photo storage devices

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Apr 23rd, 2005, 07:01 PM
  #1
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photo storage devices

I wondered if anyone had used photo storage devices and the pros and cons of any you have used. I am wondering if it would be less expensive to purchase one of these with two 1gig compact flash cards or to purchase several more compact flash cards. Also, how many gig of memory would you bring if you were only bringing compact flash cards?
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Apr 24th, 2005, 01:23 AM
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rather depend on the our long your trip is going to be. I gb mem card gives you a lot of photo storage.
Rich,
Photos and videos of out travels around the globe.
www.franceinfocus.net
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Apr 24th, 2005, 03:00 AM
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I would suggest that 1 gig of memory for a camera would last for varying amounts of time depending on the size of the photos you are taking / storing. I have several digital cameras and my digital SLR can run through a gig in a day easily. With my point and shoot digital I can make a gig last a week or so. I have a Nixvue vista portable photo storage device that holds up to 30 gig and am hoping that will suffice for a month in Africa to download my photo cards but am concerned that it won't be enough. But then I take a lot of photos. I took a lot of memory on photo flash cards on my first trip wth a digital camera (point and shot type) and had a measure of comfort in knowing I could review my photos at any time via camera and know I still had the shots. But I kept deleting the not-so-good shots to make room for more pictures. I used nearly a gig over a 2-week trip to Egypt/Jordan/Israel and supplemented with 400 film shots.
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Apr 24th, 2005, 06:14 AM
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I take a lot of pictures when we travel, and I use the highest setting when taking pics. For a three week trip several years ago, we bought the Kanguru storage device (30-40gig). Works quite nicely. It is light weight enough that I can throw it in the camera bag, and if I need to I can download my memory sticks on the go. But now I have enough memory sticks that I can usually wait until the end of the day when I am in the hotel room to do so. I used it in Africa without any problems - was able to charge it up using the outlet available in the tent for camera battery charging (I think I charged it up once or twice on the two-week trip, and I did not need a converter).

At the end of the trip, I hook it up to my PC and download the photos to my PC. The added advantage is that the Kanguru acts as a back-up device for my photos until I am ready to (or need to) delete them. As well as reading memory sticks, it reads flash cards; I just tested it and my older model reads the new Ultra flash cards as well.

The only downside is that once the photos are loaded into it, while on the road, I cannot view the photos unless I have my laptop with me. It has not been an issue for me, but I believe there are other devices now that have viewers on them.
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Apr 24th, 2005, 05:04 PM
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The Nixvue Vista I mentioned does have a viewer. It is a small screen, about same size as the camera would have, but not the same resolution. But you can zoom in with it and organize your photos. It easily downloads to a PC and takes a CF card without adapters and other memory cards with an adapter.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 08:48 AM
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My wife will generally take about 5GB of pictures on a trip, so we use a Smartdisk Flashtrax. It has a CF card reader built-in, and a 3.5" LCD screen (which is much bigger than the one on the camera). It also has an RCA video out, so if you happen to be staying somewhere that has a TV, you can actually look at your pictures on the TV screen. It comes in 20, 30, 40 and 80 GB sizes. We used it for the first time on a recent trip to Peru and loved it.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 09:11 AM
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We just got an Archos Gmini 400 which is a photo wallet and MP3 player.
We have down loaded serveral books on tape for the long flights over the water to Africa as well as some of our favorite music.
It is really small and has a viewing screen..very cool!
Brenda
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Apr 25th, 2005, 09:44 AM
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My Canon 10D is 6mp and a 1 gig will hold 100-120 images. Carrying enough CF cards is not an option for me. I have a Nixvue Vista 40gb portable hard drive and I would not buy another. It works well as far as transferring and storing the pictures but the battery life is horrible. And it does have a screen but it doesn't work well with RAW files (if you paid the price to have the screen it should work).

