Africa & the Middle East Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

View all Africa & the Middle East activity »
  1. 1 FloShuttle. from Ben Gurion airport
  2. 2 Trip Report A First Journey to Southern Africa: Cape, Falls, and Animal Safaris
  3. 3 Trip to Kenya in August 2016
  4. 4 First time safari question
  5. 5 Dubai
  6. 6 Help choosing Safari in Botswana
  7. 7 Driving from Jo-burg to Hazyview
  8. 8 To drive or not to drive - need itinerary advice
  9. 9 Back in Iran again-just 11 days, help!
  10. 10 Trip Report 6 Days in the Danakil Depression - An Experience of a Life Time!
  11. 11 Help with last minute planning VFalls/Kruger/CapeTown
  12. 12 Etosha help
  13. 13 &Beyond vs. Wilderness Groups
  14. 14 East Africa Safari 1st Time- Summer 2016
  15. 15 private game reserve-kruger
  16. 16 Lion Sands River Lodge or Narina Lodge
  17. 17 Abu Dhabi and the Rest?
  18. 18 Dubai for 36 hours hotel recommendation
  19. 19 go2africa
  20. 20 Trip Report Fabulous Feb. 2016 Rwanda, Tanzania and Kenya Trip
  21. 21 NAMIBIA rent a car from Windhoek Airport
  22. 22 My Topic Titlelas mountains
  23. 23 Mauritius-has anyone gone on a honeymoon there?
  24. 24 Is website south-african-lodges.com Legit?
  25. 25 Botswana or Zimbabwe
View next 25 » Back to the top

Trip Report South Africa, Soweto A Sad History

Jump to last reply

Nothing saddens my heart more than the death of the innocent especially when it involves children. Standing at the Hector Peterson Memorial in Soweto, I am taken back to a time when such an event occurred. Even today it is hard to imagine the horror when in June 1976 police opened fire on 15,000 student participating in a peaceful demonstration. On that sad day in South Africa's history about 600 students innocently lost their lives for a just cause.

Forever a Hero, Hector Peterson was one of the youngest victims in South Africa's struggle to free itself from an oppressive white minority ruled government. With sad consolation, it can now be said that Hector and may others did not sacrifice their lives in vain.

A more recognized proponent of South Africa's fight from an oppressive government lived not too far away from where the student uprising occurred on June 16th, 1976. At 8115 Orlando West, I am at the former home of Nelson Mandela which is now a museum. Here, one can get just a glimpse of the struggles of those who opposed the government. Bullet holes can still be seen on the exterior walls of the home and you can hear Mrs. Mandela share her side of the experience.

The museum also displays many of Nelson Mandela's memorabilia including letters written while he spent 27 years in prison, awards and gifts including a Title Belt from a fellow boxer like himself, Sugar Ray Leonard. In his struggle to free South Africa, Nelson Mandela went from prison, returned to Soweto, won the Noble Peace Prize and eventually became South Africa's President.

Today, Mr. Mandela is in his 90's and is believed to live somewhere in the Eastern Cape.

Although the museum itself is small, the things that happened here played a huge part not only in South Africa's past but also what it has become and will continue to be in the future. Today, what happened in Soweto many decades ago is proof that good can overcome evil, that all should live free of oppression.

Did you know that Archbishop Desmond Tutu another Nobel Peace Prize winner lives just blocks from 8115 Orlando West? I imagine it is a rare occurrence to have two Nobel Prize winners that are practically neighbors.

Understanding what occurred here, it is not surprising that both Mandela and Archbishop Tutu won this prestigious award. A due recognition of what happens when you represent the best of humanity and what we can all achieve when the human spirit is triumphant.


Video:
http://youtu.be/V70z7BV6iis

7 Replies |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement