Egypt travel attire

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Mar 3rd, 2002, 08:36 AM
  #1
alhugh
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Egypt travel attire

traveling to Egypt in late April. Does anyone have suggestions for clothing. Traveling from Cairo to Aswan, cruise and fly.
 
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Mar 4th, 2002, 05:10 AM
  #2
gail
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We went same time last year - Cairo/Aswan/Abu Simbel/cruise/Luxor/Cairo. It was very hot at all historic sites (at Valley of Kings I thought I had never been so hot in my life and it was only April) Still, for sun protection and appropriateness, wear more clothing than you would in US (men or women). Women on trip wore loose cotton pants, skirts, capri length pants. Shoulders covered - looser cotton shirts. Men wore light cotton pants, not shorts (except on cruise). I wore sturdy walking sandals, but many places are not paved - I have tough feet. Small backpack for water, etc. On cruise for dinner wore skirt, men at least collared shirt and dress pants (no t-shirts). At some historic places, esp. mosques, several women in our group were given shawls to wear becasue of clothing deemed too revealing. Others will tell you you can "get away with" less modest dress, but why risk being offensive. Also, above clothing protects from sun. Have a great trip - Egypt is a magic place. Drink lots of water and be careful what you eat. Hope you are as pleasantly surprised at the quality of EgyptAir as we were.
 
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Mar 9th, 2002, 08:05 PM
  #3
noeleen
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I was on a Nile cruise last March. Our tour guide who was egyptian told us to wear what we were comfortable in, which for most it was shorts and sleeveless tops. There are no dress rules at the historical sites. However
if going to visit mosques or going out in the evening something a little more discreet is needed. It was extremely hot
especially in the valley of the kings and gueens so I wore sandals and shorts with sleeveless tops to all the historical sites along the Nile as a lot of people did also. I saw no raised eyebrows at this style of dress.
 
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Apr 1st, 2002, 01:16 PM
  #4
traveler
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I would have raised my eyebrows at you, as I did at all of the morons who insist on dressing like they do back home. It is inappropriate and disrespectful to wear tank tops and shorts in Egypt.
 
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Apr 1st, 2002, 07:29 PM
  #5
Dina
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I have to agree with Gail and traveler above; anytime you get off the cruise boat, respect local customs by dressing modestly. Your photos will be much more exotic-looking too, if you dress to harmonize with the landscape, instead of looking like you were beamed into Egypt from Scranton or Cleveland!
 
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Apr 3rd, 2002, 02:54 AM
  #6
noeleen
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It seems that some people can only express an opinion by name calling. The question asked was how should a person dress. If you read my response I did say more appropriate dress was needed in some areas but it would appear that the egyptians are more open minded than
some people on this forum. As I said our guide and also other guides to different groups stressed that we could dress in shorts and T shirts or anything else we felt comfortable in when we visited the sites along the nile in Luxor and Aswan. (And I also pointed out that the guides are egyptian.) If they disapproved of this type of dress I doubt that they would encourage people to dress otherwise. I stress that this mode of dress is perfectly acceptable at theses sites,ie. Karnak Temple,Luxor Temple, The valley of the Kings and Queens and
Abu Simbel. And all I can say is by the look of things there are a lot of morons visit these sites and I will bet there were a few who wished they were in that catogory. There were no plunging necklines just a simple pair of shorts, sleeveless top and sandals worn by most people who were of all different nationalities. I can only say the way it was when I was there and I know other people who went on cruises and they dressed the same as it is a question that most people ask if they intend to visit Egypt. So by all means if somebody wants to shroud themselves like a mummy, go right ahead but I do think that when you look around at other peoples attire you might feel a little overdressed.
 
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Apr 3rd, 2002, 11:57 AM
  #7
Dina
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To continue this discussion with a more pleasant tone: I didn't mean to offend, noeleen, nor would I call anyone a moron.

But I did not feel overdressed in my Egyptian-style garb, nor "like a mummy". Traveling independently, I was often surrounded by Egyptians, and it felt quite comfortable.

As you say, the shorts and tank top style of dress is not forbidden (except in mosques); the Egyptian tourist industry bends over backwards to accommodate their clients. I saw groups of them climbing in and out of their buses and wondered why they didn't feel underdressed, but then they were always together, maybe that's why.