Unless you are buying 4 or 5 more 1GB cards then I'm sure this is not something you would consider because it's $500. It's an Epson P2000 and I have seen it and was truly impressed with the size, the transfer speed, the quality and speed of the screen for viewing, the battery life. Negatives are the price and only 40GB. In one review, the guy downloaded 13 1GB cards using the battery power. In addition to being a digital wallet type device, the P-2000 is a capable MP3 audio and movie player. It supports MP3 and AAC formats for audio, and Motion JPG and MPEG-4 for video. Here is a link to one review http://www.luminous-landscape.com/re...s/P-2000.shtml
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Apr 25th, 2005, 09:48 AM
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I only ever use the memory cards themselves - though one time in Italy I had a card, that was acting strangely, burned to a CD for safety. In the bush I don't know where you could do such a transfer - though I expect soon where there's "plunge pools" there'll be digital picture to CD or DVD transfer capability.

I like to spread the photos over several cards and tend to favor the 128MB or 256MB cards. I like to spread the risk across cards and as with most computer related devices, the ones at the extreme in size are the most expensive. I bring a little card wallet to store them in and treat it as dearly as my passport.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 11:04 AM
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Favor,

I think I found the winner:

http://www.luangwariverlodge.com/what_to_bring.htm

As you will see from this link, Luangwa River Lodge in South Luangwa, will do the following:

As far as digital imaging is concerned, Luangwa River Lodge is able to download and write to CD-rom from the following media formats, should you run out of memory.

Sony Memory Stick
Smart Card Media
Sony I Link 4000
Compact Flash

-----I figure that after 7 nights at Kasaka River Lodge and Luangwa River Lodge that I will be ready to download about 10-15 Gigs on my final morning at Luangwa River Lodge. Given the fact that I will likely be going cage diving and whale watching in Cape Town, followed by 4 nights at Londolozi and 3 nights at Simbambili, I will need all the memory storage I can get, and even with the Epson P2000, this storage space that is freed up at Luangwa River Lodge just may come in handy towards the end of my trip!
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Apr 25th, 2005, 11:13 AM
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Size ?? i seem a little lost. When i take pic's on my camera i get 1 pic per MB but an above post is staing 100 MB per pic. In the old days that file size would have been a very high res scan form a 10x8 film positive. Now for me 1mb per photo still gives a sharp image up to 10x8 print size. a 100 mb file must get you a sharp image to billboard size.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 12:16 PM
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Roccco - This will start a mad rush to provide this amenity. Luangwa River Lodge has certainly thrown down the gauntlet.

Surely any self respecting camp believes that they too have "material to photograph that is unequalled on earth!" and that as a result, every guest's memory card collection will be full to bursting!

This may even foreshadow a new metric to gauge camps, forget paws or stars, the thing everyone will want to know is how many CD-ROMs is the camp rated?! ;-)
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Apr 25th, 2005, 12:42 PM
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Rocco - did you get the Epson P2000? If so, have you tested it and how do you like it? Are you using the largest, most versatile setting on your camera, RAW?
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Apr 25th, 2005, 02:17 PM
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re: rdkr

I don't believe I saw an above post that mentioned 100 Mb per pic. Sundowner mentions that he can get 100-120 images into a 1 Gb card. (I think I'm getting around 130 with my 10D - it really depends on the images you're taking)

Each camera will have different settings on the size of picture you can take. Some cameras only take Jpegs of varying size and quality. Some cameras, like a digital SLR, will take RAW files, which is basically the raw image information without any processing or compression. These files tend to be larger. Furthermore, converting a raw file to another format, like Tiff, usually results in an even larger file. I've had 6 megabyte RAW files turn into 18 megabyte Tiff files. This is good for an 8x12 at a high resolution. You can up rez pretty high before the image starts to look bad.

Btw, I've had Tango Drum Scans done of some of my 35mm slides, and I usually ask for a 100 Mb file. That's good to about a 16"x20" print, depending on how picky you are. I would scan an 8"x10" negative for a final image file size of around 500 Mb, which would get you a very large picture indeed with good resolution.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 03:15 PM
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Sundowner,

I have not even got my Canon 20D, yet less the Epson P2000. If I could do it over again, I would have paid the extra $300 to buy the camera at a local camera store rather than online. I bought it through a company called Circuit Digital and my order is now 19 days old and I have only received a tripod, some filters and my batteries thus far.

