Europe Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

View all Europe activity »
  1. 1 Daytime flights - US East Coast to Paris?
  2. 2 Starting my Paris plan for May
  3. 3 No Periods in British Written English!
  4. 4 Croatia... Is dubrovnik a must?
  5. 5 "Best" train route Interlaken to Salzburg
  6. 6 Scotland 10 Nights - Trying To Narrow Down Where To Go & Stay
  7. 7 What do after Bernia Express?
  8. 8 Road trip from Naples to Basilicata, Puglia and Bari
  9. 9 Info request: Road Trip Naples to Bari-Part 2
  10. 10 Upcoming trip to Penzance, Cornwall
  11. 11 First time in London
  12. 12 One more day in Athens, any suggestions?
  13. 13 Trip Report Bedbugs in Paris.
  14. 14 3-days Athens Itinerary, thoughts? Starting this Wednesday!
  15. 15 Self drive tour companies
  16. 16 scotland
  17. 17 Lamezia Terme, Italy
  18. 18 Trip Report The Roads Less Traveled: Traversing France With Mai Tai Tom & Tracy
  19. 19 Ischia
  20. 20 Vatican Museums and Scavi Tour
  21. 21 Barcelona
  22. 22 Seville- Ronda drive time
  23. 23 3 weeks in Central/Eastern Europe
  24. 24 Fine-tuning Requested: Naxos, Santorini, Athens Itinerary
  25. 25 Italian Honeymoon Advice
View next 25 » Back to the top

Learning to Love the French as They Are

Jump to last reply

Looks like an interesting read for Francophiles (and perhaps some Francophobes as well)...

"Learning to Love the French as They Are"

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/14/books/14FREN.html?8hpib

An excerpt...

The book ["Sixty Million Frenchmen Can't Be Wrong" by Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow, two Canadian journalists] tells its share of cute stories about cross-cultural infractions that this married couple ? one a French speaker from Quebec and the other an English speaker from Ontario ? suffered and inflicted during their two-year stay in France.

But the authors' intent was more anthropological than literary as they aimed to find historic, geographic and linguistic reasons for French behavior ? not just at the table but also in business and politics and school, as well as on the subway and at the market.

They examined the many paradoxes of France. It has an overregulated economy with high taxes and double-digit unemployment, but is also one of the world's most productive countries. Its people drink, smoke and indulge in high-cholesterol food with abandon, yet have far less obesity and fewer heart problems than Americans. French attitudes are sometimes disparaged as anti-Semitic, but France was also the first European country to grant civil rights to Jews and has had Jewish presidents prime ministers.

"We wanted to decide what were perceptions and what were the results of prejudices we grew up with," Ms. Barlow explained in an interview.

36 Replies |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement