New President in Egypt

Reply

Jun 22nd, 2012, 01:05 PM
  #21
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 673
C_C, yes, never a dull moment! Just read reports that Shafiq is to be named president, watch out for more protests and demonstrations. And in all of this the common man will be hurt the most, as always Keep us posted...
geetika is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jun 24th, 2012, 07:37 AM
  #22
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,601
It is official now - Morsi is the President. Whoever geetika heard, was as wrong as the others that were jumping the gun.
All we can do now is wait and see if the Brotherhood will straighten out this country for the better, or will impose many laws that don't help tourists. We hope not.
As some of my (foreign as well as Egyptian) friends have said, Now is the time for the Brotherhood to show the world they are better than the world thinks they are. It is their best chance to show us what they are all about. We will see.
Casual_Cairo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jun 24th, 2012, 10:46 AM
  #23
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 131
Well it is democracy at work. I thought it interesting today with the large MB crowd outside in the 97+ temps and then the rather sparse Shafiq supporters in a ballroom at the Marriott Hotel very well dressed. It clearly shows what is what is wrong in Egypt...the rich and then the rest of the people mostly very poor. It will be a long struggle to get a viable middle class. I do think the majority of the people prefer the MB and an Islamic state...just not the business and tourism sectors. Just an outsider's opinion. Hope the MB can work things out with the military.
turaj is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jun 24th, 2012, 11:09 AM
  #24
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 673
Yes C_C, obviously the report I heard was wrong, let's hope the Brotherhood shows everyone they're made of better stuff. Once the army took over it seemed quite likely they'd declare Shafiq the winner, but Morsi prevailed. Getting a fully functioning democracy going isn't easy but I'd like to think that Egypt is on the right path...
geetika is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 10th, 2012, 02:29 PM
  #25
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 597
Was to be expected: http://bit.ly/LN2idl
tinydancer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 13th, 2012, 09:37 AM
  #26
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,601
td - who is Raymond Ibrahim? Never heard of him, nor could find any bio on him that told me who is is or anything. A couple of journalists (I use the term loosely) have jumped on this Salafeen story recently again - which is no less than 6 months old.
It should not be taken too seriously as the Salafeens are NOT the majority and they are not running the country. It's a bit like the GOP and the Tea Party - some may think they are the same but they aren't, are they?
Casual_Cairo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 13th, 2012, 09:42 AM
  #27
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,601
I just got back from my own holiday and have been told that the Minister of Tourism and the major tour companies (and I suspect that means major hotel chains as well) are pressing Morsi to make a statement about his plans for the Tourism business in Egypt. I think we need to wait to see what he says.
Banning Beer and Bikinis, or Business as Usual, or something in between?
Casual_Cairo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 13th, 2012, 12:51 PM
  #28
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,675
Guess we're all waiting to see what Morsi has to say. Should be interesting for all concerned, one way or the other. I'm sure you and others in the business aren't looking forward to something like Iran where female visitors have to be covered! Ugh!
sandi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 14th, 2012, 12:17 AM
  #29
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,601
Actually interesting that you said that sandi - I had a friend from Egypt take a tour of Iran recently (this last April, I think). The women went with the same impression you have of it and were all ready to be very covered. To their surprise, the women there, while having their hair covered, were much more relaxed and showing more skin than they ever expected. They showed hair - (my understanding from what she said) like what you see in the movies of the 60's when James Dean's girlfriend put on a scarf to ride his motorcycle or go out in the convertible. The normal (upper class) women had neck lines on that showed a little skin (not cleavage, but skin). Not all that bad - right? The ONLY real difference between Egypt and Iran, for them on this trip was that the only alcohol they were able to drink was found at the German Ambassadors home only. So - Iran has banned "beer and bikinis", but it was not as strict as we imagine.

So far the people have been able to pressure Morsi into making some changes after he even made decisions on issues, so I don't fear he is going to go nuts with any changes any time soon. We might have to compromise on some issues, but I hope nothing too BIG.
Casual_Cairo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 14th, 2012, 06:16 AM
  #30
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,675
I've seen/heard likewise, that in many places a headscarf is all that is required. But do recall a trip report, maybe 2-3/yrs back, where the visitor indicated besides the obligatory headscarf, need for some coverup over her regular attire... believe she used a raincoat for this purpose. It might also depend on time of year and whether it's simply too warm/hot to cover, whether locals or visitors.

It also appears obvious that the younger generation of women are protesting what the mullahs dictate they wear, yet from tales, do we know whether those government security people who ride about checking whether woman are/n't covered, they get pulled aside, fined or maybe even put in jail.

It's just so hidden and so many conflicting stories....

For Egypt, we'll just have to see.
sandi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 14th, 2012, 06:56 AM
  #31
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 23,720
I think that required dress for women in Iran varies according to the political situation. I've heard different reports at different times.
thursdaysd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 15th, 2012, 04:40 AM
  #32
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,601
When hearing/reading reports, you really have to take into consideration the source. I've read reports about Cairo where the writer makes it sound like she was put inside a burka to enter the Mohamed Ali Mosque. We KNOW that they don't allow much skin to show, and if they deem you are dressed inappropriately you get given one of those nasty green robes to wear - NOT a burka - but to someone wearing short shorts and thong underwear showing out the top, I'm sure it feels like a burka.
Plus I find recollections of incidents do tend to get exaggerated once you get home. It can be difficult to remember everything as it happened when there is SO MUCH going on and so many new experiences to report on.
Casual_Cairo is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:36 AM.