I had an excellent experience with 17th Street Photo in buying my Sigma 80-400mm lens, but quite the opposite in buying my Canon 20D through Circuit Digital. I should have spent the extra $100 to buy the camera through 17th Street Photo, but the website had said the camera with the 17-85mm IS lens was out of stock, while Circuit Digital claimed to have it in stock.

Even as I was completing my order, the camera was promised to me by April 11th, yet two weeks later I have nothing from them but some useless equipment. Good thing I did not buy this camera a couple weeks before my safari!

For the little it is worth, Circuit Digital was actually quite highly rated by whatever comparative website that I found them on...makes me wonder who has giving them the positive ratings!
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Apr 25th, 2005, 04:28 PM
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Rocco- can you cancel your order for the camera and get elsewhere? 2 places I recommend are B&H Photo in NYC and Allen's Camera in PA. Both are very reputable and their prices are very competetive. If you consider cancelling and if they have already charged your credit card for the camera, make sure they will refund your money immediately.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 04:45 PM
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the epson p-2000 has been one we are considering but we would like to spend less. That said, we do not need it until September so I am hoping that it comes down in price by then. I really hoped someone would be able to steer me to something that would be good but less expensive.
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Apr 25th, 2005, 07:46 PM
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mpkp...
We bought our Archo's G-mini from B&H Photo online for $349.
www.bhphotovideo.com
They are very reputable and the transaction went quite smoothly and quick.
We had looked at the Epson P2000 at a local photo store and the Archos. There are definite trade offs..The Epson has a larger screen with great resolution, 40 gb of memory but is bigger than the Archos Gmini (11 oz)and more expensive.
The G-mini has 20 gb of storage, longer battery life (10 hrs vs 3 for the Epson, is smaller 5.64 oz and about $150 less expensive.
The Archos battery life was a big selling point for us as we like to listen to books on tape and the 10 hours of play time will get us through half of our flight time to Africa.
20 gb of storage was enough to meet our needs.
According to the sales person at our local photo shop..these are two of the best digital media players on the market for ease of use and overall features.
If you don't care about the MP3 capability you may find a less expensive device out there.
Hope this helps...
Happy Travels,
Brenda

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Apr 26th, 2005, 06:39 PM
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sundowner,

My camera arrived today!

It is awesome...I think I will sleep with it.

I have not had the chance to try out my Sigma 80-400mm lens (my camera arrived to my office while I had long ago taken the Sigma lens home), but I am very impressed with the 17-85mm IS lens.

I am just trying to figure out how much memory I should buy. I am tempted to buy about 3 more gigs (I have 1 gig now), as this would give me 2 gigs per camera, as I do intend to now buy a Canon Digital Rebel XT which will serve as the sole camera for the 17-85mm lens while the Canon 20D will serve as the sole camera for the 80-400mm lens.

Also, I did get one long life battery for my 20D, but I figure that I will get a backup for the 20D and 2 for the Digital Rebel XT.

The Epson P2000 definitely looks like the way to go on the download device and the Sigma EF 500 Super flash looks like the best value for the flash.

It is a relief to finally have my camera and lenses, but I am still only about 2/3 of the way there.
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Apr 27th, 2005, 09:52 PM
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A couple weeks ago, the NY Times did a review of storage devices...I'll post it when I am on my other computer.

CF cards are now so cheap that it is almost feasible to just carry extra cards. The 512 CF cards are only about $50 at Costco.

Personally, I like the 512 cards, because if you are shooting 6mb photos, you have to change cards too frequently if you are in an exciting encounter, and that means missing potential action. And the 512 size with fit nicely on a CD. But the point of diversifying risk over many cards is a good one: I once had a 2g card get totally corrupted and I lost some of my best photos. I think this happened sometime on the flight home (though I can't be sure) and for this reason, I now carry a Superdigibin from Adorama as a backup. There are better things to buy now...but even if you have plenty of cards, a backup may be a good idea.
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