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Of interest to Victorian and Edwardian history buffs...

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Recently I watched on youtube EDWARD THE SEVENTH, a 13 part ATV series for British television produced in 1975. The story line runs the gamut from Victoria’s rejection of her oldest son Bertie as a child, during her unprecedented decades of mourning for her consort Albert, including her relationships with various prime ministers – all the while refusing Bertie access to the machinations of state business.

As we know Bertie then took solace in wine, women, and song while retaining a deep affection for his wife Alix and his children. He was particularly sensitive to including his oldest son George in the political picture when he finally assumed the throne after Victoria’s death in 1901.

The production has credible acting, great scenery, and a lilting musical score with cameo appearances by John Gielgud as Disraeli and Michael Hordern as Gladstone.

Just getting myself in the mood for returning to London in June – just love all that royalty stuff. :)

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