in a couple of mosquitoes. One could see the grass fire miles away (it soon died down with the moisture of the evening), smell the smoke but also see a large head of zebra and gnu on the plains. Next report will be about all day on the Serengeti.
 
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Jul 2nd, 2002, 02:51 PM
  #9
Thyra
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Hi Dick,
Great trip report!!! I am so glad you had such a wonderful time!!!! I remember you posting before your departure and I was wondering how it went... sounds like you had a spectacular time... oh, I really want to go back again.
 
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Jul 3rd, 2002, 03:53 AM
  #10
Dick
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Thyra, thank you. One reason I enjoy doing this report is to in a small way repay several of you who provided tips/hints that made our trip that much more enjoyable.
I continue.... We arose at 6. Out on the balcony I heard several birds with background of wildebeast and zebra. It was still dark. Breakfast was usual buffet style but at omlet station the chef would do custom eggs/omlets/paper thin pancakes. Before we had proceeded even a couple hundred yards from the lodge we began seeing wildlife including zebra, wildebeast, topi, andcooks hartebeast. Godfrey stopped along the stream for our first and only sighting of a croc. Then, we came out onto the plains for the numerous herds of large herbivores. We were reminded that some 1.6 million wildebeast and 800,000 zebra inhabit the plains. For lunch we stopped at small visitor center. This one had a "game trailing" up and around a kopie. Theme was wildebeast migration and tracks cast into the path led the way. The one huge boulder reminded us of Pride Rock on the disney lion king movie. Hydrax inhabitat this area--neat groundhog size rodents. Lunch included cold fired chicken, dried beef sandwich, a local trail mix, small banana, cake, orange, chips and water.
Lots more wildlife. Lions continued to be common. Couple of times we spotted them on kopies. Then we came upon a groupp of 15 or so on a fresh wildebeast kill. Got close enough to not only see their bloodstained faces, hear the bones being crunched but also could smell the partially digested grass from the now gutted wildebeasts stomach. Vultures perches on nearby high points. What a sight and only the two vans of our 11 person group.
Got back to lodge around 5:30. Showered, visited shop, sat on balcony. Air was much cleaner. Another great dinner!!

Up at 5:15 for early morning game drive. Hot tea/coffee available w/crackers. Saw sunrise on the plains. Large cape buffalo at lodge area and spotted a hare running down the lane. Came upon lioness stalking a small herd of wildebeast. Was pulling for the lioness. Thought she would take the one limping wildebeast but she rushed the charge and the herd sped off. Further up the valley we then came upon a another kill. A lioness and cub were feeding on another wildebeast. Nearby was maned lion. Came back to lodge for breakfast and checking out. Tab for beverages for 2 nite's dinning and laundry came to $22. Within couple 100 yards of the lodge saw puff adder on the road. Beth spotted lioness in acacia tree (may have been one from the unsuccessful hunt). Saw our one and only cheetah in the shade of small tree. Seemed to be able to see forever on the endless plains. Serval cat, jackal,more lions, hippo, monitor lizzard, egyptian geese, fisher lover birds and more antelope, gnu, giraffe, zebra. On the way to Ngorongora Crater.
 
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Jul 3rd, 2002, 10:52 AM
  #11
Dick
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Needed a break. As we traveled the road on the rim of Ngorongora Crater we saw more herds of cattle and the lushness of the forest. Godfrey reminded us elephants (cows, calves and immature males) frequented this area especially at nite. although midafternoon Darla and I did see backside of one elephant in wooded area just past the police station. Stopped at the overlook as we did on drive first time (on way to Serengeti). Still an emotional view for me. Seeing the many mile across crater and the diversity of habitat there gave me that humble feeling of what the Good Lord created. Just past the turnoff to the lodge some saw a spotted hyaena. Then we could see Ngorongora Sopa Lodge thru the trees and it was obvious this place was well sited for a superb view. From my reading I learned this lodge was the only one on the eastern rim and probably one of the closer ones to the crater floor in regard to access road. We were met at the door with cold drink and hot towels. Spacious lobby, 2 shops, huge bar/lounge, area for tea time, and a huge dinning area. The dining are was circular room with very high ceiling in style of local huts. Walls everywhere were taste fully decorated. Lots of flowers, well kept lawn, pool area and grassy "patio" were overlooking the crater. Our room was one of farthest from the main complex w/considerable (maybe 100 yard walk). view from our sun room was not that great but had woods practically to the window. Game came right up to window. We saw cape buffalo and fellows in next room saw elephants next to end of walkway. Dinner was no disappointment. I had bar-b-que ribs as appetizer, wonton soup, tilapia w/potatoes/veggies, chocolate brownie and water. I fine meal although I would pass on tilapia next time. I am sure it was prepared just right but I am not a big fish eater (even though a fisheries biologist!!). On way back to room we saw chamelions on shrub, hyrax in the tree, huge (and I mean huge) beetles and a owl in tree at room. Entering the room we noted the heat has been turned on. No netting--too cold for mosquitoes (elevation something like 7,600 ft).

