Botswana camps: finding a good mix

Reply

Nov 1st, 2005, 06:31 AM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,984
Botswana camps: finding a good mix

I enjoyed my first safari (to Londolozi) so much that I hope to plan another for next year, probably to Botswana. Id be traveling solo for 6-8 nights, and looking for camps that are in the mid-range of prices ($500-700/night in June). Im interested in game viewing of course, but I was also captivated by the sights and sounds of the bush.

Id like to find 2 or 3 camps on this trip, with a mix of environments. Ive looked at Nxabega, Sandibe, Chiefs, Tubu, and Baines would 2 or 3 of these provide a good mix? I would be especially partial to the CC Africa camps (Nxabega and Sandibe) because they dont charge a single supplement. While Im sure that the top-echelon places (Mombo et al.) are superb, Id likely need to reduce the total number of safari days if I stayed there.

Advice and comments, especially on finding a good mix of camps, would be welcome.
DonTopaz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Nov 1st, 2005, 08:08 AM
  #2
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,087
A web search will find you plenty camps to choose from. I find that recommending a personal choice camp challenging because the assumption is that you like what I like: SUBJECTIVE.

So. The regions that are worth exploring are. From the NE of the country. Chobe, Savuti/Linyanti/Kwando. The game across this geography is fairly common, no particularly unique species endemic tro any one area.

West, north. The Okovango Delta. A must. Here you should look at camps that are able to offer the full spectrum of activities and as such should weight your stay in favour at these properties.

The South: Khalahari/Mgadigadi some permanent camps, but if you want to restrain your $$'s budget, might be worth your while exploring the area by mobile safari.

Enjoy.
mkhonzo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Nov 1st, 2005, 10:33 AM
  #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,276
I can personally recommend Nxabega, having spent three wonderful nights there in June. The staff is incredibly attentive and make you feel so welcomed. They go out of their way to learn what you like and to then provide you with a fabulous experience. I was surprised that a camp that felt that pampering fit into our budget since we also had been looking for mid-range. In addition to not charging the single supplement, I believe that you might get a break on the price if you stay a few nights at Nxabega and a few nights and Sandibe since they are both CCAfrica camps. One of the agents we worked with mentioned that possibility, but we decided to do a combination of a few nights in Sabi Sands and a few nights at Nxabega instead since we were going to be in South Africa for part of the time. You might want to check on that possibility. From what I could tell of the two camps (and from what our agent told us) they would provide you with two different experiences due to their location.

The only thing you will have to do if you go to Nxabega is learn to pronounce it correctly (the x is a click). It took me all three days to learn it, but I managed !
jcasale is offline  
Reply With Quote
Nov 1st, 2005, 11:14 AM
  #4
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 326
And I can recommend Sandibe, having visited there last year. Sandibe was more of a land base camp. From what I understand, Nxabega is more waterbased (jcasale, is that right?). Might this be the mix of environments you're looking for?
dreaming is offline  
Reply With Quote
Nov 2nd, 2005, 07:22 AM
  #5
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,182
I can only speak of Wilderness Safari camps as I haven't stayed in others yet.

Tubu Tree is a marvellous camp: With only 5 tents it's intimate. The tents are beautiful, bigger than other wilderness safari camp tents (with the exception of their few 6 paw properties) and really comfortable. The public area is beautiful too with a stunning bar and views out over a wide open plain beloved of various species. We watched a pair of leopards mate just next to the camp during dinner one evening - our soup was immediately abandoned as we all rushed to the edge of the platform to view the (short and sweet) spectacle. The management and staff are warm, efficient and friendly. The guides (at the time, Mo and Grant) are excellent - Grant is in our top 3 guides ever, probably top actually. The game here is diverse too.

I'd definitely try and cover both the Delta as well as the Linyanti area. If you only choose one camp in the Delta then do ensure you choose one that offers water activities (mokoro trips) as well as game drives - the lifeblood of the environment is the annual flood and the mokoro ride is the best way of truly experiencing that. Also I'd give 3-4 nights to this camp. Alternatively, go for two camps, one land and one water. Give yourself 2 nights in the Linyanti area. And if you'd like to, add in a visit to the Makgadikgadi Pans.

I'd do one of the following:

Dry Delta camp 3
Water Delta camp 2
Linyanti camp 2-3

or

Mixed Delta camp 4
Linyanti camp 2
Makgadikgadi Pans 2

Incidentally, if you go at the right time of the year, Tubu Tree can also offer water activities alongside game drives - check in advance.

Kavey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Nov 2nd, 2005, 02:53 PM
  #6
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,276
Yes, Nxabega is more water based, but we had some wonderful game drives. There is a nice mix of sandy grasslands, trees, and lots of water. Our tent looked out over the water and we heard hippos at night galumphing and snorting !
jcasale is offline  
Reply With Quote
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:18 AM.