Not only was it satisfying to my love of theater and costume to look and feel different from my ordinary self in such a foreign place, I do feel I received more respect from locals by dressing appropriately by their standards, not ours.
 
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Apr 3rd, 2002, 12:03 PM
  #8
Jason
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Does anyone have suggestions for clothing. Traveling from Cairo to Aswan, cruise and fly.
=======================

If you're from Europe or North America, top of my list would be a flak jacket and kevlar helmet. I don't know if they'll let you bring in sidearms but it couldn't hurt.
 
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Apr 3rd, 2002, 11:51 PM
  #9
noeleen
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Actually Dina I have to agree with you about the national dress. We had an Egyptian night on board the boat and everyone dressed in egyptian costume. The long robe was really cool and comfortable to wear. I would wear this in the evening time if I were to visit Egypt again but I have to say I would still wear my shorts during the day. Maybe this is because I come from a cold climate and I like to feel the sunshine on my skin.
My wardrobe for going back to Egypt would contain a pair of long pants with
some short sleeved tops and one or two long sleeved garments for visiting mosques etc. Shorts, sleeveless tops for the sites along the Nile, swimwear for by the pool which in my case is a bikini but by no means a skimpy one. I think it depends on where you are as to how you dress so if you have a mixture
of dress then you can at least make a choice as to what you think you will be most comfortable in.
 
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Apr 5th, 2002, 03:32 PM
  #10
Richard L Bullock Jr
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I'like to know what is holy land is like in the middle east.?
 
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Apr 18th, 2002, 07:32 AM
  #11
Christi in Houston
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Having lived in the Middle East for quite a few years and travelled to Egypt,I can assure you that although the guides tell you to dress as you wish, it is frowned upon by the locals and does make them uncomfortable. Especially if you are among them during Ramaddan (the holy month). If you must wear shorts (ladies), make sure they are long and loose. Men should not go bare chested, period. If people insist on "doing their own thing" regardless of the feelings of the locals where they travel, then slowly the locals will tire of the tourists money and no longer welcome their presence. Why can't people learn that the entire world is made up of many different cultures and beliefs and we should welcome and honor those differences, not defy them. Nuff said.
 
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Apr 18th, 2002, 02:24 PM
  #12
Visitor
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Whilst I would agree with the previous writer I would also like to ask " why is it necessary to dress not to offend people in say the Middle East, when it is just as offensive to some of us that Asian and Middle East people wear what they like in Western Countries"? i.e. elder Indian women wearing sari with their fat midriff showing. OR Turbans for the Indian men and purda for Islamic women?
I make the above suggestion in respect to residents in Western countries and not so much visitors. Never have the feelings of westerners been thought about and I am offended that these people dress in that way are we second class citizens?
 
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Apr 19th, 2002, 05:20 AM
  #13
R.Jack Garrett
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I am old, fat, and sweat lustily..there is nothing better for this area than a loose cotton robe of the type locals wear. Because of the variety of folks in this locale you will often be taken for a local...to your benefit. I was frequently invited to sit and take scalding hot sweet tea with locals during the heat of the day and it was refreshing. Be tolerant and respect where you visit...or stay home.
 
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Apr 19th, 2002, 06:41 AM
  #14
Christi in Houston
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To visitor....
Come on. I am referring to women wearing too short shorts, tube tops, see-through clothing (and we have all seen it done) in a very conservative country where some men have not even seen their own mother's face since childhood. The turban that offends you is actually required by certain religions. The sari is a national dress for many and is certainly more conservative than what most Americans/Europeans wear. A little "fat" around the midriff is all you see as opposed to what is revealed when travellers "do their own thing" without regard to the feelings of their hosts. Now if shorts, halter tops, minidresses are considered the "national dress" of our culture, then perhaps you would have an arguement.
In reply to Mr. Garrett:
Yes, the galabaya (national dress) is quite comfortable. I would forgo the man's ghutra (sp) or headress because, at least in Dubai, it is not acceptable for non-muslims or locals to dress in the National dress. I know, I know: they want thier cake and eat it too. Can't dress like we want but can't dress like them either. But that is the way it is. They are our hosts and we should dress accordingly.
 
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