Had buffet breakfast with chef preparing omlet. Daniel continued to be our service overseer (same as previous nite). Outside it was very misty, windy and a bit chilly. On way into crater we saw vegetation change from lush rainforest type to eventually open grassland. Saw herds of cape buffalo, gnu, zebra and then lions in earnest. Maned males, females and those with cubs. Near the main freshwater lake we saw what we thought was a cheetah stalking antelope but turned out to be a beautiful leopard which crossed right in front of us. Impressive bull elephants in green grassy area before we got to the small forested area on crater floor. Rest rooms located there. Morning was quite chilly especially with van roof up. Was not until mid-morning that mist on the rim burned off. Elephants in chest high yellow flowers. Crew working on access road with heavy equipment against a background of great scenery and herds of wildlife. Saw 4 rhino most of which were lying down or stationary. One looked as if it had been "tipped" over. Godfrey indicated rhino do not like wind as they can not hear as well and chilly conditions cause them to be less active. Different species of acacia trees noted as well as large bee hives. One more entry should do it.
 
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Jul 3rd, 2002, 11:15 AM
  #12
Dick
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Had lunch in common picnic area along edge of small lake inhabited by hippos at far end. Told to eat in van as large crow-size birds were know to be real pests-swooping down to grab food items. Rest room facilities greatly appreciated by the group. Small group of zebra approached the far edge of the picnic area. I counted some 30 vehicles in the area. Saw the one rhino 200 yards or so from the road. Was a female. One member thought the rhino was kicking up dust but we pointed out she was "making water" with great gusto. Continued seeing lots of wildlife but it was obvious lions were no where as abundance as earlier in the day. Don't recall seeing giraffe in the crater.

Dinner was another fine one. Had sweet/sour chicken wings, bean/beef soup,rolls, roast pork, double chocolate cake, and Kilimanjaro beer. One of the fellows in the other half of our group had a birthday and lodge staff came in (turned down light) singing in native tongue, then in english, with sparklers and a birthday cake. What a great setting!!

After breakfast we left at 8 for Arusha. As we had time before evening flight, Godfrey asked what we wanted to do. couple asked about stopping at a curio/craft stand which we did. We made a few purchases (again with bargaining). Then on to Arusha. We also asked about stopping again at the Culture Center there for shopping. After that Godfrey took us to Predators Safari Club for a debriefing (in his absence). A rather nice touch. Then, on to local Chinese restaurant for noon meal (part of the package). A great feast!! By now only 5 of us as 6th member had gone on with others for Kenya part of their safari. We ordered four different dishes and shared them on a lazy susan. Stil had some 4 hours of freetime. Could have wandered around Arusha but we opted to go over to local hotel (Mount Meru Hotel) and lounge around the pool/patio and chat. Nice way to unwind and they had the 0.5 liter beer and soda. Left for airport at 5 so we could be there for check in at 6 or so. Outprocessing went quite smoothly. KLM has high marks in my book. Great service, real silverware, friendly staff, etc. as to getting film thru scanners--one or two places I was allowed to pass my see-through ziplock bag around the scanner, one place did a hand check (looking in canisters), the rest said my 400 asa film would be okay. Picture quality did not appear affected by screening.

All in all a great trip. I can not compare 2Afrika/Predators Safari Club to others having been just on the one trip.But, I was very pleased and will not hesitate to book with them again. Suggestions (mostly of things we had or wished we had: bring a bird book, certainly binocs for each person, hand wipes, a warm jacket, plenty of film, plenty of one dollar bills, less clothing, smallflashlight, alarm clock, notebook, and yes--small notepads/magazines/reading material to hand out to kids and even older locals. Did get asked for such and I regret not having any. Maybe some chaulk for the school age kids. Probably will think of more stuff later. Again, we had a great time and when I share scanned photos during lunch break this week, the trip came "alive" again. Dick
 
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Jul 3rd, 2002, 11:43 AM
  #13
Liz
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Dick-
What a wonderful trip you had. You really got to see the Best of the best! Most people only dream of seeing all you got to see. How very fortunate to have seen the "migration" up close. One time I lucked into hitting it right in Tanzania and I'll never forget it. You really made my memories come back. The thing that really struck me is the wonder you felt while viewing some sites. I always felt that this is how it was when Christ walked the earth. How beautiful and glorious Africa is. Thank you again. Liz
 
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Jul 3rd, 2002, 11:58 AM
  #14
SG
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Bravo Dick. Thanks for sharing your wonderful experience. Glad the trip was memorable and hope your future travels will also be safe & fun.
 
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Jul 4th, 2002, 05:50 AM
  #15
Anna
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Thanks for the trip report, did you end up buying any Tanzanite?
 
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Jul 4th, 2002, 10:41 AM
  #16
Dick
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Yes, we did. Since the trip was celebration of 30th wedding anniversary I encouraged the wife to get a piece of Tanzanite. Couple of folks in our group were specifically seeking tanzanite so we learned from them. Different grades, flaws, etc. Still kept things reasonable. Again, thanks all for the comments I "relived" the trip as I pondered notes and typed.
 
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Jul 4th, 2002, 04:41 PM
  #17
April
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Thanks for the wonderful report, Dick - great fun to read - and also the name of the starling, which I have always wondered about.
 
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Jul 12th, 2002, 08:01 PM
  #18
Mandy
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Hi Dick,
Thanks or the great trip report, the marvellous experience and enjoyment of your trip really came through in your writing!

I was just wondering about the poverty, and the children of Tanzania? Did you see much poverty? Did you see much of village life? Did the children seem happy? Or did you not see much of that?

I am interested because I am in the process of sponsoring a child in Tanzania, and wondered what your impressions were.
Thanks,
Mandy
 
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Jul 14th, 2002, 02:41 PM
  #19
Dick
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Mandy, thank you for the nice comments. By virtue of the nature of our trip we did not get to see much of the local life except that thru the window of the vehicle. Thus I hesitate to generalize too much and "taint" what is really going on. The children we saw along the road near entrance to Lake Manyara Park seemed to be in great spirits and condition. Watching them play at recess as we passed the school yard I thought I was back in the US except some of the equipment/gear (such as soccer and basket balls) left something to be desired. When our driver stopped at a small store to purchase rice for his personal consumption I recall one youngster asking me if we had any notebooks or reading material for him. When we drove thru Arusha I saw loads of people along the roads/streets and many appeared to be quite industrious. The houses we saw certainly reflected a standard of living different than what many of us are used to here but then again I could not tell as to condition of younger Tanzanians. The youngsters at the Maasai village we visited seemed in great shape. They certainly recited their school lesson for us with vigor. Wish I could be of more help. You might check thru your local church as to conditions via missionary or speciality workers in particular country. If I get the chance to return to Africa I will definitely think ahead and take reading material, small note books, etc.

Dick
 
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Jul 16th, 2002, 12:10 PM
  #20
kavey
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What a wonderful report, Dick it's clear with every sentence how exciting and enjoyable the trip was for you, and what fabulous memories for your daughter too.

The trip sounds terrific and you certainly seem to have seen a lot of wildlife!

Will you be putting photos up anywhere (I used ofoto to share my Africa photos, the link is in a post I made a few months back) and I would love to see your photos if possible.

Kavey
 
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